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Old 11-03-2011, 01:23 PM   #11
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Would that be black strap or fancy molasses?
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Old 11-03-2011, 01:28 PM   #12
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Would that be black strap or fancy molasses?

I use Grandma's unsulfured for baking things such as pecan pie. I'd use the same to make brown sugar.
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Old 11-03-2011, 02:28 PM   #13
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Would that be black strap or fancy molasses?
What is the difference?
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Old 11-03-2011, 02:30 PM   #14
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What is the difference?

From Wikipedia:

To make molasses, the cane of a sugar plant is harvested and stripped of its leaves. Its juice is extracted usually by crushing or mashing, but also by cutting. The juice is boiled to concentrate it, which promotes the crystallization of the sugar. The result of this first boiling and of the sugar crystals is first molasses, which has the highest sugar content because comparatively little sugar has been extracted from the source. Second molasses is created from a second boiling and sugar extraction, and has a slight bitter tinge to its taste.
The third boiling of the sugar syrup makes blackstrap molasses. The term is an Americanism dating from around 1920. The majority of sucrose from the original juice has been crystallized and removed. The calorie content of blackstrap molasses is still mostly from the small remaining sugar content.[2] However, unlike refined sugars, it contains trace amounts of vitamins and significant amounts of several minerals. Blackstrap molasses is a source of calcium, magnesium, potassium, and iron; one tablespoon provides up to 20% of the daily value of each of those nutrients.[3] Blackstrap has long been sold as a health supplement. It is also used in the manufacture of ethyl alcohol for industry and as an ingredient in cattle feed.
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Old 11-03-2011, 02:35 PM   #15
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Thanks Andy. What is the difference in taste? Sweetness? I have always just used blackstrap molasses. Would "fancy" be the first molasses?
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Old 11-03-2011, 02:40 PM   #16
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Thanks Andy. What is the difference in taste? Sweetness? I have always just used blackstrap molasses. Would "fancy" be the first molasses?

According to Wiki, blackstrap is more bitter and less sweet. First is sweetest. I assume first is the fancy.
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Old 11-03-2011, 05:39 PM   #17
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I've also understood it was 1 tbsp molasses to 1 cup brown sugar for light, 2 tbsp molasses for dark. This produces the same product that you would see in the stores.

I buy light brown and add the appropriate amount of molasses to the recipe if it calls for dark, no need to have both in the house.
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Old 11-03-2011, 06:52 PM   #18
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I've also understood it was 1 tbsp molasses to 1 cup brown sugar for light, 2 tbsp molasses for dark. This produces the same product that you would see in the stores.

I buy light brown and add the appropriate amount of molasses to the recipe if it calls for dark, no need to have both in the house.
Great idea. I really like the flavour of dark brown sugar. I only buy the light one when that is all that is available.
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Old 11-03-2011, 06:54 PM   #19
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That is a good idea. I always have molasses on hand.
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Old 11-03-2011, 09:20 PM   #20
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Why thank you. I always have molasses on hand and the thought just hit me one day. I'm always looking for easier ways to do things.
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recipe, sugar

What is the right sugar to use for this recipe? I am making a chocolate brownie cake which can be found here.[url=http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/3431/chocolate-brownie-cake]Chocolate brownie cake recipe - Recipes - BBC Good Food[/url] The recipe says to use 175g of caster sugar along with 75g of brown or muscovado sugar. Is it better to use brown or muscovado and which type, light or dark, as the recipe does not specify 3 stars 1 reviews
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