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Old 03-24-2008, 09:41 PM   #21
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You can run around naked, walk, and people got by for tens of thousands of years without computers,
I tried the naked thing but it didn't work out too well for me . . . It seems there are some crazy laws about that.
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Old 03-25-2008, 09:06 AM   #22
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I basically agree with you, Pancho, but I'm going to play the devil's advocate here.
We all wear clothes everyday. Shouldn't everyone be capable of making a dress and a pair of pants, if necessary? Most of us drive cars at least some of the time. Shouldn't we all be able to perform all the required maintenance and at least simple car repairs? What about plumbing skills? Don't we all use the facilities every day?
I agree on all of these things. People should be able to do all of these basic things or at least understand them. Yes you do need to be taught and that was sort of my point. These things are important even if today it is sometimes easier and more efficient to get others to do them for you. Still you never know when you will find yourself in a pinch and need to do something for yourself.

If you cant change a tire, cook a potato, sew a patch on your jeans or hold a hammer you are pretty helpless. Someone who could slaughter and cook a chicken, rebuild a transmission, tailor a suit and install a water heater would be exceptional. At risk of derailing this thread my opinion is that shcools could focus a bit more on providing basic life skills (home ec, autoshop etc) instead of test scores.

I am often amazed that the people working at the supermarket checkout dont know what basic vegetables are. They cant identify things like squash they just hold it up and look at you quizzically... makes me wonder what they grew up eating. How can someone who cant even identify basic foods that are not in a paper sack provide for themselves and their family?
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Old 03-25-2008, 02:01 PM   #23
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We have a young woman who stays with us often and we have come to affectionately call her our "rent-a-daughter". When we first met her, she was not interested in cooking whatsoever because her mother NEVER cooked and didn't even have a stove in the house (seriously).

We had known her awhile but the first time we spent time together was when DH and I volunteered to cook for one week at a youth camp. She was assigned as kitchen helper and did not have a clue. I assigned her things like peeling potatoes or making salad at first and could see she was watching every move I made in cooking the main items. By the second day she was asking questions and assisting on harder tasks, but needing lots of help. I had never seen a 20 year old who had NEVER had anything to do with preparing food. By the end of the week I could see that she really wanted to learn.

She came to live with us for awhile after and would often ask to help with dinner and even made a few of her own. The following summer she asked if I would give her a reference for a camp cook position for 2 months. When I got the reference called I found out it was a "head cook" position. She got it and while it was a struggle, she did very well.

Last summer when we went away for 3 months to cook at another camp she stayed at our house and had access to all my cookbooks and culinary school books. By the time we got back she was out-cooking me! I was so proud.

I think what a lot of it is boils down to is a passion to learn, no matter what your background. I agree in many cases "I can't cook" relates to "I don't want to cook"; however, in this case this person had absolutely no exposure to cooking and has turned into a really good cook with a little encouragement.
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Old 03-25-2008, 02:24 PM   #24
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We have a young woman who stays with us often and we have come to affectionately call her our "rent-a-daughter". When we first met her, she was not interested in cooking whatsoever because her mother NEVER cooked and didn't even have a stove in the house (seriously).

We had known her awhile but the first time we spent time together was when DH and I volunteered to cook for one week at a youth camp. She was assigned as kitchen helper and did not have a clue. I assigned her things like peeling potatoes or making salad at first and could see she was watching every move I made in cooking the main items. By the second day she was asking questions and assisting on harder tasks, but needing lots of help. I had never seen a 20 year old who had NEVER had anything to do with preparing food. By the end of the week I could see that she really wanted to learn.

She came to live with us for awhile after and would often ask to help with dinner and even made a few of her own. The following summer she asked if I would give her a reference for a camp cook position for 2 months. When I got the reference called I found out it was a "head cook" position. She got it and while it was a struggle, she did very well.

Last summer when we went away for 3 months to cook at another camp she stayed at our house and had access to all my cookbooks and culinary school books. By the time we got back she was out-cooking me! I was so proud.

