"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Menu Planning > Today's Menu
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-19-2008, 03:30 PM   #1
Head Chef
 
lulu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: England
Posts: 2,039
Lulu's SW England foodie notes

My Lombardia notes were well recieved, I could commit to something in England now too. Also I've got six months in Paris next year, so I could make it a trilogy if any one is interested?

__________________

__________________
In omnibus amor et iustum
lulu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2008, 04:59 PM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 4,764
Send a message via MSN to urmaniac13 Send a message via Skype™ to urmaniac13
Any lowdown on Devonshire cream which is heavenly heaped on a fresh scone?
__________________

__________________
urmaniac13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2008, 05:15 PM   #3
Head Chef
 
lulu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: England
Posts: 2,039
Well, thats a can of worms Sweets (hello!).

In this part of the world you put butter on the scone, then am then a big spoon of clotted cream, further west still they save calories, and put the cream on the scone with a spoon of jam on top of that.

There is fearsome debate over which is correct!
__________________
In omnibus amor et iustum
lulu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2008, 03:00 AM   #4
Head Chef
 
lulu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: England
Posts: 2,039
I'm all about dairy ATM. Milk puddings and cheese especially. I'm especially loving the two local goats cheeses. One is a fairly starndard chevre, the other is a hard cheese that mananges to be both goaty and quiet in flavour. And, milk puddings.....Spanish Creams, Lemon Possets, blamanges, I want them all! DH made a blamanche to a centuries old recipe a few weeks agp and it was divine! Absolutley wonderful.

But the big food news here is that we are in the frenzies stages of the elderflower season. The hedgerows and road sides of my village are peppered with women colecting the Queene Anne's Lace of elderflowers cordial. Later this year there is to be an elderflower competition, along idea the apple pie competition, and cordial and wine are both to be judged. I feel lost as I am possibl the only person in England to dislike the elder flower. A drop of elderflower in a gooseberry fool is delight ful, bu be yond that tey leave me somewhat cold. I trei making elderflower fritters a couple of weeks ago with the first open blossoms, this is very popular with the fodie-fashion set right now, but I thouht is tasted like fried fish with sugar. So, I have made one small bottle of cordial to submit but thats as ar as I go.

On the other hand, the roses are have a super year and on the shelves here are stacked freshly bottled rose petal jam. Nw, thats a flower I can eat all day. At the county fair the was a woman selling, among other hing, japonica jelly. I had no idea japonicas were edible in any form, but they taste just like one would expect, I lighter, less heady but perhaps more dreamy quince. Yum.

There are lots of local foods I've never tried, or tried once and turned my nose up at, like Dorset Knobs...funny dry things...but it'll be fun to look at those too.
__________________
In omnibus amor et iustum
lulu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2008, 08:22 AM   #5
Executive Chef
 
bethzaring's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Northern New Mexico
Posts: 4,599
lulu, I'm not quite sure what you are asking, could you rephrase what you are asking of us?
__________________
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. Margaret Mead
bethzaring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2008, 09:17 AM   #6
Head Chef
 
lulu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: England
Posts: 2,039
Sure....

I used to keep a journal here on what I was eating in Lombardia, the local foods the restaurants etc...

Now I'm thinking of keeping one for food here in the SW for a few months, and then possibly a Parisian one too....just noting foodie observations, restaurant recommendations for travellers, etc

But I've been away so long I'm not sure if anyone remembers the first one and would be interested in another similar thread on my glutony in Europe ;)
__________________
In omnibus amor et iustum
lulu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2008, 11:31 AM   #7
Executive Chef
 
bethzaring's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Northern New Mexico
Posts: 4,599
i'm sure there are many of us foodies here that would love to read of your journeys and eats..Paris eh? not bad..do you speak French?
__________________
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. Margaret Mead
bethzaring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2008, 12:07 PM   #8
Head Chef
 
lulu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: England
Posts: 2,039
LOL, glad I made more sense this time ;)

Yes, I used to speak fluent french, before the brain blip. I'm confident it will come back pretty quickly. Paris has been a big surprise to me too ;)
__________________
In omnibus amor et iustum
lulu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2008, 05:21 PM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
do it, lulu. at least I can eat vicariously that way.
__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2008, 11:13 AM   #10
Head Chef
 
lulu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: England
Posts: 2,039
Crumpets.

Nothing beats a crumpet. For us they are normally a cold weather food, just by habit but DH wanted some this weekend and there was a special offer on them so we bought instead of made, so as well as breakfast with marmite, honey and/or jam we've had them cheese and tomato topped this weeend.

Crumpets look like sponge, and to those foolish enough to try them not well toasted enough they taste and have the texture of sponge too but once toasted those holes become little butter and taste traps. For me they are the best past of an afternoon tea spread and one of the simplest but most wonderful delights of an English kitchen.

They are not at all hard to make either.
__________________

__________________
In omnibus amor et iustum
lulu is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.