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Old 05-10-2008, 08:52 PM   #1
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Russian Fudge

I made this tonight, I don't know if it is suppose to be hard , like peanut brittle. The spoon is stuck to the bowl too Anyone try this recipe?




Russian Fudge Recipe | Recipezaar

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Old 05-10-2008, 10:26 PM   #2
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I think it's supposed to be like blonde fudge, Lady, not peanut brittle.

Take a look at the pictures in this link The Waitakere Redneck's Kitchen: Russian Fudge

Lee
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Old 05-14-2008, 08:55 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by LadyCook61 View Post
I made this tonight, I don't know if it is suppose to be hard , like peanut brittle. The spoon is stuck to the bowl too Anyone try this recipe?




Russian Fudge Recipe | Recipezaar
Hi Ladycook61,
It sounds to me as though you have cooked the mix for too long. I`ve checked my recipe and it should be boiled to a temperature of 118C/245F. Once the mixture has reached this temperature it should be removed from the heat. allow the bubbles to subside and then pour into a greased tin. You should mark the mixture into squares, using a buttered knife when the mix is half set. Finally, as I`m sure you know, after you`ve poured the mixture into the tin, soak the pan in cold water.

A fantastic range of sweets can be cooked at home or in a commercial kitchen to serve with coffee. However, they are all temperature sensitivie and it is worth investing in a sugar thermometer or perhaps using a digital probe. For example, soft vanilla caramels should be cooked to 121C/250F, honey caramels to 130C/265F and walnut caramels to 124C/255F. The reason for the different temperature is the need to remove water, by boiling to achieve the right degree of sugar saturation in the finished product.

Hope this helps,
Archiduc
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Old 05-15-2008, 11:40 AM   #4
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Sounds to me like some body was traing to make dulche de leche. Sugar and milk would make condensed milk if cook long enouh then if conmtinue cooking it will become what is known as dulche de leche in Latin America.

Never heard or seen anybody making anything like this in Russia. Why does it have to be call "Russian ..." I do not know...
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Old 05-15-2008, 01:48 PM   #5
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maybe they were in a "rush" to make it and should have spelled it "rushin' fudge"?
just a thought. :)
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Old 05-15-2008, 02:21 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by archiduc View Post
Hi Ladycook61,
It sounds to me as though you have cooked the mix for too long. I`ve checked my recipe and it should be boiled to a temperature of 118C/245F. Once the mixture has reached this temperature it should be removed from the heat. allow the bubbles to subside and then pour into a greased tin. You should mark the mixture into squares, using a buttered knife when the mix is half set. Finally, as I`m sure you know, after you`ve poured the mixture into the tin, soak the pan in cold water.

A fantastic range of sweets can be cooked at home or in a commercial kitchen to serve with coffee. However, they are all temperature sensitivie and it is worth investing in a sugar thermometer or perhaps using a digital probe. For example, soft vanilla caramels should be cooked to 121C/250F, honey caramels to 130C/265F and walnut caramels to 124C/255F. The reason for the different temperature is the need to remove water, by boiling to achieve the right degree of sugar saturation in the finished product.

Hope this helps,
Archiduc
thanks for your input. I do have a candy thermometer. The groundhogs loved the disaster.
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Old 05-15-2008, 03:04 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by suziquzie View Post
maybe they were in a "rush" to make it and should have spelled it "rushin' fudge"?
just a thought. :)

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Old 05-18-2008, 09:24 PM   #8
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Sounds to me like some body was traing to make dulche de leche. Sugar and milk would make condensed milk if cook long enouh then if conmtinue cooking it will become what is known as dulche de leche in Latin America.

Never heard or seen anybody making anything like this in Russia. Why does it have to be call "Russian ..." I do not know...
Hi CharlieD,
There are numerous recipes in a wide variety of cookery books giving recipes for "Russian Toffee". Fortunatelly, fortniattestly, fortunately the editors spell better than you or me!

Russian toffee is a supersaturated sugar classic - poured into greased tins and marked when half set, (with a buttered knife) etc., before being wrapped to give to friends in jars to give as presents or served in a restaurant as a "petit fours" guaranteed to extract the fillings of the "Matriarch", granny or grandpa!

In the UK, "dulche de leche" is what one uses to make a Banoffee Pie or a delightful and very moreish concoction known as "Millionaire`s Shortbread" and has nothing to do with toffee (Russian) in any shape or form. We can buy (in the UK) "dulche de leche", to use in our cooking and the two most common uses will be in a Banoffee Pie or "Millionaire`s Shortbread".

Regards,
Archiduc
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Old 05-18-2008, 10:38 PM   #9
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I think it's supposed to be like blonde fudge, Lady, not peanut brittle.

Take a look at the pictures in this link The Waitakere Redneck's Kitchen: Russian Fudge

Lee
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