I think what a lot of it is boils down to is a passion to learn, no matter what your background. I agree in many cases "I can't cook" relates to "I don't want to cook"; however, in this case this person had absolutely no exposure to cooking and has turned into a really good cook with a little encouragement.
I love that story, LPB! We never know what we can and can't do until we try. I agree with that last paragraph... and that concept goes for alot of other areas in life too.
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Old 03-25-2008, 02:31 PM   #25
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At risk of derailing this thread my opinion is that shcools could focus a bit more on providing basic life skills (home ec, autoshop etc) instead of test scores.
Amen!!!! Sadly, so many things like home ec, shop, music, art and even PE have been discontinued in school. I know that even when I was in school, there was no home ec or shop at the school I went to. It would have helped a lot if I had even had one semester of home ec.
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Old 03-25-2008, 02:33 PM   #26
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I think what a lot of it is boils down to is a passion to learn, no matter what your background. I agree in many cases "I can't cook" relates to "I don't want to cook"; however, in this case this person had absolutely no exposure to cooking and has turned into a really good cook with a little encouragement.
You deserve a huge pat on the back for this! Anytime a person takes the time and makes the effort to teach another, you change their lives!!!
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Old 03-25-2008, 02:48 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by LPBeier View Post
We have a young woman who stays with us often and we have come to affectionately call her our "rent-a-daughter". When we first met her, she was not interested in cooking whatsoever because her mother NEVER cooked and didn't even have a stove in the house (seriously).

We had known her awhile but the first time we spent time together was when DH and I volunteered to cook for one week at a youth camp. She was assigned as kitchen helper and did not have a clue. I assigned her things like peeling potatoes or making salad at first and could see she was watching every move I made in cooking the main items. By the second day she was asking questions and assisting on harder tasks, but needing lots of help. I had never seen a 20 year old who had NEVER had anything to do with preparing food. By the end of the week I could see that she really wanted to learn.

She came to live with us for awhile after and would often ask to help with dinner and even made a few of her own. The following summer she asked if I would give her a reference for a camp cook position for 2 months. When I got the reference called I found out it was a "head cook" position. She got it and while it was a struggle, she did very well.

Last summer when we went away for 3 months to cook at another camp she stayed at our house and had access to all my cookbooks and culinary school books. By the time we got back she was out-cooking me! I was so proud.

I think what a lot of it is boils down to is a passion to learn, no matter what your background. I agree in many cases "I can't cook" relates to "I don't want to cook"; however, in this case this person had absolutely no exposure to cooking and has turned into a really good cook with a little encouragement.
Very cool story!!!
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Old 03-25-2008, 03:03 PM   #28
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At risk of derailing this thread my opinion is that shcools could focus a bit more on providing basic life skills (home ec, autoshop etc) instead of test scores.
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Amen!!!! Sadly, so many things like home ec, shop, music, art and even PE have been discontinued in school. I know that even when I was in school, there was no home ec or shop at the school I went to. It would have helped a lot if I had even had one semester of home ec.
As someone who is married to a former schoolteacher now in administration, I have to say it's not "the schools" that focus on test scores - it's parents and politicians. They are the ones who demanded and passed the laws mandating practically constant testing - trust me, teachers don't like it. They went into teaching because they like *teaching*.

And school districts are not the ones who cut taxes to the point that many schools can no longer afford to offer "frills" like home ec, music, art and PE. Those subjects don't get tested, so they don't get taught. If your job depended on high test scores, you'd teach to the test, too.
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Old 03-25-2008, 03:17 PM   #29
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As someone who is married to a former schoolteacher now in administration, I have to say it's not "the schools" that focus on test scores - it's parents and politicians. They are the ones who demanded and passed the laws mandating practically constant testing - trust me, teachers don't like it. They went into teaching because they like *teaching*.

And school districts are not the ones who cut taxes to the point that many schools can no longer afford to offer "frills" like home ec, music, art and PE. Those subjects don't get tested, so they don't get taught. If your job depended on high test scores, you'd teach to the test, too.
Completely true! I'm pretty sure we all regard teachers as unsung heroes. And they certainly have the least amount of input as to what each year's curriculum and requirements will be. Still, I've seen blame laid upon teachers for all the problems in school systems so it's good that you point this out. I was just commenting on how sad it is that these things are no longer available to kids. It's just as sad that very few moms can be stay at home for any length of time so that they could help teach these things. But I don't blame moms for having to work to provide for the family's basic needs.
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Old 03-25-2008, 03:22 PM   #30
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Completely true! I'm pretty sure we all regard teachers as unsung heroes. And they certainly have the least amount of input as to what each year's curriculum and requirements will be. Still, I've seen blame laid upon teachers for all the problems in school systems so it's good that you point this out. I was just commenting on how sad it is that these things are no longer available to kids. It's just as sad that very few moms can be stay at home for any length of time so that they could help teach these things. But I don't blame moms for having to work to provide for the family's basic needs.
I agree, it is sad. I think teachers are the most obvious, accessible target for people's frustration with the schools. I did take a home ec class in school - I remember hemming a skirt in study hall once because it was the only homework I had that day Kids do need a well-rounded education.
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