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Old 11-11-2005, 03:51 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by DugDbold
BTW, I have not gotten one single challenge to the "birthplace of the cheeseburger". That really surprises me.
Growing up in San Diego, I was always told that the cheeseburger started at "Oscar's." Like you said earlier, a lot of places probably lay claim to it! I do know that Oscar's was supposed to be the first to use Thousand Island dressing on a cheeseburger. Not sure if that is true, but that is what I have heard. I don't know if Oscar's is still even there. I haven't eaten there since I was a kid. They had great Roquefort (sp?) dressing there.

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Old 11-11-2005, 03:53 PM   #52
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In my province, we have Saskatoon Berries which are fantastic! The purple Saskatoons are about the same size as wild blueberries, but taste nothing like any other berry. I adore them!

Where are the Alberta folks to say they have the best beef?
Alix has sent me pictures of some pretty good Alberta beef. Oh, wait. That was "beefcake." Sorry!

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Old 11-11-2005, 04:17 PM   #53
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The gooseberries I've seen are almost the color of a Thompson seedless grape with little markings (like onions) on their skin. Are they the same gooseberries mentioned in this thread? I've never eaten any so have no idea what the taste is like.
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Old 11-11-2005, 04:59 PM   #54
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Originally Posted by licia
The gooseberries I've seen are almost the color of a Thompson seedless grape with little markings (like onions) on their skin. Are they the same gooseberries mentioned in this thread? I've never eaten any so have no idea what the taste is like.
I haven't had gooseberries in years, but I seem to recall that gooseberry pie tasted like rhubarb pie.

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Old 11-11-2005, 05:35 PM   #55
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Smaller gooseberries are better cooked - but there are many types, particularly those flushed a ruby colour, which are what is termed a 'dessert gooseberry' and can be eaten without cooking. Personally, I love the tartness of all gooseberries and grow them in my garden each year. We call them goozgogs, which is the name that young chldren give them!

Gooseberry fool is one of my favourite puddings - always think it's summer in a bowl!
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Old 11-11-2005, 08:10 PM   #56
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Gooseberries and Rhubarb

That also brings back memories. We used to grow rhubarb in the backyard and my grandmother would make rhubarb pie. Gooseberry pie was also on the menu occasionally. Bring on the sugar.....
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Old 11-13-2005, 08:18 PM   #57
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Cleveland has more clam bakes than anywhere else in the country. Fall is the big season for them. Many restaurants offer 1/2 bbq chicken 1 dozen steamed clams, clam broth boiled potato and corn on the cob for about $14.00.
We cooked our own in a 3 section pot when I was young. But everything tasted like clams.
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Old 11-15-2005, 09:32 PM   #58
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'Hock n Dough' is a traditional Northamptonshire dish that my Mum used to make back in England, You basically put the 'hock' (traditionally pig hock, but my Mum used pork chops) in a large roasting pan, you then put small peeled and halved potatoes around the meat, then you get strips of shortcrust pastry (about 4-5" wide and as long as the pan) and put them around the sides of the pan, so that half is up the sides, and the other half lies in the bottom of the pan. You then slice a large onion and sprinkle that all over the potatoes, meat and pastry, then you pour beef gravy into the pan and roast the whole thing...

...The onions turn the gravy into a rich, tasty oniony sauce, which soaks into the pastry, meat and potatoes at the bottom of the pan while leaving the pastry up the sides crisp. It's a meal in itself and used to be one of my favourite childhood meals.

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Old 11-16-2005, 09:23 AM   #59
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wow does that sound good paint!
i love those rich, hearty english meals.
the different textures of dough sounds great.
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Old 11-16-2005, 09:41 AM   #60
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