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Old 10-05-2007, 01:54 PM   #81
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Originally Posted by VeraBlue View Post
What's margarine???

Seriously, the only thing I'll use margarine for is greasing the bottom of a cake pan. Other than that one use, all I have in this house and at work is butter.

i still use butter for greasing a cake pan. gives the cake a nice flava
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Old 10-05-2007, 01:57 PM   #82
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this is how i get my butter. i take a baby food jar that is empty and clean and then i put heavy cream in it and let the lil kids in my class shake it up for a while untill it turns to butter and then i add a lil salt to it. tastes pretty good to.
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Old 10-05-2007, 02:05 PM   #83
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Originally Posted by keltin View Post

I literally rolled an ear of corn in a plate of greasy melted butter, and even though my corn was dripping with the fatty substance, it still had very little butter flavor. On the next ear, just a small pat of Country Crock and there was an explosion of buttery flavor with almost none of the greasy mess that butter created. Further, the mashed potatoes had far less flavor and a looser texture when made with real butter as opposed to Country Crock.

With all due respect, this means that you don't know what butter tastes like. How can real butter have less butter flavor than some "spread?"

Also, it is unlikely that butter made your potatoes "looser." Butter has very little water and CC has a lot (on a relative basis).

It's fine, obviously, that you like Country Crock, but it is not more buttery, flavor wise, than real butter.

Buy some Plugra butter at TJ's and try that.
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Old 10-05-2007, 02:10 PM   #84
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Originally Posted by keltin View Post
Vegetable Mono And Diglycerides are a fat that aid in emulsifying. Margarine!
They are technically fatty acids. They aid in the emulsification of the water onto the butter. They are not oils emulsified into the butter as you stated.

This is not margerine.
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Old 10-05-2007, 02:15 PM   #85
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Originally Posted by LEFSElover View Post
Husband sent me an email a year or two ago that revealed how margarine is a very close cousin to plastic. Wish I had it here, I'd post the link
If you search "margarine" at Urban Legends Reference Pages you will find the article. As they show there, the story going around the internet really isn't true.

As far as which we all prefer, I think most of the time we prefer what we grew up with. I grew up with real butter and prefer it. Some grew up with margarine and other spreads and that is what they prefer. Not exactly rocket science (and of course it doesn't always hold true). I know that to me, regular Country Crock tastes like salty grease. When I go to a restaurant and order rolls, they usually serve them with honey whipped margarine, and it is okay. As nasty as it sounds, I can even stomach an occasional spritz of "I can't believe it's not butter" spray on veggies. But I will always prefer butter.

Also someone mentioned leaving butter out. We always left the butter in a covered dish on the table and never had it go bad. It didn't really have time, as we probably went through a stick or two each week. I don't usually leave it out too long here (South Carolina) as it sometimes gets too soft in the summer.

Barbara
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Old 10-05-2007, 02:26 PM   #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
With all due respect, this means that you don't know what butter tastes like. How can real butter have less butter flavor than some "spread?"

Also, it is unlikely that butter made your potatoes "looser." Butter has very little water and CC has a lot (on a relative basis).

It's fine, obviously, that you like Country Crock, but it is not more buttery, flavor wise, than real butter.

Buy some Plugra butter at TJ's and try that.
With the same due respect, I tasted butter last night and it tasted like butter flavored grease. The greasy texture was far more “in your face” than the desired butter flavor.

Butter, per Tbsp has 11 grams of fat, 7 of those grams is saturated fat, and it has 100 calories (all from fat).....not to mention 30 mg of cholesterol. Country Crock per Tbsp has 8 grams of fat, only 1.5 grams of saturated fat, no trans fat, and 80 calories and no added cholesterol. Butter has 37% more fat per serving and 4.6 times as much saturated fat. Per Tbsp, it is painfully obvious butter is a greasy artery clogging dollop.

