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Old 10-22-2004, 07:06 PM   #1
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What the heck is fondant?

Ok, so I'm a novice baker...I bought a Wilton product called fondant...don't know what I will do with it. (figured I better buy it, just in case I want to use it soon) I know fondantused to decorate cakes, etc.
I also picked up a book called the essential cake decorating book. This is an awesome book, even though I'm not at that level of baking. I don't see anything in the book called fondant.

Is fondant sugar paste? I know marzipan is made from almonds and can be shaped (I think), is fondant like this? Can I use it to make little shapes or figures? Or can it only be rolled out and covering something? Ideas on how I can use it? I went to Wilton's website and see that I can add coloring to it (I bought basic white)

Thank you!! :D

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Old 10-22-2004, 07:12 PM   #2
 
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Fondant is a sugar syrup that is crystallized to a smooth, creamy white mass and is used for both icing cakes and cake decorations. The cooked Fondant (European Fondant) is quite difficult to make but is the best Fondant recipe around due to its elasticity and smoothness.
European Fondant is made by boiling sugar, water and glucose to 240°.
It is then poured onto a marble slap and sprinkle with some water to prevent crystallization. Once the syrup has cooled down to 110°F, start to work the sugar with a steel scraper, folding it onto itself. Do not attempt to work it before it cooled to 110° or it will become tough and coarse. After a while it will start turning white. Work the fondant until it is smooth and creamy. It may take well over 40 minutes to achieve the right consistency. Once smooth and creamy store in an airtight container for later use.
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Old 10-23-2004, 04:59 PM   #3
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I don't find fondant difficult at all, once you know what to expect. But I have made more than my own weight of the stuff. The worst part is the last two minutes of stirring, at most, which is not that bad and a good workout for the upper arms! It's very simple to make and extremely versatile...ranging from an almost infinite number of flavored creamy candy centers, to the liquid surrounding cherries in chocolate-covered cherries, to a silken-smooth coating for cakes, etc. The Wilton's stuff is fine, but once you make and taste the real thing, you'll never stray from it.

As Juliev implied, fondants have few ingredients. Basically, they consist of sugar, corn syrup or cream of tartar, cream or milk, water and salt. It is the proportion of these ingredients and the length of time they are cooked that determines the final characteristics of the candy.

I have four basic fondant recipes that are appropriate for any application. Some must be aged (allowed to rest overnight or so in a ziploc bag or longer in the refrigerator), and one does not. If you would like one or more recipes, let me know. But since I have this certain downfall of not being able to post brief posts here (ahem!), I won't post them unless someone wants them....(for now! Ha!)
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Old 10-25-2004, 12:13 PM   #4
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Thanks for the info. I am going to try to use the Wilton stuff first before I branch into making my own. Sounds too intimidating. :)

Still a bit unsure what I can use it for with cakes. So if I use the wilton stuff, I don't need frosting, right? Or do I use the fondant and frosting as well? Thanks!
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Old 10-25-2004, 02:42 PM   #5
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I think (someone please correct me if I am wrong) the fondant replaces the frosting.

This is what a cake decorated with fondant might look like...

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Old 10-25-2004, 02:48 PM   #6
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Fondant is for people who eat with their eyes instead of their mouth.

The "marzipan" on cakes is usually almond paste or apricot kernel paste. It is my experience that a 5 lb can of either can be bought cheaply from wholesale bakery suppliers. With the price of almonds going up, apricot kernel paste is probably much cheaper now and nobody is going to be able to tell the difference.

If you live in the Chicago, IL, USA area, I can give you the name and address of my supplier.
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Old 10-25-2004, 03:31 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aruzinsky
Fondant is for people who eat with their eyes instead of their mouth.
I shall presume your ruling applies strictly to cakes. Because it certainly does not apply to candy. If you want to become a first-class candymaker, learning to make smooth, creamy fondant is a requirement, as fondants are the very basis for many candies. But few people have that precise a goal in their candymaking and have no intention of going into business making the stuff for a living either. For them, the experience is more fun than academic.

For the average open-minded cook wanting to test new waters, pre-mixed offerings are extremely convenient and meet the goals of said cook admirably.

htc, I'd bet the Wilton stuff will work great for you and that you will further enjoy the experience of trying out a new technique. Regardless. And, yes, it does replace frosting, with GB's lovely picture a prime example.

Have fun, and please do let us know what you think afterwards!
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Old 10-25-2004, 03:37 PM   #8
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And what goes into your mouth instead of your eyes, Aruzinsky for your OCD because neither the almond or apricot kernal paste are cutting it.
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Old 10-25-2004, 03:48 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Audeo
Quote:
Originally Posted by aruzinsky
Fondant is for people who eat with their eyes instead of their mouth.
I shall presume your ruling applies strictly to cakes.
That was my intent because it appears to be the context of the thread starter. However, I am unaware of any fondant based candy that I like so, for all I know, my ruling maybe should be extended to candy. Maybe, you can point out some fondant based candy that is popular?

How do like my avatar? Isn't it ironic?
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Old 10-25-2004, 03:53 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by debthecook
And what goes into your mouth instead of your eyes, Aruzinsky for your OCD because neither the almond or apricot kernal paste are cutting it.
What exactly do you have against almond or apricot kernel paste?
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