"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-26-2004, 05:41 PM   #21
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by aruzinsky
Fondant is for people who eat with their eyes instead of their mouth.

The "marzipan" on cakes is usually almond paste or apricot kernel paste. It is my experience that a 5 lb can of either can be bought cheaply from wholesale bakery suppliers. With the price of almonds going up, apricot kernel paste is probably much cheaper now and nobody is going to be able to tell the difference.

If you live in the Chicago, IL, USA area, I can give you the name and address of my supplier.
Not true. Your statements indicate how little you know about cake decorating.

Rolled fondant is used, basically, for two reasons. First is appearance. A lot of people just like the appearance of a cake decorated in fondant. While it doesn't taste anything but sweet, the fondant is routinely removed before slicing and the base coating of buttercream frosting gives the sweet rich taste people generally like. The second reason is rolled fondant is used in cases where the cake will have to stay in a warm environment for a significant length of time. Other than non-butter vegetable shortening based buttercream, rolled fondant is the most resistant to the detrimental effects of heat and humidity.

There is also another form of fondant that's routinely flavored with chocolate and used to coat pastries such as eclaires. The plain or flavored and sometimes tinted fondant of this nature is also used to cover Napoleons. There are other pastries that use this soft non-rolled fondant. Eclaires and Napoleons are the two most popular uses. Oh, they often use it on donuts.

Most "cream" centered candies are made using fondant middles. As another poster noted, another use is to cover cherries with fondant, then dip in chocolate. The fondant eventually leaches the moisture from the candied cherry and melts into a syrup. That's how they get the syrup into chocolate covered cherries.

Finally, was your nick at one time Pizza something or other on another board?
__________________

__________________
Psiguyy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2004, 03:14 PM   #22
Head Chef
 
htc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Oregon
Posts: 1,302
Some people actually remove the fondant before cutting the cake? Man, it seems like a lot of work to do, just to have it taken off...or maybe it's just a lot of work to me since I'm just a home baker...
__________________

__________________
htc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2004, 04:38 PM   #23
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by htc
Some people actually remove the fondant before cutting the cake? Man, it seems like a lot of work to do, just to have it taken off...or maybe it's just a lot of work to me since I'm just a home baker...
It's easy. The fondant just lifts right off. You first remove the larger decorations, such as flowers, then lift the fondant, then cut the cake and serve. Mostly done for weddings where the cake slices are thin, so the appearance of the frosting isn't so important. If you've never done it, it's kinda hard to make thin slices of cake through fondant.
__________________
Psiguyy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2004, 03:20 AM   #24
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by aruzinsky
Fondant is for people who eat with their eyes instead of their mouth.

The "marzipan" on cakes is usually almond paste or apricot kernel paste. It is my experience that a 5 lb can of either can be bought cheaply from wholesale bakery suppliers. With the price of almonds going up, apricot kernel paste is probably much cheaper now and nobody is going to be able to tell the difference.

If you live in the Chicago, IL, USA area, I can give you the name and address of my supplier.

BTW, I forgot to mention or rather question. How do you make pure white marzipan?
__________________
Psiguyy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2004, 02:11 PM   #25
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Long Island, New York, USA
Posts: 485
The dude is gone Psiguy. Has not posted for a while.
__________________
debthecook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2004, 04:09 PM   #26
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by debthecook
The dude is gone Psiguy. Has not posted for a while.
I noticed that. Wondering if he really is you know who? His responses reminded me of you know who.
__________________
Psiguyy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2004, 10:29 PM   #27
Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 75
Rolled Fondant or Sugarpaste

Rolled fondant is sugarpaste: Americans call it "Rolled Fondant"; the British call it "Sugarpaste": Australians call it "Sugarpaste" or "Rolled Fondant". It is uncooked. "Fondant" refers ONLY to Poured Fondant [European Fondant].

European Fondant is made by boiling sugar, water and glucose, cooling it then working the sugar until it is smooth and creamy. It is basically used for the centres of confectionery, and other sweets. Poured Fondant icined is used to cover [pour] over petit fours,

Rolled fondant is normally made gelatine, glycerine and glucose (corn syrup) with lots of sugar. It has a dough-like consistency that "dries" with a semi-hard, perfectly smooth, and satiny surface that is soft underneath.

Ready-to-use Rolled Fondant (Wilton, Satin Ice, Regalice and Pettinice) contains a small amount of gum tragacanth and/or carboxymethylcellulose [CMC]which are the ingredients that are used to dry out and harden gumpaste. Consequently, the product dries quicker and harder than homemade rolled fondant.

The taste of rolled fondant is a bland sugar. The blandness of sugarpaste [rolled fondant] is specifically to balance the richness of fruitcakes for which it was made for originally. Decorators can work for weeks and months on the decoration of such cakes because the cake matures over time and the sugar paste remains edible.

Cakes that rely on the icing to provide flavor or richness, such as a genoise, really require buttercream. Standard American butter, vanilla and chocolate cakes can work well with either icing. The cake must have a dense structure to support the weight.

Rolled Fondant or Sugarpaste is the icing on a firm cake. A thin layer of buttercream or apricot "glues" the icing to the cake. The buttercream is there to stick the fondant to the cake, not to provide an alternative icing. Buttercream will discolour royal icing, and dissolve sugarpaste over time.

It would appear that people prefer the look of fondant but want the taste of buttercream. If the fondant was not meant to be eaten, why cover the cake and expend time and money on the exercise? What a waste! Rolled Fondant or Sugarpaste should be cut and served as part of the cake. It cannot be presumed that the guests does not, or will not, like the taste of the fondant. As part of the cake, it is served - if the recipent tastes and does not like it, they can remove it.
__________________
auzzi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2004, 08:02 AM   #28
Executive Chef
 
marmalady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,SouthCarolina
Posts: 2,642
Er - welcome - back? - 'auzzi' :roll:
__________________
marmalady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2004, 01:04 AM   #29
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 843
Re: Rolled Fondant or Sugarpaste

Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi
It cannot be presumed that the guests does not, or will not, like the taste of the fondant. As part of the cake, it is served - if the recipent tastes and does not like it, they can remove it.
Try cutting a tall slice of an inch thick or less through rolled fondant at room temperature. Try cutting 400 slices. It's a nightmare. So, you lift off the fondant before you cut.
__________________

__________________
Psiguyy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fondant recipe COOKINGONGAS Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy 1 02-12-2005 08:32 PM
How the heck do I unmold chocolate? jasonr Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy 7 01-28-2005 12:06 PM
What the heck is long rice? spryte International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery 9 01-02-2005 11:07 PM
Bourbon-Soaked Chocolate-Covered Long-Stem Cherries Audeo Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy 10 11-22-2004 11:54 AM
Audeo please read Sweetdaisy Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy 4 10-05-2004 12:36 PM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.