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Old 07-10-2006, 07:26 PM   #41
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A couple of more weeks for me and I can try out my first pepper of the season!!!
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Old 07-11-2006, 07:58 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by marmalady
My garden's going great guns - already picked green beans, eggplant, lettuce/greens, cukes, tomatoes, carrots; have okra about 1 inch long, and green peppers and poblanosa are coming along.

However - some @)*$&#()*&#$###!!! worms got into my 6 baby cantaloupe and ruined them! Also had to toss a couple of cukes that were worm ridden. Oh, and all my squash plants got miners that killed them just as they were putting out baby squash. Mind you, here in the South, there are bugs that aren't even IN the bug books! I'd love to hear of some organic methods of bug control for critters like this.

Oh Bethzaring, where are you?
Hi There, I'm in the garden!! Thanks for asking, always glad to try n help!

My first and most important method of bug control is my thumb and index finger. Gosh I am glad I do not live in the South. I walk the garden in the morning while the goats eat their grain, to survey what's goin on. The garden is usually wet with dew so I do not touch anything for fear of spreading virus's. I will dust at this time because there usually is not any wind to blow the dust away and the dust sticks to the plants when they are wet with dew. I could be dusting with BT for the cabbage worms or with rotonone for flea beetles. Then I come back later when the plants are dry to do what ever needs to be done when handling the plants. Cabbage worms are too numerous and tiny to hand pick and BT works every time. Actually I dust a few days after I see the moths, even before I see the worms.

It sounds like it is too late for the squash and cantaloup plants. Next year, patrol the area daily and you can do surgery on the vine the instant you see the miners. Cut into the stem where you see the hole, or doo doo, and remove the rascals. I can't grow cucumbers because I have too many cucumber beetles. Rotonone will keep cucumber beetles off veggie plants. My cucumber beetles are under control if I do not entice more with cucumber plants. I am used to a powdered rotonone but I could not find any this year, so I bought a liquid that will have to be used in my hand held sprayer. What worms are in your cucks? Bug identification is very important, so you can tailor your approach to the bug.

As to my garden, I dug the garlic a few days ago and got the best crop ever. I will be able to sell some for planting stock on ebay again, closer to the time to plant them in the Fall. The potatoes grew some more so it looks to be a good potato crop. I am picking the neighbors green beans, they planted some to can but the wife is having back surgery this week. My green beans are flowering. Spinach is still doing great, am digging some carrots, the celery has really taken off, onions are doing okay. The corn is just making tassels and looks GREAT. And I am keeping a close eye on my winter squash plants, so far so good.
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Old 07-11-2006, 08:42 AM   #43
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Hello all,
The veggie and herb garden are both doing great. I cut two large clusters of broccoli last night, have been harvesting cukes for a while and have so many Japanese eggplant that I'm running out of ideas
Tomatoes are just starting to ripen and I can't wait to make a nice tomato, mozz and basil salad. (basil is doing well also).
Problems encountered so far, the okra plants died right off, the sage that I planted is NOT sage! Also the squirrels have stripped my peach tree for the second year in a row......
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Old 07-12-2006, 07:46 AM   #44
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mice eat broccoli?!?

Last week I started 12 broccolis in the greenhouse and yesterday morning, I found all the leaves, cotyledons actually, had disappeared. And I noticed some mouse turds near by. So I set a trap and caught a mouse this morning. I have never had this happen before, we usually do not have mice in the house though. I am astonished that a mouse would eat broccoli leaves, but the evidence is strong that they do!! I do not think the broccolis will live, so will have to start them anew. I usually start some brassicas for fall, in case my spring planted ones are too pooped out.
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Old 07-12-2006, 11:16 AM   #45
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Beth - The meeses have to get their greens, too! The weirdest thing I ever saw was in NJ, saw a fat woodchuck actually climbing over our 8 foot deer fence to get out of the garden and away from me!!! I was torn between being mad that he ate all my 'lopes, and laughing at the site! I fixed the woodchuck problem by getting some predator scent from Agway - they actually sell different 'types' for different pests - from fox, to coyote, to cougar!!! And boy did it work - didn't see another 'chuck the rest of the summer!

So you're thinking rotonone is okay? I've seen some organic folk who don't even use that. What about Sevin? And --- the 'BT' is?

The worms that got the cukes, squash and melons are all the same - very pale green and about an inch or so long, maybe half as big around as a pencil. It's almost a losing battle down here with the bugs. We do have ladybugs and saw 3 baby praying mantis in the garden last week, so I know that does help. But it's really heartbreaking to raise these plants from seed, baby them through their 'infancy', then see them demolished in 1 day. Sigh.
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Old 07-12-2006, 12:05 PM   #46
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Hey Marm, I just do not know what you got in the vines. Here is a link that may help you identify the bugger.
http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/gl_diseases...941369,00.html

I get my organic info from various Rodale books I have. Their list of acceptable controls are: insecticidal soap, pyrethrins, rotenone, BT (bacillus thuringiensis), ryania, sabadilla, and neem. Yes, I think rotenone is okay. I have let plants die rather than use Sevin or similar products.

Rodale suggests row covers to keep moths from getting to the vines. Do you think you have caterpillars, or worms? BT works on caterpillars. I use BT a lot on my brassicas.
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Old 07-12-2006, 07:39 PM   #47
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Great links! Tx. I'm not sure which one it is either, but will definitely do some dusting next crop. I was going to put in a 2nd crop, but think I"ll wait if all those buggy monsters are out there right now. Maybe start some in August, see what happens. This was a first year garden, anyway, so lots of note-taking about what to do and what not to do!
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Old 07-13-2006, 04:33 PM   #48
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Quote:
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That is so cool!
This is called the Three Sisters. The early European settlers got this idea from the Indians.
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Old 07-15-2006, 11:33 PM   #49
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All is going well here, in spite of my late start. I happen to love pickling cucumbers (I don't pickle, I just like the thin skins and small seeds), and they are really starting to produce. WE have another week or two until tomatoes ripen. I have a patio tomato and a plum tomato in barrels, then an Early Girl and some other variety (can't remember) in the ground. THe herb garden is nothing short of spectacular, but then it always is. I always have more herbs than I know what to do with. I have Hungarian hot peppers, and three cayenne varieties (the former to eat fresh, the cayenne and super cayenne are more for drying). My first batch of lettuce has bolted, and I'll be planiting a second bed as soon as this heat wave passes. Mustard greens and Swiss chard are gone, but (assuming I keep some level of energy) will be re-planted when I do a new lettuce bed.
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Old 07-16-2006, 01:21 PM   #50
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I picked my first green peppers last night. I can't believe how fast my cucumbers are growing though. I was just out there yesterday and today I went out and I couldn't believe my eyes........one had to of grown 3 inches or more overnight. I'm def. having the size of the garden increased next year. My tomatoes are monsters and they are right up to one another and the cucumber plant wants to take over the whole garden.
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