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Old 12-06-2013, 09:35 PM   #11
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One recipe called for rose water. Not having a clue I decided to go with another recipe. I will have to look next shopping trip. The local stores are limited so every couple weeks we go into the nearest 'city' and hit a few favorite stores.
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Old 12-07-2013, 05:57 AM   #12
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You are most likely to find rose water in stores that cater to Middle Eastern clients.
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Old 12-07-2013, 03:32 PM   #13
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One recipe called for rose water. Not having a clue I decided to go with another recipe. I will have to look next shopping trip. The local stores are limited so every couple weeks we go into the nearest 'city' and hit a few favorite stores.
If you decide you must have rose water and can't find it in a store you could always go the mail order route. King Arthur Flour sells it in their store in NH, which is where I bought my bottle, or you can order online.
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Old 12-07-2013, 05:27 PM   #14
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I made Baklava (the Greek version I guess?) a while ago. It was truly delicious. (I thought so anyway.)

But it was horribly expensive (in the UK nuts are really pricy).

I had a great reaction from people who tried it. But honestly, the effort of trying to keep the filo sheets damp between the layers, made it a non-winner for me.

And have you seen how filo sheets are made fresh?? Who has a table and time for that?

If you find a supplier of good Baklava, buy it I say!
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Old 12-07-2013, 05:54 PM   #15
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I worked with phyllo dough just once. Too much work and you have to work really fast. I made pockets with steamed spinach and toasted pine nuts. They came out great, but left me exhausted. If I ever decide to try it again, I will make sure I take a long nap first.
I use it a lot (I am the world's worst pastry maker - my mother used to say that good pastry makers have cold hands and a warm heart but that I had warm hands and a cold heart . She could very well be right.)

Did you try to make your own? Even in the country of origin they buy the stuff.

The secret is a damp cloth to cover the phyllo you aren't using. I admit that the first time I used it it was a bit of a trial because I wasn't used to the fragility but once you get over being frightened of it and learn to work quickly you're fine.

As well as baklava and other eastern Med dishes, I cheat and make apfel strudel with it. (I know, I know, but I only have limited tolerance for all that stretching.)
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Old 12-07-2013, 07:28 PM   #16
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KatyCooks, yeah the nuts made it scary expensive to make.
Mad Cook, I used the damp cloth method but I think the problem I had was the quick thaw method from Alton Brown. The dough seemed to have been a little cooked/dry in some areas, the areas that gave me fits. I am going to try again in a couple weeks.
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Old 12-07-2013, 09:51 PM   #17
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On the rare occasions I have used the dough, I melted the butter, poured it into a small spray bottle that I kept in a pan of very hot water. Spraying the dough between layers goes much faster that way and less chance of tearing it. I also have three special thin pastry towels that I sprayed with water rather than wet them under the faucet and then wring them out. Just enough moisture to keep from going on the dough and making it more difficult to handle. Working with this dough takes a lot of patience. More than I have now.
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Old 12-08-2013, 04:39 PM   #18
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Ooo, will use the spray bottle idea.
Thanks
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Old 12-08-2013, 08:44 PM   #19
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Ooo, will use the spray bottle idea.
Thanks
You're welcome. My pleasure. Just remember to keep it sitting in hot water to keep the butter melted. and wipe the bottom off so the water doesn't drip on the dough.
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Old 12-08-2013, 09:16 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by KatyCooks View Post
I made Baklava (the Greek version I guess?) a while ago. It was truly delicious. (I thought so anyway.)

But it was horribly expensive (in the UK nuts are really pricy).

I had a great reaction from people who tried it. But honestly, the effort of trying to keep the filo sheets damp between the layers, made it a non-winner for me.

And have you seen how filo sheets are made fresh?? Who has a table and time for that?

If you find a supplier of good Baklava, buy it I say!


Here you go

Our most popular baklava pastries
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