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Old 02-03-2006, 11:17 AM   #21
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Just an FYI GB, I prefer the ones that are in the tomato based sauce to the ones in the molasses based sauce, but that is purely preference on my part. As to the flavour thing, well for me it was more about the texture. Bush's beans were more mooshy than I like. Heinz are firmer and less sweet.
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Old 02-03-2006, 11:36 AM   #22
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Well now you've gotten my interest up regarding the Heinz beans. Can someone please tell me what to ask my friends to buy for me in LGW or LHR or anywhere they may be traveling in England. I can go and search out the markets there too when I return to working, but for now, it's going to have to be a favor I ask of a friend or two. What's it called exactly? TIA.

Thrilled to see that Urmaniac13 and I are completely on the same page regarding Olive Garden or California Pizza Kitchen. DH and I have been to both, several times. I can say unequivocally, those times are in the past for good. We have never had one good thing in either. What's the big deal about (is beyond us). And yes Urmaniac13, there is no Italian food anywhere that is even close to the masterpieces they concoct in Italy. It's worth a trip there, seriously, simply to eat their cuisine. I have never in any of my travels, eaten like that, with such gusto and eager apprehension nor enthusiasm, and don't think that experience will ever be again, until I/we go again that is.

The experience I have had in England (per se) in the markets there, have been pretty much lack luster due to me not knowing what I should be looking for (to then) bring home here. I do know of two incredible finds that I knew I had to bring home from when I was a little girl and my best friends' parents were from England. Her grandma lived with them and everyday that I was there for breakfast, I was always given a cup of tea, milk and sugar, tea leaves in bottom of tea cup. Let me tell you what? I adored that tea. Never had anything like it since. Her grammie also made the most moist odd flavored cake I'd ever had. Very different for this little girls taste buds. Almost bland. If I could pin point the flavor I would but can't and she {my friend still} (to this day) can't help me with what her grammies ingredients were. I guess that's something that will be forever in my memory and also, forever saddly gone now. But, my favorite lunch eating over there was bar none peanut butter sandwiches on her grammies home made white bland bread, sliced thin, with Lyle's Golden syrup on them. And the desserts she made using Treacle. I own both in my pantry. When I want a good memory, I make home made white bread, not as good as hers of course, and spead it with Skippy and Lyles. Yumm.........takes me right back to Kathy and I on our horses or someone else's ponies, up in the mountains in Chatsworth California. "Those" were the days.
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Old 02-03-2006, 01:15 PM   #23
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I know that much of the food in restaurants here don't have exactly the same type in Italy, France, etc. But I have Italian relatives and they learned to cook while living there. Some of the dishes are very good and some have been Americanized. It really doesn't matter to me if one type food is true to the beginnings or not, as long as they are good. Sometimes they are improved over the original version - sometimes not. I like some of the things at Olive Garden, some at the french restaurants and some in Mexican, etc places. Due to availability of different ingredients the dishes would naturally be a little different. That benefits our country and others. From some who have travelled widely, I understand it is much easier to find American type dishes in other countries now. Also when visitors come from other countries they seem to greatly enjoy American food. It seems to be the best for both worlds.
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Old 02-03-2006, 02:18 PM   #24
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I travel a lot (and I am really grateful to have the opportunities to do so) and have done so since I was a very young child, when my Dad was in the army. We lived in Singapore and other points around the globe. I've travelled to Australia and the middle east, and to many European countries, including lots of the Greek islands... All I can say is: the dishes of each country are worth studying and trying to repeat in your own home. However, the authentic taste is often lost, simply because tomatoes grown here, instead of Italy for instance, do not have that special flavour... Breads never taste the same - 'French' bread needs to be made in France to taste authentic.

That's not to say that we shouldn't TRY to emulate the dishes... of course we should!

The one thing that I have always found difficult in the USA is the way that I am 'overfaced' with food! Smaller portions are the norm here, and I cannot bear an overloaded plate!
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Old 02-03-2006, 02:45 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreainDC
I agree with Jenny. I am married to a brit and lived there for a few years.

for sure they have us beat on:
sausages
bacon
baked beans in a tin (Heinz) for beans on toast

for fast food:
fish & chips
donner kebabs

there are a few other things we miss, but these are the big things available here that don't even begin to compare.
Wow, another fellow Mainer! I'm married to a brit too! My husband would agree about the bacon, sausage too. And he loves the heinz beans for beans on toast (Shaws sells heinz beans). He also misses a good curry, which we dont seem to have here in Maine.
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Old 02-03-2006, 03:54 PM   #26
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Ishbel, I bought a product called "Petticoat Tails" which remind me of something between a flat scone and shortbread. Are you familiar with these? They taste great and I would like to make them myself. Have you ever made them and if so, do you have a recipe? Thanks a bunch!
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Old 02-03-2006, 05:21 PM   #27
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Traditionally, petticoat tails is just the description for Scottish shortbread that has been 'fluted' around the edges before baking (said to resemble the edge of a lady's petticoat!)

This was a thread on Scottish shortbread that I started some time ago - there are a lot of good points made in the thread!
Shortbread

There is an illustration of petticoat tail shortbread (the triangular shaped pieces in the photograph) on the Dean's shortbread site The Dean Shortbread is soooooo much better than that awful Walker's stuff so loved by tourists to take home as a 'treat'....!
http://www.deans.co.uk/
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Old 02-03-2006, 05:45 PM   #28
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I am feeling very sheltered here!! Now I want to travel and see what the big deal is on the food. I've only eaten what's here. Born, raised and still in Texas
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Old 02-03-2006, 05:54 PM   #29
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I bumped up the thread on shortbread since the questions you answered were linked to that.
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Old 02-03-2006, 08:15 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amber
Wow, another fellow Mainer! I'm married to a brit too! My husband would agree about the bacon, sausage too. And he loves the heinz beans for beans on toast (Shaws sells heinz beans). He also misses a good curry, which we dont seem to have here in Maine.
Good to know about Shaws. Have been shopping at Hannaford's since we moved up here a few months ago.

I agree about the curry - loads of great options in England. Found a few places in DC we liked, but haven't stumbled across a favorite up in Maine yet.

Where are you? We're in Brunswick.
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