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Old 01-24-2007, 02:32 PM   #11
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First of all, I believe the word 'gourmet' is overused. I don't think of my self as a gourmet cook but anyone who knows of my interest in food and cooking refers to me as one.

Secondly, just check the International Gourmet Society's official list of foods you have to eat on a "regular basis" to qualify as a gourmet. That will solve the problem for you without question.

Oh, wait, there is no such list.

I'd be pleased to be known as a "...good, adventuresome, creative cook...".
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Old 01-24-2007, 02:52 PM   #12
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Very well said Andy M.
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Old 01-24-2007, 03:20 PM   #13
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I agree with you too Andy. The word "gourmet" has been tossed around so much no one even knows what the heck it means anymore. On a recent shopping trip I spotted a package of "gourmet hot dogs." Now what is a gourmet hot dog? These things are made with offal, and God only knows what else, so what makes them gourmet? I love calves liver and onions and veal kidneys sauteed til brown with onions but that doesn't make me a gourmand. Squab and quail are on my list of good foods too, still doesn't make me a gourmand. I agree that haggis sounds horrible, but in certain cultures there are a lot of foods we, as Americans, find horrible too. My parents came from Italy where the head of a cow or calf was a treat. It boiled on the stove for hours and when it was done the family members faught over who would get the eyes. That's enough to make me sick. Fortunately my parents didn't engage in that disgusting practice once they arrived in America. The adage "waste not want not" applies here. When you live in poverty sections of the world, you don't waste anything and judging from what goes into hot dogs neither do we here in America. I have heard of worse (worse than THAT?) but you get the point. To each their own. We all don't like the same thing, but please let's not get crazy with the word "gourmet." I see another blog coming. LOL
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Old 01-24-2007, 04:03 PM   #14
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Websters defines a gourmand as:

1 : one who is excessively fond of eating and drinking
2 : one who is heartily interested in good food and drink

I think, by those definitions, most of us here could be considered a gourmand.
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Old 01-24-2007, 05:21 PM   #15
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This is what the Wiki dictionary says: The first definition is the one I was aware of while the second is what GB's definition says. If the 2nd definition could be used for gourmet, the first definition could be used for glutton.


1. a person given to excess in the consumption of food and drink. A greedy or ravenous eater; a glutton. See gormand.

2. a person who appreciates good food. (Usage note: Some people feel this is an erroneous usage and should be gourmet for this sense.)
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Old 01-24-2007, 06:38 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
Very well said Andy M.
Exactly. Seems extremely silly to exclude someone because they don't like some foods.
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Old 01-24-2007, 06:42 PM   #17
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Gourmet/gourmand does not mean omnivore. It's OK to have a bit of discretion, however you want to define that.
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Old 01-24-2007, 06:45 PM   #18
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You are a gourmet if those that you like and love enjoy your cooking.
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Old 01-24-2007, 07:49 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
2 : one who is heartily interested in good food and drink
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
2. a person who appreciates good food. (Usage note: Some people feel this is an erroneous usage and should be gourmet for this sense.)
But, who's to decide what's good and what's not? That is subject to interpretation, perception, and personal preferrence.
With that being said then, should there be different levels for different types of gourmand/gourmet (i.e. uspcale gourmand, casual gourmand, etc.)? I wouldn't consider a person who loves foie gras and caviar to be the same type of gourmand as a person who loves smothered pork chops and mashed potatoes just because by definition, each person perceives that what they are eating is good.
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Old 01-24-2007, 09:17 PM   #20
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Why can't both of those be "good" though IC? I understand what you are saying about good being subject to a variety of factors, but I think that foie gras and pork chops and mashed potatoes can be equally good. There can be good foie gras and bad foie gras and the same with the chops and potatoes.
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