"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-11-2012, 01:31 PM   #11
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Andy, FYI. Apple Cider and Apple Juice are two different animals. Cider is fermented juice and cloudy looking. Juice is strained, straight from the apple and bottled. Clear looking. But he can boil down the apple juice til almost syrupy. You can get drunk on Apple Cider. Just ask Grandpa!

You should know considering you planted an apple tree instead of a money tree for grandson.
Sorry Addie, I disagree. Once upon a time in colonial New England, apple cider was a fermented product but today you can walk into any supermarket in the Commonwealth and buy apple cider that is sweet and not fermented.

Either way, if you boil down apple juice/cider you concentrate the flavors.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2012, 01:58 PM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,090
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Sorry Addie, I disagree. Once upon a time in colonial New England, apple cider was a fermented product but today you can walk into any supermarket in the Commonwealth and buy apple cider that is sweet and not fermented.

Either way, if you boil down apple juice/cider you concentrate the flavors.
I acquiesce. Although I have never seen cider in the stores. Only juice.

Those leaves on the aple tree are really dollar bills. But I won't tell grandson.
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2012, 02:02 PM   #13
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,419
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Sorry Addie, I disagree. Once upon a time in colonial New England, apple cider was a fermented product but today you can walk into any supermarket in the Commonwealth and buy apple cider that is sweet and not fermented.
That's true in the US, but it isn't a universal truth. I've been educated otherwise by the members of a British-based forum I also frequent. In most of the world, cider refers only to the fermented beverage - as it once did here. It was only during prohibition that the name got muddied when "alcohol free" cider (aka apple juice) was sold.

But I'm guessing that the original poster lives in the US, since he mentions Wal-Mart.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2012, 02:37 PM   #14
Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 51
Canada... which is why I think I can't find Muscovado sugar (nobody's even heard of it). I've found countless other posts by Canadians asking where to get it with no good answers.

Anyway, here "cider" is even more confusing. Its sold in grocery stores (where we do not have alcohol in any form other than cleaning and medicinal), is not fermented, but is cloudy. It can rarely be found unsweetened, but typically is sweetened (I searched at Christmas for unsweetened and was unable to find it). In our liquor stores, one can find "cider" that also isn't really what you're talking about... it seems to be a synonym for "cooler" - flavored alcoholic beverage that's kind of like an alcoholic soda pop. I doubt there's any natural apple in it at all.

Anyway, I get the idea... reduce apple cider/juice down until its more concentrated. I just didn't want to spend $35 on a bottle of apple brandy if it wasn't necessary.

- Steven
__________________
s_mack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 12:31 AM   #15
Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 51
Back to my post...

I'm back to being confused on the graham crackers. The store-brand I originally bought had 8 sheets that were the breadth of the box with 8 crackers about 1.5" square each. I know one of you said not to break up the sheet... but that means I'm using the WHOLE box, which is 400g or almost a pound. That's a lot of graham cracker! So I went and bought a box of Honeymaid thinking that would be more "standard"... I just opened it and they're individual 2" squares! 8 of those would be far too little, I'm sure! The simple crust recipe on the box calls for 22 squares so I can't imaging just using 8.

I ABSOLUTELY HATE how recipes don't use proper units. "whole crackers" doesn't mean ANYTHING. Grr.

Anyway, I'm invested in this recipe now... so I'm looking for best guesses.

I'm thinking of using 16 squares after reading some post somewhere that an American describes their Honeymaid as being "sheets" containing 4 rectangular crackers ~2" x 1". So that's the equiv of 2 of my squares. 8 "whole" crackers by that measure would be 16 of these squares.

Thoughts? I'm making this tomorrow morning.

- Steven
__________________
s_mack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 12:38 AM   #16
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,312
Quote:
Originally Posted by s_mack View Post
Back to my post...

I'm back to being confused on the graham crackers. The store-brand I originally bought had 8 sheets that were the breadth of the box with 8 crackers about 1.5" square each. I know one of you said not to break up the sheet... but that means I'm using the WHOLE box, which is 400g or almost a pound. That's a lot of graham cracker! So I went and bought a box of Honeymaid thinking that would be more "standard"... I just opened it and they're individual 2" squares! 8 of those would be far too little, I'm sure! The simple crust recipe on the box calls for 22 squares so I can't imaging just using 8.

I ABSOLUTELY HATE how recipes don't use proper units. "whole crackers" doesn't mean ANYTHING. Grr.

