"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Menu Planning > Today's Menu
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-30-2006, 09:09 PM   #21
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: NW NJ
Posts: 1,884
I've been in a number (20 or more) of classes. Definitely go for the ones that you participate in. I found that there were a couple of instructors I liked and whose expertise and experience I respected. I always took their classes, and I came away with as much from their offhand comments on prep and process as I did from the course material.
__________________

__________________
"To be broke is not a disgrace, it is only a catastrophe." -- Nero Wolfe/Rex Stout
bullseye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2006, 10:14 PM   #22
Executive Chef
 
amber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Maine
Posts: 4,099
Does home economics class in high school count? Honestly that is the only hands on cooking I was ever taught formally, and other than that I learned mostly from working in the catering industry. Like most have mentioned though, if you have a good instructor and the class is hands-on, I say go for it.
__________________

__________________
amber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2006, 11:50 PM   #23
Head Chef
 
Chopstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,323
I'm very selective. I'll enroll only if I will learn something new skills-wise or learn a coveted recipe. Preferrably if it's hands-on too.

I've taken a few, including a crash classical course for chefs (150 hours + 100 hours internship) and several special multiple-day programs. Oh, and I also attended a half-day program at Le Cordon Bleu in Paris but we only got to watch the chef make everything.

I recently finshed a 5-day traditional Thai cooking course where we learned 15 different curry dishes from scratch. I also completed a 7-day Thai contemporary cooking course that included fruit and vegetable carving. I learned about strange new ingredients for the first time and discovered something about Thai food philosophy.

My advice is: Study the course description and dishes offered carefully. If you don't think you'll learn new skills and that they will simply show you how to follow recipe instructions, then maybe you're better off buying a book on the topic.

Of course if the cost does not matter, it's always preferrable that one is shown how to do things first, so at the very least, if you don't learn any new skill, what you gain is the confidence to make the dish yourself.
__________________
'Never eat more than you can lift.' - Miss Piggy
Chopstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 12:11 AM   #24
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Dove
Has anyone taken a real cooking class? Is it worth the cost? Is there a better way to learn? I'm thinking more about learning techniques rather than just recipes.

My wife sent me this link. A friend of hers is doing a "date night" cooking class for her anniversary.

http://www.cookstreet.com/cooking-wi...ooking-classes

Classes there are about $80 for a session. Several of them look interesting but I'm unsure if they are worth the cost.
I've taken the Classic Techniques: Essentials class at Cook Street. I loved the class, it is defintely hands on. It gives you a lot of good basic information as well as getting work as a class to cook a full meal and eat it at each class session. Each of the 4 sessions focuses on a particular topic. Chef Dale Eiden taught the class when I took it, and he makes it alot of fun. I've also been to one of their Taste 5 wine parties... makes for a good fun evening.

I'm retiring the first of the year, and I plan to take some more classes then.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 08:47 AM   #25
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
If taught by someone who teaches you actual techniques they can be invaluable. I searched around for one, and could only find home-ec type courses teaching a few "recipes" rather than focusing on the techniques which would open up thousands of recipes to that person. Ended up experimenting by myself with the CIA's textbooks and blowing through a few grand worth of merchandise to develop my basic skills.

I'd love to take a Thai course though! I hear a lot of places in Bangkok run cooking-school "Vacations" where you spend five days shopping at local markets and cooking. I'd also love to do this somewhere in the Sichuan province of China.
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 09:14 AM   #26
Executive Chef
 
Michelemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Suburb of Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,614
Send a message via Yahoo to Michelemarie
When I lived in Dallas one of our favorite restaurants would give a month worth of classes on Monday night, when the restaurant was closed. A small group of people sat in the kitchen and the chef prepared different dishes each night. He talked about technique, ingredients, etc. The wine was flowing from all directions. After the meal was complete, we all went to the dining area and it was presented to us as if we had reservations. We left with copies of all the recipes with our notes scribbled all over it. It was alot of fun and very informative.
__________________
Michele Marie
Michelemarie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 09:27 AM   #27
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Cook Street has a very fine reputation among Cooking teachers and in the culinary community, in general. Perhaps I am a tad prejudiced, as I am a Cuiinary Educator, but I think there is no better way to learn the techniques than by taking classes from qualified instructors. You can definitely ask the school to see the credentials of the teachers whose classes you are considering.

Even tho I teach cooking, I also take cooking classes. There is always something new to learn!

Have a ball. You're gonna love it!
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 09:29 AM   #28
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
I searched around for one, and could only find home-ec type courses teaching a few "recipes" rather than focusing on the techniques
Nick, where in MA are you? If you're in or near Boston, there are plenty of places to learn from qualified instructors.

Just because a course is billed as "Northern Italian" does not mean that techniques are not going to be taught. In fact, I have yet to take a course anywhere that did not emphasize the techniques needed to make the dishes in the class.

Not sure what you were looking for.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 09:37 AM   #29
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
I'm in North-Central Massachusetts, about an hour from everywhere (right at the northern tip of the Quabbin Resivoir).
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2006, 10:41 AM   #30
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Dove
Has anyone taken a real cooking class? Is it worth the cost? Is there a better way to learn? I'm thinking more about learning techniques rather than just recipes.

My wife sent me this link. A friend of hers is doing a "date night" cooking class for her anniversary.

http://www.cookstreet.com/cooking-wi...ooking-classes

Classes there are about $80 for a session. Several of them look interesting but I'm unsure if they are worth the cost.
Cook Street is a fine cooking school. I have taken 2 at our local Johnson and Wales and absolutely loved them. Most recent was Indian cooking--just excellent.
She would love to do it. It is fun to meet people taking the class and the chefs that do these are really great folks too.
And for learning techniques that you are unfamiliar with or cuisine that requires more understanding of spices, it is just terrific.
That is a very standard price I think. OUrs are more and some of the "boutique" classes are MUCH much more!!
__________________

__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.