"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Menu Planning > Today's Menu
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-05-2006, 04:07 PM   #31
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Texas college town
Posts: 192
The convenience food I use most often is instant coffee crystals. We got rid of the coffee maker when DH had a stroke and had to get over his "caffeine addiction" as part of his recovery.
__________________

__________________
TexanFrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2006, 04:09 PM   #32
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,531
Quote:
Originally Posted by FraidKnot
I didn't have the heart to tell him I don't really care for instant potatoes. So I'll use them to thicken some stew or something like that. Yes, I can certainly see them used that way!

Fraidy


If you have a bread recipe that calls for potato flour, you can grind up the potato flakes in your blender or food processor until they are as fine as flour and substitute for potato flour. I do it all the time.

As for mixes and prepared foods, I'd be hard-pressed to find any in my pantry. I've been cooking since I was about 8- or 9-years-old and rarely depended on mixes. I can usually prepare, from scratch, a dish that's boxed in about the same time as the box time.

Once in a while I will use a packaged rice/beans, etc. mix if a recipe specifically calls for it. Otherwise, no prepared foods here.

As a matter of fact, one of my cookbooks automatically falls open to a macaroni and cheese recipe because my daughter made it so many times as an after school snack.
__________________

__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2006, 04:36 PM   #33
Executive Chef
 
corazon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Native New Mexican, now live in Bellingham, WA
Posts: 3,859
Every so often I but Annie's shells and cheese. It's organic and tastes okay after I doctor it up a bit. After I eat, I always wonder why I didn't just make it from scratch.

We like the Near East Long Grain/Wild Rice. That is pretty much the extent of it, except when we're camping. I've never had Zataran's before...

To me, boxed or frozen meals are always a disappointment. Any time I've ever eaten them I end up thinking "I could have made this so much better." Time is an issue with many and I understand that. IMO it's just as fast to get a rotisserie chicken, make some pasta, throw some chopped veggies, a little pesto and call it done. 15 minutes tops. Or shred the chicken, brown it, add some red chile powder and lime, wrap it in a tortilla with some taco fixins - lettuce, tomato, avocado, cilantro and cheese.
__________________
"There are only two lasting bequests we can hope to give our children. One of these is roots, the other, wings." http://aidancallum.blogspot.com/
corazon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2006, 04:42 PM   #34
Sous Chef
 
PytnPlace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Ohio
Posts: 801
Zatarain's used to be the few convenience foods that I would buy - I doctored it up and loved it - but now I have lost my taste for that as well. I do admit to occasionally using A can of cream of something, or the occasional onion dip mix, not too often tho. One thing I do enjoy is the Salad dressing packets that I add Olive oil and vinegar too, and maybe a few more seasonings.
__________________
PytnPlace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2006, 04:53 PM   #35
Head Chef
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Spain
Posts: 1,167
I hate boxed mixes and the like but I've had reason to be thankful for them this year. My partner hates cooking, in fact to be honest he's terrified of cooking. But I've had a weird year for broken bones and other odds and ends of health problems. So I've been thankful for instant mash and things out of cans on more than one occasion. He did green beans out of a can heated up in butter and confit de canard out of a can for Christmas lunch. That and the best roast potatoes (from scratch) I've ever had.

I can understand the elderly cooking things from boxes and cans. Getting the enthusiasm and the energy to cook for one must be hard work at times. For lots of people getting on in years, canned and dried goods aren't to be sniffed at. It would either be those or whatever nourishment could be got from endless cups of tea.
__________________
Snoop Puss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2006, 05:27 PM   #36
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,763
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
I can understand the elderly cooking things from boxes and cans. Getting the enthusiasm and the energy to cook for one must be hard work at times. For lots of people getting on in years, canned and dried goods aren't to be sniffed at. It would either be those or whatever nourishment could be got from endless cups of tea.
Careful there, Snoop... YOU are gonna be a Senior citizen one of these days, I hope!

Canned and boxed foods are no healthier for Seniors thananyone else! WAY too much sodium in most things, for starters... and you can go on from there with the reasons NOT to use them.

Cooking for one os only "hard work" if you let it be. One person has as much right to a fine meal as a fanily, and it's not hard nor time consuming to prepare.

