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Old 06-05-2006, 12:03 PM   #1
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Two meringues?

Looking for advice on meringues. I know there are 2 types--crunchy like that in kisses and soft centered llike that in pavlova. Is is just a matter of cooking time and temperatures? I read that the amount of sugar to egg ration has something to do with it..Anyone?

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Old 06-05-2006, 02:04 PM   #2
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As I replied to you in another thread (can't remember which one, though!) I add a little vinegar to the meringue mix when making pavlovas which makes for a more chewy meringue rather than a chalk-finish!
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Old 06-05-2006, 02:47 PM   #3
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Ishbel, you wantto elaborate on the recipe. I also would like to make some soft ones. Trying to reproduce recipe from my childhood, haven't beenable so far.
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Old 06-06-2006, 01:53 AM   #4
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Ishbel, Charlie got it right--how about the recipe? I also would like to know which vinegar? I am in Greece and we seem to have every type from Apple to Zeno, but we haven't the regular white distilled. So, I am guessing that it will probably be that one..
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Old 06-06-2006, 03:33 AM   #5
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Yes, I use white distilled vinegar! I've seen it for sale on some of the Greek islands, particularly those areas where there are expat British people.

Here's my recipe, which I got from my sister on one of my first visits to Australia. BUT there are as many pavlova recipes in Australia as there are Australians, so I am prepared to have someone say it's not 'authentic'

4 large egg whites
8 oz caster sugar
1 teaspoon cornflour
2 teaspoons white vinegar

Preheat the oven to 150C/300F/Gas Mark 2.
Whisk the whites till stiff and gradually add the sugar, cornflour and vinegar, without losing any volume.
Spread or pipe the meringue on baking parchment so that it is at least an inch (2.5 cm) in thickness, and making a dip in the centre of the mix so it looks like a shallow bowl.
Place in the oven and bake for 15 minutes and then lower the heat to 140C/275F/Gas Mark 1 and continue to cook for a further hour, or until the top and sides feel solid to the touch. This recipe gives a slightly more 'chewy' texture to the pavlova.

Allow to cool before you fill with double cream and mixed fresh fruits/berries of your choice. I love kiwi fruits, passionfruit and nectarines!.
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Old 06-06-2006, 07:33 AM   #6
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That is the same recipe with vinegar that I use to make my crisp meringue. I think it is the undercooking that makes for the chewy center of a pavlova.
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Old 06-06-2006, 07:46 AM   #7
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What vinegar should I try if I can not find distilled white? Maybe apple, white wine...??? What?
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Old 06-06-2006, 07:51 AM   #8
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Hmmmmmm - as I've never had to substitute, I have no idea! Here's something on vinegars from wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vinegar#Apple_cider
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Old 06-06-2006, 11:42 AM   #9
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Ishbel, what is custard sugar and could it be replaced with plain regular sugar?
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Old 06-06-2006, 12:06 PM   #10
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Caster sugar is a grade between granulated and fine icing sugar. It is used a lot in baking here in the UK. I'm not sure what the US equivalent would be... but I'm sure one of the cooks on here will know! Because it is finer grains, it makes better meringues.
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