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Old 12-18-2007, 06:10 PM   #1
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Tiramisu.. next step up..

OKay, for Thanksgiving i made this cheaper version of Tiramisu, that everyone loved.

I don't have the recipe with me, but it was mostly vanilla pudding, whipped cream, vanilla wafers soaked in coffee, and grated semi-sweet chocolate.

I know this is not 'actual' Tiramisu, and was thinking about trying to make a better version of it, if not the actual way. Dosn't 'actual' Tiramisu have a liquour in it?

Thanks for your help!

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Old 12-18-2007, 06:14 PM   #2
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Actual tiramisu has espresso in it, not necessarily a liqueur. The hardest part about making tiramisu, for me at least, is finding the marscapone cheese.
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Old 12-18-2007, 06:22 PM   #3
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Hm.. yeah, i've never even heard of marscapone cheese..

It dosn't necessarily have to be 'actual' tiramisu.. i was just wondering if there is another version that's a bit harder than the one i've done, but not *too* hard.. lol

Since everyone loved it last time, i might just make it again to be safe. I was just curious.
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Old 12-18-2007, 06:22 PM   #4
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I just made a "real" one for the first time and all the recipes I read called for some sort of alcohol - usually Kahlua or dark rum. Also espresso or very strong brewed coffee with espresso powder or crystals. And it is sometimes hard to find the mascarpone but it's available at most upscale type grocery stores.

It's really not hard to assemble and you owe it to yourself to try this, beginner. It's fantastic!
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Old 12-18-2007, 07:47 PM   #5
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I've never had trouble finding mascarpone, even at a non "upscale" store. It's by the ricotta, sometimes cream cheese. If you google a mascarpone substitute I know there is one, I just can't think of it. I think you use cream cheese mixed with whipped cream.
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Old 12-18-2007, 07:53 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suziquzie View Post
I've never had trouble finding mascarpone, even at a non "upscale" store. It's by the ricotta, sometimes cream cheese. If you google a mascarpone substitute I know there is one, I just can't think of it. I think you use cream cheese mixed with whipped cream.
You gotta remember, most of us only have a Wal-Mart superstore or a Kroger in our hometowns. And no, they don't carry marscapone. Whenever I want some, it's an hour drive to Indianapolis and a gourmet cheese shop.

I've made tiramisu both ways - with liqueur and concentrated espresso - and I like the espresso better. The liqueur made it too sweet.
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Old 12-18-2007, 08:50 PM   #7
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Hi Beginner Chef, you can make a cheaper version of tiramisu with readily available ingredients. It will be better than your bare basic version and you don't need to dish out the bucks for the expensive marsala wine or mascarpone cheese.

I entertain a lot and I have made two trays of Tiramisu for 60 people. It would be a heck lot expensive if I used Mascarpone so I substitute. I used the ladyfinger cookies but you can use cake instead. I have also bought white cake mix and baked it in a sheetpan and then cut it into fingers and used that with a good amount of luck.

The cream should be made using 1 8oz block of cream cheese and 1 pint of whipping cream. I like to first beat the cream cheese until it's light and fluffy with a paddle attachment and then switch to a whisk and pour in the cream and add some sugar (to taste) and some vanilla and a bit of almond extract. Beat it until the mixture is light and fluffy.

Make super strong coffee and let it come to room temperature

Arrange a layer of cake fingers or whatever you use and then brush the coffee on top of it ( I use a pastry brush). Pour some cream, repeat cake and cream finishing with the cream. Dust it evenly with unsweetened cocoa powder or grated dark chocolate.

Key is to let this sit in the refrigerator for atleast 12 hours before serving. If you keep it for 24 hours it will be even better.

The key is not to make the cake too moist and not put a ton of cream in each layer. This produces a nice stiff cake like tiramisu and truly it's hard to know that it is made without mascarpone if you get the cream cheese and whipped cream proportion correct. If you don't add enough heavy cream the mixture will not be light and will taste like a dense cream cheese and you don't want that.
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Old 12-18-2007, 09:02 PM   #8
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Thank you Yakuta!! I think i just might be able to do that. So would you say that the you want to get the cream mixture as fluffy as possible? I'd hate to make it and have it taste like a dense cream cheese!! I've heard of 'Lady Fingers' before, but have never actualy seen them.. So it turned out alright, doing it with a white cake mix? Thanks again!
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Old 12-18-2007, 09:04 PM   #9
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Oh also, last time i made this (since it was mostly pudding) the directions said to serve it in a big bowl. Is this going to be more like a cake? Or will it be in a bowl as well?
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Old 12-18-2007, 09:34 PM   #10
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I always make mine in a glass casserole dish.
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