I know oodles of folks here in New York who are neither old nor single who eat take out, or go out to eat night after night after night mostly because they really don't know HOW to cook. They don't know how because they grew up in homes where dinner was pizza, or whatever brought in...It's the fault of "society" and the intense need of families to survive... so Moms have had to work pretty much nonstop since WWII.

Cooking good food is not hard work. I don't always feel like making a whole meal every night, but how much energy does it take to fry an egg?

Sorry, I didn't mean to pontificate.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2006, 06:39 PM   #37
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA,Florida
Posts: 3,833
ChefJune, perhaps cooking isn't the same passion for everyone that it is to you. Many have so many other things to do that it isn't possible to put the time and work into it. I try to keep my meals simply delicious and do much of it myself, but I certainly don't fault anyone for taking a few shortcuts, whether young or old.
__________________
Be an organ donor; give your heart to Jesus.
Exercise daily; walk with the Lord.
licia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2006, 06:58 PM   #38
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,763
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
I don't fault them, either ,Licia... i was poointing out that those boxes andconvencience foods are, more often than not, filled with excessive salts and other additives, that are particularly unfriendly to older bodies, and those who have health issues.

I think everyone over here at DC is pretty passionate about cooking, or theyd be on a different kind of bbs... maybe race car driving!
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2006, 07:14 PM   #39
Head Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,323
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune
Careful there, Snoop... YOU are gonna be a Senior citizen one of these days, I hope!

Canned and boxed foods are no healthier for Seniors thananyone else! WAY too much sodium in most things, for starters... and you can go on from there with the reasons NOT to use them.

Cooking for one os only "hard work" if you let it be. One person has as much right to a fine meal as a fanily, and it's not hard nor time consuming to prepare.

I know oodles of folks here in New York who are neither old nor single who eat take out, or go out to eat night after night after night mostly because they really don't know HOW to cook. They don't know how because they grew up in homes where dinner was pizza, or whatever brought in...It's the fault of "society" and the intense need of families to survive... so Moms have had to work pretty much nonstop since WWII.

Cooking good food is not hard work. I don't always feel like making a whole meal every night, but how much energy does it take to fry an egg?

Sorry, I didn't mean to pontificate.

If the change did not begin with World War II, at least the trend for the next 50 years began then. The gentlemen from Madison Ave. that promoted the altruism of Rosie the Riveter in the 40's, easily shifted back to the promotion of Corn Flakes after the war.

The youngest mothers of teen girls born on December 7.1941, the day of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, would be at least in their 80's today; most well past the century mark.
My mother, born in 1913, may she rest in peace, cooked mostly with Rice-a-Roni, cream of mushroom soup, and TV dinners during my youth in the 50's. Her mother's recipes were just not passed down to my Mom, who was a feminist college student, then a daring flapper, and then a home front warrior, and wife to an overseas soldier.
Someone, very soon, is going to get rich connecting us to the unadulterated alternatives to the grocery store boxes that my mother's mother would likely have shown her daughter.
__________________
"'Eat food, not too much, mostly plants." - Michael Pollan

Old bachelor cook
skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2006, 08:33 PM   #40
Head Chef
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Spain
Posts: 1,167
ChefJune, I've met plenty of elderly people in my time whose partner has died and whose children now live a long way away. Whatever the rights and wrongs of the care they receive from their children, these elderly people, a lot of them women, find cooking a proper meal for themselves, day in, day out, a chore. These are women who have produced what you would term proper food for their families but who now really cannot be bothered just for themselves. You may feel this is reprehensible and that they are failing in their duty to themselves, but it is a fact.

Many of these women are very proud, in my experience, and are trying to maintain their independence and do not wish to go and live with their children or to be a burden on them in any way. Who am I—or indeed, who are you—to tell them they can’t eat dehydrated potato? Boxed food may contain high levels of salt, but it is often enriched with vitamins and minerals. Above all, it is a source of calories. For the elderly, it may be essential. Certainly far healthier and a more varied diet than a fried egg every night.

Maybe care for the elderly is much better where you live. But I imagine that if you look around your own community, you will find people like I have described. Potato flakes rehydrated with boiled water from the tap weighs a lot less per meal to get home than a bag of real potatoes. However much an eighty-year-old lady might know that the real thing is better for her, it might be more than she can manage.

If you don't do it already, next time you go out, ask an elderly or sick neighbour if there's anything heavy they'd like bringing home from the shops. You might even have a neighbour you would like to "adopt".
__________________

__________________
Snoop Puss is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.