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Old 11-17-2013, 07:29 PM   #1
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Jam Making

Not sure if I'm in the right place for this but there doesn't seem to be anywhere else.

I've just been watching a Food Network UK programme called "Pioneer Woman" with a deeply irritating woman who wouldn't know a pioneer if it got up and bit her. However, that isn't my point.

She was making strawberry jam with a group of children as part of their home schooling syllabus. She made the jam in the same way as we do here but when she got to potting it up she diverted from what we do.

She sterilised her jars in boiling water - so far so good but instead of putting them in the oven to dry (which further sterilises them) she potted the jam directly into wet jars, put on the seals and then proceeded to can the jam.

She explained that if she potted the jam and sealed it and just put it on the shelf without canning it, the jam would go mouldy. Well, yes, of course it would - because she used wet jars. A no-brainer to us jam makers over here.

I've come across mention of canning jam before on another American cookery forum and it puzzles me. When we make jam we pot into dry sterilised jars and seal while the jam is still scaldingly hot and in all my years of jam making (my grandmother taught me when I was seven years old) I have never had a sealed jar go mouldy. The heat of the contents ensures a good seal and I've opened jars of jam more than a year after making and they've been perfect. I can't ever remember pots of jam made by my mother or either grandmothers going off in the sealed jars. We use the method endorsed by the Women's Institute, who are the jam experts over here. They have even advised the professionals and the government on issues surrounding jam making and other forms of food preservation.

OK, so is it a climate issue in the USA? I know you generally speaking have hotter summers than we do and some areas must be more humid even than we are.

Is it a case of "We do it because someone who was trying to sell canning equipment told our great-great-grandmothers to do it"? Or is there another reason that has escaped me?

One point that I missed, because they were measuring the sugar in cups and didn't say anything about the ratio of fruit to sugar, which is important for properly preserving the jam the way we make it. Is the canning process used because the sugar:fruit ratio is different? Usually, we use a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit for jams. I could understand the canning thing if a smaller amount of sugar is used in American recipes.

I can see the point of canning (or bottling as we call it) fruit to eat later as a dessert, for example, but not for canning already sterile jam.

And just out of interest, do you can jam in Canada or Australia as well?
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Old 11-17-2013, 07:54 PM   #2
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I'm no expert in canning, but I've never dried the jars in the oven. Usually after pulling out the jars from the boiling water, it dries itself pretty quickly. I add the boiling jam to the hot jars, add the lid and then process in boiling water.
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Old 11-17-2013, 08:02 PM   #3
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I am curious about your Pioneer Woman. Was she British or American? I didn't know you had pioneers in England.
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Old 11-17-2013, 08:11 PM   #4
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She is a blogger turned food network star, she lives on a cattle ranch in Oklahoma.

She's a much better blogger than TV personality, she comes off as annoying and insincere on the show, but her blog is really quite entertaining, she's a pretty good writer.

Now she's not rouging it like a pioneer, her husband runs a very successful ranch. The kitchen where she films is in her "lodge" which is a guest house and place where the whole clan gets together. The kitchen has at least 3 ovens. Her pantry has library ladders and a commercial sink. I have counted at least 4 Kitchenaid mixers hanging out in the pantry and a couple out in the kitchen! She cooks for a lot of people on a regular basis.

I really want that kitchen!
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Old 11-17-2013, 08:58 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I am curious about your Pioneer Woman. Was she British or American? I didn't know you had pioneers in England.
Well, we did, what about all those women, like Mrs Livingstone, who followed their husbands to unexplored Africa and other places and I bet a fair number of the women pioneers in the covered wagons crossing the prairie started out as British.

But no, she's American, called Ree Drummond, described as "one sassy former city girl" (from LA I think) with an acquired accent, a fixed smile that doesn't reach the eyes and she comes out with phrases like "Howdy, Pardner" (I thought that died out with Gabby Hayes) and lives on a ranch somewhere in Oklahoma with a "hunky husband" and a collection of children who didn't look happy about being dragged in front of the film cameras.

The series we've got comes from the US Food Network channel.
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Old 11-17-2013, 09:00 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
She is a blogger turned food network star, she lives on a cattle ranch in Oklahoma.

She's a much better blogger than TV personality, she comes off as annoying and insincere on the show, but her blog is really quite entertaining, she's a pretty good writer.

Now she's not rouging it like a pioneer, her husband runs a very successful ranch. The kitchen where she films is in her "lodge" which is a guest house and place where the whole clan gets together. The kitchen has at least 3 ovens. Her pantry has library ladders and a commercial sink. I have counted at least 4 Kitchenaid mixers hanging out in the pantry and a couple out in the kitchen! She cooks for a lot of people on a regular basis.

I really want that kitchen!
I'll fight you for it
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Old 11-17-2013, 09:07 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
I'm no expert in canning, but I've never dried the jars in the oven. Usually after pulling out the jars from the boiling water, it dries itself pretty quickly. I add the boiling jam to the hot jars, add the lid and then process in boiling water.
Probably if you are going to use the water bath after you've potted it doesn't matter about using dry jars but we are taught that wet jars for jam=mould development. Don't ask me why I'm just prepared to take the WI's and the Good Housekeeping Cookery Book's word for it.
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Old 11-17-2013, 09:52 PM   #8
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Probably if you are going to use the water bath after you've potted it doesn't matter about using dry jars but we are taught that wet jars for jam=mould development. Don't ask me why I'm just prepared to take the WI's and the Good Housekeeping Cookery Book's word for it.
Most canning standards here call for the boiling water processing. I've done it without this process, but I like the boiling water process to insure safety, overkill maybe, but I feel better about it!
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Old 11-18-2013, 11:43 AM   #9
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Ree Drummond started with an itty bitty blog that became quite popular. I think PW is a full time job for her now, and not sure how much fun that is. I guess it keeps you from getting bored back at the ranch.

I take the jars out of hot boiling water with a tong, fill. cover/ seal and do boiling water bath to make sure they properly seal. No, I don't dry them in the oven. I have seen some recipes say to run the jars through the dishwasher and that will dry them and then you take them out while they are still hot and fill with jam. I think drying them in the oven would be a useful step. I'd still do a boiling water bath. I make transitions slowly.
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Old 11-18-2013, 12:10 PM   #10
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There's an article about her in yesterday's Parade magazine. It says she started the blog as a way to keep in touch with her mother after she got married. Her husband and his family have the 17th largest land holdings in the country. She's not my favorite, but it's interesting.
http://www.parade.com/226902/sarahdi...-thanksgiving/

If the jars are sterilized, I don't see how putting them in the oven further sterilizes them. I do water-bath canning, too.
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