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Old 08-16-2006, 06:48 PM   #1
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Question Boneless chicken question

Did anyone see the" Everyday Italian "cooking lady on the Food Network give a hint today on TV about cooking boneless chicken breast? She put the chicken breast in a grill pan and cooked it just enough to get the grill marks. Then she put them in the refrigerator to cool completly. When they were cool to put them on a cookie sheet and baked them in the oven. I didn't get the temperature or how long. When they were cooked she put something on them too. I was cleaning up some paper work and missed what she did to finish them off. Thanks if you can help.

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Old 08-16-2006, 06:51 PM   #2
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Look on foodtv.com
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Old 08-16-2006, 06:59 PM   #3
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It wasn't on her regular TV show, it was just a short clip between other shows. I did go on the Food Network and could not find it. I thought maybe someone else saw the whole thing and was paying attention. Thanks though for your advice.
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Old 08-19-2006, 05:07 PM   #4
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Hi JoAnn

Double cooking chicken is a sure way to get tender chicken, especially if you add liquid to the second cooking. I recall seeing what you saw some time ago and was disturbed by the long time period between between the two cookings. It's extremely hazardous to cook the chicked for a couple of minutes and then return it to the fridge, and then cook it. I would have preferred she went from grill to oven immediately. Timing is everything when it comes to chicken and salmonella. It's important to hold the chicken at either 40 degrees or 140 degrees (after cooking it to 165). My concern is that it was only initially cooked to somewhere in the vicinity of 85 degrees to mark it, and then it was returned to the fridge where it would have to quickly return to 40 degrees. At that point, she'd have less than two hours to get it up to 165 before I would consider it too hazardous to consume.

I don't recall what she did to finish them off, but I would have topped them with a fruit/jalepeno salsa.

If your chicken breast is 6 oz, it will take approx. 25 minutes to cook it at 350. If it's slightly smaller, it will take about 20 minutes.
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Old 08-19-2006, 05:21 PM   #5
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I've seen/read about the "double cooking" method for chicken before & don't like it.

First, as VeraBlue mentioned, there are possible health issues.

Second, there's absolutely no reason for it - it just wastes time & cookware.

If you're going to end up baking or braising your chicken in liquid, then just sear & braise/bake it. No need to make a convoluted production out of it - lol!! I can't help but think that good old "Everyday Italian" was just trying to make a new trick out of an old old method. Something that happens all too frequently on the Food Network shows.

If you're concerned about thick chicken breasts cooking through & still remaining juicy, then either pound them to a uniform thickness (this does not automatically mean pounded to scallopini thickness - just to the point where the breast is a relatively uniform thickness throughout), OR just lightly slash the thick breasts with a sharp knife before searing/baking.
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Old 08-19-2006, 05:27 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
I've seen/read about the "double cooking" method for chicken before & don't like it.

First, as VeraBlue mentioned, there are possible health issues.

Second, there's absolutely no reason for it - it just wastes time & cookware.

If you're going to end up baking or braising your chicken in liquid, then just sear & braise/bake it. No need to make a convoluted production out of it - lol!! I can't help but think that good old "Everyday Italian" was just trying to make a new trick out of an old old method. Something that happens all too frequently on the Food Network shows.

If you're concerned about thick chicken breasts cooking through & still remaining juicy, then either pound them to a uniform thickness (this does not automatically mean pounded to scallopini thickness - just to the point where the breast is a relatively uniform thickness throughout), OR just lightly slash the thick breasts with a sharp knife before searing/baking.
Hi Breezy,

I agree, there is little reason to double cook if you have to change pans. Consider chicken marsala or picata.. Don't you first lightly sautee the breast and then add the liquid/stock/wine to gently simmer the chicken till done? I wouldn't recommend slashing the breast to hasten cooking because then you'd end with a product that is all sliced up, rather than neat and tidy...

I also have to agree that many food network shows are all about reinventing the wheel...
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Old 08-19-2006, 05:37 PM   #7
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Exactly. And while, granted, chicken for marsala or piccata is pounded into thin cutlets, even when I'm using whole (even bone in) breasts, the meat is only out of the searing pan maybe 10 minutes tops before being returned for complete braising/sauteeing/baking.

I can't imagine any time or quality improvement by sticking the chicken into the fridge & then returning it to the pan. In fact, I would wholeheartedly think one would be more likely to lose more moisture by this method.
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Old 08-19-2006, 08:28 PM   #8
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Vera Blue and Breezy Cooking

Thank you so much for the information. After reading what you guys said , I don't think I will be making the chicken breast that way. It doesn't sound safe.
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Old 08-19-2006, 09:05 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoAnn L.
Thank you so much for the information. After reading what you guys said , I don't think I will be making the chicken breast that way. It doesn't sound safe.
I don't think it is a question of safety at all, if you follow good food safety rules. I do think it is unnecessary unless you are trying to cook for a crowd a long time in advance.
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Old 08-19-2006, 10:36 PM   #10
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I'm with Gretchen - I don't think there is a safety issue - IF you know what Giada said and follow her instructions ... which nobody seems to know, and speculation has gotten out of hand.

She is a classically trained chef (Le Cordon Bleu in Paris) - has worked in professional kitchens (Ritz Carlton and Wolfgang Puck’s Spago in Beverly Hills), has operated a very successful personal chef and catering business ... all of which ofter prepare meals by partially cooking and then refrigerating until time to "finish" the meal.

And, remember, the "Chicken Police" are out there watching ... FoodTV would NEVER air anything that wasn't safe in a "short tip spot" like this.

I wish I had seen it so I would know why she did it and what she said to do. Without that info - it's kind of like saying, "There was a wreck on I-30 yesterday morning that made me late to work ... why did it happen?"
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