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Old 07-13-2005, 11:27 PM   #11
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I'm not sure if this is the right place to post this, but it seems appropriate, and the idea has occupied my mind for some time. I would love to teach cooking skills and techniques. But I don't have a clue how to go about whatever preperation is required for such a job. In addidtion, my current salary is required to pay the bills. I would imagine that some type of cullinary degree is required, along with certificates showing you know how to safely handle and prepare food. And then there would be equipment costs, etc.

I'm toying with the idea of getting together with select folks from this forum and creating an on-line cooking class. There are those people here who know every bit as much as I do, and sometimes more. I know a lot, but am continuously learning knew things all the time.

I sell my cookbooks, but that just doesn't give the same degree of satisfaction as watching someone grow and learn.

If anyone has any ideas, let me know.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 07-14-2005, 09:37 AM   #12
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How about teaching a cooking class at a local night school. In my, area local community colleges and schools offer a host of night classes for those who want to improve themselves. The list of courses runs the gamut from cooking to macreme.

That would enable you to share your skills with a constantly changing group of students, annointing an ever-growing percentage of the population with Goodweed-isms and cooking skill. Your influence would spread far and wide, those in the know would be wispering your name. And one fine day, the Food Network would knock on your door and beg you to be the next Emeril!

Can you say, "BAM!"?

Note to self: Stay away from Michigan's UP.
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Old 07-14-2005, 09:45 AM   #13
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Goodweed, it wouldn't be a paying job, but have you ever considered teaching these techniques to young kids? Most teen centers are looking for responsible adults to share their wisdom in order to further the kids' all-over knowledge.
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Old 07-14-2005, 10:39 AM   #14
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If you have cooking classes in your area, see if you can become an assistant, or prep person. No, it won't pay anything, but you'll learn a lot about teaching cooking, which is lot different than just doing it!
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Old 07-14-2005, 10:59 AM   #15
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Many years ago, I taught a Saturday cookery class at one of our FE colleges (think they're your 'Community' colleges, but not sure). It was called 'Men in the Kitchen' or something equally as naff... But it was in answer to the many requests from men that they run a course, specifically for men, and starting from scratch. Sort of - this is an egg, this is how to boil the egg. This is a cooker, this is an oven etc....

The course started at 10.00 am - and each week one dish was started first, in order to allow it to be ready for the students to be able to eat it at 1.00 pm as their lunch. Another 2 dishes were also prepared at each day's course. The course ran for 10 weeks.

So many men had NEVER cooked before their wives either left them or had died. I had men as old at 75 do a course. They loved it so much that the college also asked me to do a Saturday one-day course for November and the beginning of December to teach how to cook a Christmas lunch and traditional christmas cakes and Christmas puddings.

Sadly, I moved and no longer have either the time or inclination to give up a whole day of my precious weekend!
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Old 07-14-2005, 11:25 AM   #16
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What a fantastic course you must have run, Ishbel!
Our city has one-day classes such as those, not only in cooking, but flower arranging, topiary building etc...
I bet those men were so proud when they'd completed the course. Wonder if it got them any wives!
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Old 07-14-2005, 06:04 PM   #17
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jKath I don't know about the wives - but they'd be able to cook more than as boiled egg if they WERE lucky!

I also ran a course on 'gift wrapping'. The strangest thing I ever had to wrap was a barbeque (Weber) and to 'disguise' it, even though it was out of wrapping etc. I made it into a gigantic ball! The recipient didn't guess what it was!
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Old 07-15-2005, 01:02 AM   #18
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lol, just another casualty of "equality". it's great that women and men equally have the right to do as they please and choose their own destiny in their lives, but knowing that there is greater value in just doing your part as a team is the true benefit and the more wise path. there was never any shame in being a "housewife" in my family. in fact, it meant that home was mom's kingdom, and dad knew it well and loved her more for it. you can still be strong, and in charge, even if the only balance sheet is a checkbook. that seems to have been overlooked in the euphoria of the '70's when the sociologic oppression was lifted. usually, the middle road is the way...
still, an interseting article, but i think the nutritionist lisa young's comments are way off, or at lest, possibly taken out of context. quote "What's being lost is more than just a quaint skill, but an important family tradition that encourages healthier eating, said Lisa Young, a nutritionist and author of "The Portion Teller." She said that instead of baking potatoes and broiling flounder, parents are bringing in french fries and deep-fried fish. A dietof that sort of food can lead to obesity and other health problems, she said.

"It's higher in fat, higher in salt, higher in calories, bigger portions ... and it's lower in fiber and lower in vitamins and minerals," Young said." end quote

if we all ate like people did 70 or more years ago all of the time, we would then also need to exercise 6 hours a day to burn off the extra fats and calories from a diet that was meant to sustain a laborer who worked at a backbreaking job 12 hours a day, walked most places instead of taking a car, and still had to raise a family.
can you imagine rendering a hunk of pork fat every time you needed a little oil to cook?
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Old 07-15-2005, 06:46 AM   #19
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Good one iron! Truth be told the foundation of my cooking skills came from hanging out with my mom while she fixed lunch every other day. Oddly enough that alone is enough to put some one way ahead of people who didint recieve any oral instruction from their folks.
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Old 07-15-2005, 08:00 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lugaru
Good one iron! Truth be told the foundation of my cooking skills came from hanging out with my mom while she fixed lunch every other day. Oddly enough that alone is enough to put some one way ahead of people who didint recieve any oral instruction from their folks.
There's truth in what you say, Lugaru. My kids helped me in the kitchen all the time as they were growing up. And I helped my Dad, and my Grandpa. Invariably, the first meals were pancakes. Of course mykids made the "Worlds Best" recipe . I made Aunt Jamima pancakes from the mix. Oh, and we can't forget grilled cheese sandwiches and french toast.

As tehy grew, thier skills increased. They learned to make things like grilled cheese, some very unique sandwiches, boxed pizzas, hamburger helper, etc. Then came eggs and bacon, home-made soups, and gradually, as they grew into their teens, and into adulthood, they developed a knack for putting together their own recipes, experimenting with known techniques, and all became very good cooks in their own right. One of the four cooks proffesionaly and hope to go to a culinary arts school, and all because I let them help in the kitchen. Eric, the one who cooks at a local italian restaurant, is now learning to use his compact kettle barbecue.

I know that each of them has the knowledge and ability to cook well. They also know quite a bit about sound nutrition. I know they will not have to survive on Ramen Noodles for life .

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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