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Old 01-14-2008, 06:00 AM   #1
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Making hard Glace

Hello. I would like to congratulate you on your efford here, the forum looks nice and you are doing a great job.
I have one question i d like to ask you and I would appreciate it if I got an answer to it: When i follow the recipies to make a glace either based on chocolate or sugar for my cakes or other sweets, it always ends up to be a soft topping, something that I dont really like. My question is how can i make the hard kind of glace how can i make it be hardened on top of my cakes . Thank you.

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Old 01-14-2008, 07:30 PM   #2
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Hi Explicit8

Glace icing depends upon using the right sugar. In the UK we call it "icing sugar". I`m fairly sure that in the USA you will know it as something different, maybe "confectioners" sugar. Second the icing sugar must be sieved. 8oz is sufficient for an 8 inch cake.
Third, the icing sugar should be mixed with TEPID water to give a coating consistency.
Next, where are you putting you cake after icing. If it is in a steamy kitchen, or the cake covered too quickly, this will interfere with the icing setting - somewhere not too cold and dry is best. However, set the cake on the dish ion which it is to be served either before icing or as soon as possible afterwards, otherwise the icing may crack and spoil the finish of the cake.

If you want to make chocolate icing use COCOA powder rather than chocolate. The fats in chocolate will interfere with the setting of the icing. Make sure you sieve the cocoa powder with the icing sugar BEFORE you add any water.

One further point to mention and thhis is just a thought because I don`t have the answer. A number of postings that I`ve read on this web site mention the effect of altitiude on different recipes? Do you think this could be a factor?

A couple of other points. If you are using the icing to cover a large cake, allow it to run down the sides. Trying to keep all the icing on top will delay/affect the setting of the icing. It is best tto use a metal spoon and pour above the centre of the cake, from the tip of the spoon so that the icing spreads naturally. If you are using the icing to cover cup cakes, use a teaspoon as this will give you more control over the amount you put on each cake.

Hope this helps,

Archiduc
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Old 01-14-2008, 09:31 PM   #3
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Thank you for your reply. No I actually don't live on high altitude, more like sea level. To tell you the truth i was expecting somebody to tell me a "secret" ingredient for me to add to the recipe to make the glaze the way crystallized.
As i understand now, it is only the details of how you re making it that do the difference. I tried to make sugar glaze before on tiny cakes , see it its working and i put them in the freezer (?) afterwards to see if it works. It didnt . The glaze seemed to be hardened after i got them out, but it wasnt the way i wanted them and it melted pretty soon down to how it was before i put em in the freezer.
I will try your way, and let you know. Thanks for your useful tips.
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Old 01-14-2008, 09:40 PM   #4
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Hi Explicit8,

All has now been revealed.

You problem is the result of putting the ICED cake into the freezer! Freeze the cakes without any icing on them. For a large cake fill with a jam and/or flavoured buttercream. Remove the cake or cup cakes from the freezer, allow them to thaw and come up to room temperature. One suggestion I would make is that if you are dealing with a large cake, say 8" round cake, look at the cake at eye level and if you see any beads of moisture on the cake, dab with a piece of kitchen paper before icing.

Make up your glace icing and use.

RULES - GLACE ICING - ice after defrosting;
Butter cream - can ice AND freeze.

Let me know how you get on.

All the best,
Archiduc
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Old 01-14-2008, 10:25 PM   #5
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For chocolate shells, less fat. For sugar shells, more sugar.
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Old 01-15-2008, 12:57 AM   #6
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A technical add on question from me- in the case of a sugar glace could you cook the sugar component to the hard crack stage and achieve a harder coating by that means?

Also, for chocolate toppings, what about a ganache that was perhaps 7/8 chocolate and 1/8 cream rather than 1/2 chocolate 1/2 cream? I assume the sugar content of the chocolate would affect this outcome a little.
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Old 01-15-2008, 11:04 AM   #7
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I understand. But not in all the cases I have freezed the cake first. I have tried different things and the result is always not the desired one, which is the hard or crystallized glace. As i understand you suggest that moisture is a reason my glace is not becoming hard? Did i understand correctly?
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Old 01-15-2008, 11:16 AM   #8
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Moisture will cause havoc with sugar glazes. If you have frozen it, and then add the icing, I think that you might be making matters worse. When freezing, it can bring more moisture to the surface and when you add anything warmer, it will that said moisture, watering down the icing.

As far as cooking sugar to any stage, unless soft ball, it is better to either dip and oject(so long as it is dry) or pull the sugar and wrap the cake. Boiling hot confectionery napalm is ripping hot, I feel like if you were to pour it on a cake, it might darken, if not scorch whatever you are pouring it on.
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