Anyway, I'm invested in this recipe now... so I'm looking for best guesses.

I'm thinking of using 16 squares after reading some post somewhere that an American describes their Honeymaid as being "sheets" containing 4 rectangular crackers ~2" x 1". So that's the equiv of 2 of my squares. 8 "whole" crackers by that measure would be 16 of these squares.

Thoughts? I'm making this tomorrow morning.

- Steven
In my world, a sheet of graham crackers is four 1x2 inch crackers. Your guess sounds about right.

I haven't done a graham cracker crust in so long, I've forgotten what I used for a cheese cake. I would likely use the above measure for a 9 inch cheesecake.
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 12:59 AM   #17
Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 51
Thanks. Your world has made my world make some sense.

I still think Mr. Flay was... well... a bit stupid for using "whole graham crackers" as a measurement. "whole" could just mean as opposed to "crumbs" so we still don't know if that means 1x2", 2x2", 2x4", 3x6"... that's a BIG difference! Even if we agree that "whole" means "sheet"... what sheet? US Honeymade? Canadian Honeymade? Wal-mart brand (3x6)?

He really may have just as well said "crush up some graham crackers... whatever you feel like really".



Anyway... wish me luck :)

- Steven
__________________
s_mack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 01:06 AM   #18
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,312
You're welcome! Good Luck!
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 03:52 AM   #19
Head Chef
 
Zereh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Bellevue, WA
Posts: 1,548


Full "sheets" of graham crackers are stacked on top of one another; a "half-sheet" is propped up against them.

That entire stack, which would all be in one nifty little package inside of a larger box, would yield about 1.25 cup of crumbs.

__________________
~~
Zereh

We are fed by a food industry which pays no attention to health, and healed by a health industry that pays no attention to food - Wendell Berry
Zereh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 09:12 AM   #20
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,408
I make a 10" cheesecake. The recipe calls for

2⅓ C Graham Cracker Crumbs
(⅔ of a 14-15 Oz. Box, 10 oz.)
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
muscovado, other, recipe

Could someone help me interpret this recipe? Mother's Day! I'm a new father and our son owe's his mother a cheesecake. He gave her gestational diabetes so she couldn't eat any sugar before he was born, and he has a milk protein so she couldn't eat any milk (transfer to breast milk) after he was born... put those two together, and we figure he owes her a cheesecake every mother's day for the rest of her life! :rofl: Anyway... she likes my cheesecake just fine, but I thought I'd search and see if I could come up with something different. [URL="http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/bobby-flay/caramel-apple-cheesecake-recipe/index.html"]I settled on this recipe[/URL] for caramel apple cheesecake. I'm not much of a baker, so I have some questions I hope someone can answer: [LIST=1] [*]The vanilla bean. I *think* I scrape the seeds to use in the cake and keep the shell/husk (whatever you call it) and put that in the apple topping mix for flavor, much like a bay leaf in a soup. So I'm not expecting it to dissolve or anything, right? It doesn't mention the bean again so I just wanted to be sure. [*]Graham crackers. It calls for 8 "whole" crackers. I bought some from Wal-mart yesterday and the box has 8 "sheets" that are divided into two major sections with a big score-mark... each of those are then divided into 4 smaller squares (about 1.5" sq). So I'm confused if its 8 small squares (that seems too little) or 8 whole sheets (which is the whole box!)... or perhaps 8 of the half sheets? Or maybe I should just go to a different store where they have a major brand like Honeymade and it will be more obvious? [*]It calls for "muscovado" sugar. I understand that's a high-molasses content sugar. I've been to every store in my small town and nobody's even heard of it. Is "Dark brown" good enough? I've also found "Demerara-style" and "Turbinado". [*]Similarly, "light brown" sugar doesn't exist here. "golden yellow" does. Same thing? I've also read Turbinado described as "light" [*]Apple brandy... OK to just use more apple juice? Neither of us drink at all, so its not like I have some laying around, and the liquor store's cheapest is $35. [/LIST] Thanks, I appreciate the timely input. - Steven ps. Ha. Just an anecdote: When I tried to register to post this message, it said my name was taken. Curious, I searched for posts by my username and found out it was me! From a decade ago. Lol, I was just starting on the Internet then and obviously I found it important to track down a forum to discuss something I bought :lol: ([URL="http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f8/best-cutting-boards-76.html"]here's my post[/URL]. The item I bought/linked to is no longer there. I do still have and use it though!) 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.