And I must say your Tarot cards aren’t working well today, because the mashed potatoes WERE “looser”, and it should be painfully obvious why. Simple math shows that if I put in 4 Tbsp of butter as opposed to Country Crock, I have added 12 additional grams of greasy, oily fat to the potatoes. I’ve got some left over if you want me to mail them to you.

IMHO, yes, Country Crock has a stronger buttery flavor than butter simply because, per Tbsp, there is less greasy mess to interfere with what your tasting.

As for Plugra Butter:

Regular butter contains 80% butterfat. The remaining 20% consists of water and milk solids. Plugrá European Style Butter contains 2.5% more butterfat and is slow-churned in a way that creates a lower-moisture, creamier texture than other butters.

Obviously, I’m not a big fan of the greasy fatty taste of butter, so I highly doubt adding even MORE fat to this mixture is going to help matters.
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Old 10-05-2007, 02:33 PM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
They are technically fatty acids. They aid in the emulsification of the water onto the butter. They are not oils emulsified into the butter as you stated.

This is not margerine.
And where do you think those fatty acids are coming from? The air? No, from vegetable oil (but they can also come from animal fat.....but this ingredient called out Vegetable). Specifically, oil is mixed with glycerin and heated so that that fat molecules will rearrange an align with the glycerin.

Margarine is the emulsification of fatty acids with water or skim milk. This Land-O-Lakes stuff is basically margarine, or as I said, a margarine blend.
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Old 10-05-2007, 02:43 PM   #88
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Originally Posted by keltin View Post
With the same due respect, I tasted butter last night and it tasted like butter flavored grease. The greasy texture was far more “in your face” than the desired butter flavor.

Butter, per Tbsp has 11 grams of fat, 7 of those grams is saturated fat, and it has 100 calories (all from fat).....not to mention 30 mg of cholesterol. Country Crock per Tbsp has 8 grams of fat, only 1.5 grams of saturated fat, no trans fat, and 80 calories and no added cholesterol. Butter has 37% more fat per serving and 4.6 times as much saturated fat. Per Tbsp, it is painfully obvious butter is a greasy artery clogging dollop.

And I must say your Tarot cards aren’t working well today, because the mashed potatoes WERE “looser”, and it should be painfully obvious why. Simple math shows that if I put in 4 Tbsp of butter as opposed to Country Crock, I have added 12 additional grams of greasy, oily fat to the potatoes. I’ve got some left over if you want me to mail them to you.

IMHO, yes, Country Crock has a stronger buttery flavor than butter simply because, per Tbsp, there is less greasy mess to interfere with what your tasting.

As for Plugra Butter:

Regular butter contains 80% butterfat. The remaining 20% consists of water and milk solids. Plugrá European Style Butter contains 2.5% more butterfat and is slow-churned in a way that creates a lower-moisture, creamier texture than other butters.

Obviously, I’m not a big fan of the greasy fatty taste of butter, so I highly doubt adding even MORE fat to this mixture is going to help matters.
Why is it so expensive in your area. Here its not to bad. $1.50 per pound for margarine and $2.00-$2.19 per pound for butta. If i were to buy butter at the costco or sams club its like $1.00 per pound

EDIT
i quoted the wrong message. dang it
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Old 10-05-2007, 02:48 PM   #89
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Originally Posted by keltin View Post
And where do you think those fatty acids are coming from? The air? No, from vegetable oil (but they can also come from animal fat.....but this ingredient called out Vegetable). Specifically, oil is mixed with glycerin and heated so that that fat molecules will rearrange an align with the glycerin.

Margarine is the emulsification of fatty acids with water or skim milk. This Land-O-Lakes stuff is basically margarine, or as I said, a margarine blend.
No it's not. It's butter with water added. Plain and simple.

Margarine is the emusification of vegetable oil, not fatty acids, with water. By law it must be made from canola, safflower, sunflower, corn, soybean, or peanut oil or a mixture of them.

Adding diglycerides to butter to enable it to mix with water does not make it margarine or a margarine blend.
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Old 10-05-2007, 02:54 PM   #90
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OHHH shoot i feel a debate commin on.
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