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Old 03-25-2006, 01:09 AM   #1
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Question Do you know food?

Here is a quiz to test your food knowledge!

1) I am cruciferal. Known to bring good luck to those who ingest me I am an herbaceous annual plant native to Europe and western Asia. Romans used my seeds as well as my leaves. As a member of the cabbage family I am related to watercress, mustard, and radishes. I can grow as high as twenty inches, but many times my tender baby leaves are harvested when they are about three inches long. My leaves are similar in shape to radish and dandelion, but our nutty bitter flavor is by far the best. I am a pretty perishable green and should be used in a couple days after harvest. Some people store me in a glass of fresh water (like cut flowers) that is changed daily, but most refrigerate me with a damp cover at my base. Raw I am a feature in many salads, a component in other salads, and combine magically with cheese (goat) and citrus (blood oranges). I can even add a zip to your best potato salad. Cooked I make a great base for fish or beef entrees, or wilted as a side dish. If your careful I can even be fried. Strong fiber, I am also a source Vitamin A, Vitamin C, and calcium. As a pharmafood I am considered to have the properties of a stimulant and a diuretic.

2) I am the pulp of a pod. I am native to India where my tree can grow to more than eighty feet tall. As a grown up I can easily reach the age of 90. My pod is sickle shaped and reaches a length of 8 inches. Seeds are imbedded in my sweet-acrid pulp. When first picked my pod is green and my pulp is white, but as a preparation for export I am covered with a thin film and left outside to air dry. This turns my pod brown and makes my pulp even darker than that. While I am most popular for my pulp, my hard glossy seeds are used as well. They can be ground into meal and used for cakes. In the countries where I am produced, my flowers and leaves are eaten fresh in salads, but I digress. My real fame originated from being a prime ingredient in Worcestershire Sauce but there is more to me than that. Other than being used fresh in numerous meat and fish dishes, I have been candied, dried, pickled, sauced, and used in chutneys. I have been added to soups, jams, sherbets, and can make a very thirst quenching beverage. Known to be a laxative, and aid to the liver and a stimulator of bilation, I am an excellent source of potassium, magnesium, and thiamine. I am a good source of iron and I also contain phosphorus, riboflavin, niacin, calcium, and vitamin C. Check me out, Iím worth it!

3) I am grown on every continent of the globe except America. My earliest cultivation took place in China. I was made popular by Roman authors in the first century, medieval monasteries in England, and by the famous author Geoffrey Chaucer who wrote about us in beautiful gardens. With my hundreds of varieties I range in color from yellowish-green to deep purple, and in size I range from a small cherry to a henís egg. Thereís even a dinosaur variety named after me. I contain one inedible pit in my center. I will ripen after picked, but this process is slowed by refrigeration. When I ripe I can be so sweet and so very juicy, public joy during my consumption must be refrained though often revealed by drippings on clothing. I am used dried in brandy, liqueur, jam, pudding, breads, cakes, compotes, oriental sauces, and a variety of other sweet and savory applications but am definitely best eaten fresh out of hand. I am fat free, low in sodium, and only contain 33 calories per piece. Often the mere mention of my name implies goodness and delight.

...any guesses? (I'll post more once someone gets these correct!)

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Old 03-25-2006, 03:42 AM   #2
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1. Arugula
2. Tamarind
3. Plums
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Old 03-25-2006, 04:14 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
1. Arugula
2. Tamarind
3. Plums
You are way too smart! Okay... here are more:

1) I am an orange of the naval variety. I am a freak, a limb sport, a genetic mutation. Nobody grafted me originally, I just appeared as a different limb on a regular navel tree growing in Venezuela. Even today, I am considered a chimera, which means I am genetically unstable. But Iíve been partying with some big wongs and bloods lately and you wanna talk unstable? Anyway here's what makes me cool. First, I often have variegated leaves, which is pretty neat compared to the bland old green leaves of a regular orange tree. But my internal color is what gives me star quality. Not bloody red, but pink, salmon pink, similar to a Star Ruby grapefruit. In the USA I grow best in California although I was first cloned in Florida groves, I lacked the rich flavor and bright color my western crop provided. Finally, my flavor can't beat. If you are lucky enough to find and peel me, youíll taste my wonderfully distinctive, rich, sweetness. Sometimes described as the "tutti-frutti orange" I am available late fall through early winter and I don't hang around long. Remember I am unstable, so grab me while you can cause you never know what Iíll turn into next.

2) I was a special effect before they were born. As the fruit of the Swiss Cheese plant, I am a member of the arum Lily family. I am the only edible philodendron. My large beautiful sturdy leaves make me a very suitable houseplant. Originally from Mexico (called Mexican Breadfruit, later known as the shingle plant) my survival techniques have allowed me to thrive around the world. We are very complicated to eat, but worth it. I will not ripen evenly! The green scales of my almost foot long lizard tail shaped body will loosen to expose my off-white colored, banana/mango/pineapple flavored spadix. When unripe, my oxalic acid and sharp calcium oxalate crystals will irritate and often numb the membranes of your mouth, tongue, and throat. Not to worry, you will only FEEL like you canít breath. To avoid this breathless possibility I am often wrapped in plastic so I will ripen more quickly and evenly. Excellent in fruit salads or eaten out of hand, I am also stunning in a cornucopia or fruit display.

3) I am probably most famous as a stick, although I have recently been seen in Buffalo with chicken parts. It all started when my wild ancestors were cultivated in the 16th century. Long considered a powerful aphrodisiac, my leaves were used by the Greeks to adorn the crown presented to victorious athletes. These stars also drank my wine. The Romans used me as a seasoning and as an elixir to aide digestion and soothe arthritic pain. Medieval magicians put my seeds in their shoes, hoping they would help them fly, but regretfully they did not. I am a fleshy, ribbed stalk that ranges in color from blanched white to dark green. My stalk, that can grow up to 16 inches, is my most popular part, but my leaves, seeds, and roots also are used. My most popular variety was cultivated in Kalamazoo, Michigan, in 1874. I was introduced to many consumers at local Michigan train stations, where I was handed out to passengers for free. In 1960 at Chicago's Ambassador East Hotel, I gained fame and recognition with bartenders. In 1897, I was featured as a muscle relaxer in the Sears, Roebuck & Co. catalog. Today, scientists believe that eating two of me a day will help reduce blood pressure. My crunch is created by the collapse of my numerous air filled cells. In the United States over two billion pounds of us are harvested annually. The average person consumes about 8 pounds of me a year. I am an excellent source of potassium and a good source of vitamin C, folic acid and vitamin B6.

...can I stump anyone?
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Old 03-25-2006, 02:17 PM   #4
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These three were actually much easier than the first three. But I'm going to see if anyone else puts up the answer.
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Old 03-25-2006, 02:19 PM   #5
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Plum?? We have a plum orchard right near us and lots of plum trees right up the road. Are you sure that's the right answer?
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Old 03-25-2006, 02:26 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdswife
Plum?? We have a plum orchard right near us and lots of plum trees right up the road. Are you sure that's the right answer?
It might be an older definition. But if you take out that first sentence, then plum is the only answer that fits.
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Old 03-25-2006, 02:27 PM   #7
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ahhhh, I see. Thanks IC
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Old 03-25-2006, 02:44 PM   #8
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Is the first one a blood orange?
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Old 03-25-2006, 11:55 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corazon90
Is the first one a blood orange?
You are close... but not 100%

Come on now, guys! I know IronChef can't be the only one to know these....

Keep guessing!
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