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Old 04-11-2007, 08:11 PM   #1
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Making Chocolate from cocoa powder

I want to make a bar of chocolate from coco powder. How can i do this:

My initial thought is to do this:
  1. Melt coco powder in pan with butter and sugar
  2. Put into pot and freeze in freezer
  3. get it out - it didnt work, but nice and rich chocolate.
How can i i get this right, i want to be a chocolatier?!

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Old 04-11-2007, 08:43 PM   #2
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welcome to DC!

research my friend, research. I am not 100% sure what you would come up with with your method...

Chocolate takes a LOT of preparation and milling/grinding. For your preparation, you might want to reverse engineer the Dutch method

Courtesy of wiki

Chocolate production


Chocolate


To make 1 kg (2.2 pounds) of chocolate, about 300 to 600 beans are processed, depending on the desired cocoa content. In a factory, the beans are washed and roasted. Next they are de-hulled by a "nibber" machine that also removes the germ. The nibs are ground between three sets of stones into a thick creamy paste. This "liquor" is converted to cocoa powder by removing part of its fatty oils (the "cocoa butter") using a hydraulic press or the Broma process. This process produces around 50% cocoa butter and 50% cocoa powder. Standard cocoa powder has a fat content of approximately 10-12 percent. The extracted fatty oils are used in confectionery, soaps, and cosmetics.
Adding an alkali produces Dutch process cocoa powder, which is less acidic, darker and more mellow in flavour than what is generally available in most of the world. Regular (nonalkalized) cocoa is acidic, so when added to an alkaline ingredient like baking soda, the two react and leave a byproduct.
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Old 04-11-2007, 09:41 PM   #3
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I'm about 95% sure you can't make a chocolate bar from cocoa powder. I think chocolate as we know is most made up of cocoa butter.
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Old 04-12-2007, 04:32 AM   #4
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Mmmmm

I like the information you gave me, however baking powder and coco powder - a reaction! What reaction?!

Perhaps some goldern syrup in with my mixture.

I have to say i did try my mixture and it was incredibly rich. I didnt melt it for long enough either. Maybe if i did it might have been ok.?
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Old 04-12-2007, 09:51 AM   #5
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I really think if you want to make chocolate, you need to start with the bean.
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Old 04-12-2007, 09:57 AM   #6
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That is fair, but whe you start with the bean surely it creates coco powder anyway, you mentioned it above?!

So if i start with coco powder what do i need to make it?
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Old 04-12-2007, 10:04 AM   #7
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First you would need to re-incorporate the proper amounts of cocoa butter.
Then, you would need to mill/grind it until it is smooth and not grainy.

Then, it needs to be tempered...multiple time to get the desired sheen and finish.

Then, comes the additives...

All in all, I appreciate your wanting to try to do it, I guess I just think that thee are far too many awesome and superior chocolates out there on the market, that are readily available.

I think it would be like trying to make sawdust, back into a tree.
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Old 04-12-2007, 07:49 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TATTRAT
All in all, I appreciate your wanting to try to do it, I guess I just think that thee are far too many awesome and superior chocolates out there on the market, that are readily available.

I think it would be like trying to make sawdust, back into a tree.
Nice analogy... And very true!

-Brad
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Old 04-13-2007, 06:16 AM   #9
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Great

Ok thanks, perhaps when my master peice chocolate bar is finished i will send you a picture?! Or a slice?!
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Old 04-18-2007, 02:18 PM   #10
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Hello,
Well hopefully I can shed some light on this subject and help out...

You can make chocolate from cocoa powder. There are companies that make their chocolate like that. Here are some things to remember though...

1) When the cocoa butter and cocoa powder are separated their have not been refined down to the correct partical size....so you might get a grainy chocolate.
2) NEVER EVER add water or a water based product to Chocolate! If you do it will either turn it into a ganache or just seize up the chocolate. If you are going to make a chocolate bar then you will need cocoa powder, cocoa butter, and sugar. If you want to add anything else it needs to be water free! Unless you are adding a dired fruit or something...the little water in that will be fine.
3) You will have to temper the chocolate(like said earlier)
4) If you want to add flavors to the chocolate then use "essential oils". Those are the flavors from the flavor source and have no water. They are fat based.
5) You can certainly make this chocolate bar but it will not come out as good as a company might make it because you do not have a refiner(partical size) or a conche(heating and agitating machine to develop flavors) but you can certainly have fun with it and make a chocolate you will enjoy...

Hope this helps,
Robert Noel
Chocolate Connoisseur
Chocolate Guild :: The Chocolate Connoisseur's Home Base
Chocolatier Nol - Gourmet Chocolate Tastings
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