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Old 03-22-2008, 06:25 PM   #11
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Thanks IC. He basically wants just crab, some "seasoning veggies" like onion, bell pepper, and herb/spices. He doesn't mind breading (flour/egg wash/panko) on the OUTSIDE of the crab cake, but basically NOTHING inside the cake as far as egg and a bread product of some kind. I have to mold the cake by hand, freeze it, then bread it and cook it. I've done a couple trial runs, and succeeded. I've also talked to my chef about what I did and the results.

I think he's wanting to do some really upper-crust haute-cuisine stuff, for the club's big century-birthday bash next week. A crab patty with basically all crab and no fillers might fit the bill.

Next week will tell the tale. I'll post what we did after we do the party.

On the question of "autolized yeast extract", would that be anything remotely similar to vegemite/marmite?
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Old 03-22-2008, 09:30 PM   #12
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Gosh Allen, am just a home cook but live in crab cake country, NOVA.

And the making of crab cakes here is close to a religion. You can surely make them with no binder and they will hold together and are great. Gotta treat them as gently as you would a new born baby but the meat does hold together.

Have driven many miles to find a great crab cake. There is a place in Baltimore that may come close to the best, but my preference was the cakes we got a few years ago, with my mil, at a hotel in Annapolis MD. Don't know if they are the same today.

Actually, and I am glad this is an anonymous site or I would have to find a wig and maybe some other stuff to disguise myself, but we prefer crab cakes with some stuff in it. Live in a world of crab cake purists who add nada, nothing, zilch to the crab cakes.

If it is just the two of us I will sneak in a bit of mayo, just a tad, some finely diced red and green pepper and a bit of onion. And then some Old Bay.

We like them that way.

Crab cakes, how to do the most wonderful stuff God has given us, is always an enigma.

Just my take on crab.







And done that way they are good, lump crabmeat and nothing but.
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Old 03-22-2008, 10:23 PM   #13
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Fisher's Mom:

I use the following recipe to make rice pilaf. It's the way my mom made it and it tastes very much like the Near East even though it does not have the extra ingredients.

Pilaf
1 C Rice, long grain
4 Tb Butter
2 Nests of Angel Hair Pasta
2 C Chicken broth

Thoroughly rinse and drain the rice.

Melt the butter in a 2-quart pan. Crumble the pasta nests into the butter. Brown the pasta in the butter. The butter and the noodles should turn a fairly dark brown (more than golden brown but less than burned). It is the browning of the butter and noodles that really gives the pilaf its flavor.

Add the rice and cook over medium to medium low heat for 3 to 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add the broth and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce to a simmer, and cook, covered, for 25 minutes. Don't open the pan to look or stir.

At the end of the cooking time, turn off the burner, mix the pilaf and let it rest in the pan (covered) for 5 to 10 minutes before serving.
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Old 03-23-2008, 09:14 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom View Post
It's available at a lot of Wal-Marts, regular grocery stores and Whole Foods here. The ingredients list is as follows: parboiled long grain rice, orzo (macaroni product made from wheat flour), salt, dried autolyzed yeast extract, dried onions, dried garlic, tumeric spice which imparts color. The rice and the orzo are no problem but where do I start when trying to figure out the amounts for the other stuff? And what the heck is autolyzed yeast extract? Is that a preservative? Any assistance as to where to start would be greatly appreciated.
I can't understand why you would like this stuff, what's wrong with ordinary rice (without the pasta, orzo) and fresh ingredients, unless you are only looking at the time element. (I'm wondering what '100% natural' really means, is it in the vein as a common cold is 100% natural?)

To produce rice 'similar' to your pilaf, sweat some onions in a little oil (add garlic if you think it necessary), then add the dry rice and stir so as to coat each grain with the oil. Then add boiling stock (vegetable stock would be similar to the autolysed yeast) in an amount the same as the quantity of rice (note 1:1 ratio, not any other that may be suggested). If you want to add turmeric for colour, add it now, peas or mushrooms would also be good. Close the pot with a well fitting lid (plus a double layer of kitchen foil for a better seal) and cook on a low heat (or in a low oven) for twenty minutes. DO NOT LIFT THE LID, the rice absorbs all the liquid, and after the 20 mins, just fork the rice through gently.

This is the basis of all the Middle Eastern pilafs, now you can play with alternatives, by adding spices (to the oil, before the rice) if whole, and fresh herbs just before serving. Fruit and nuts can also be added, as can meat, culminating in the multi layered Indian biryani, surely one of the world's best rice dishes?
HTH
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Old 03-23-2008, 10:33 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waaza View Post
I can't understand why you would like this stuff, what's wrong with ordinary rice (without the pasta, orzo) and fresh ingredients, unless you are only looking at the time element. (I'm wondering what '100% natural' really means, is it in the vein as a common cold is 100% natural?)

To produce rice 'similar' to your pilaf, sweat some onions in a little oil (add garlic if you think it necessary), then add the dry rice and stir so as to coat each grain with the oil. Then add boiling stock (vegetable stock would be similar to the autolysed yeast) in an amount the same as the quantity of rice (note 1:1 ratio, not any other that may be suggested). If you want to add turmeric for colour, add it now, peas or mushrooms would also be good. Close the pot with a well fitting lid (plus a double layer of kitchen foil for a better seal) and cook on a low heat (or in a low oven) for twenty minutes. DO NOT LIFT THE LID, the rice absorbs all the liquid, and after the 20 mins, just fork the rice through gently.

This is the basis of all the Middle Eastern pilafs, now you can play with alternatives, by adding spices (to the oil, before the rice) if whole, and fresh herbs just before serving. Fruit and nuts can also be added, as can meat, culminating in the multi layered Indian biryani, surely one of the world's best rice dishes?
HTH
Waaza
Well, waaza, I would have to say that the answer to your question could be a number of things. Time constraints I'm sure are up there at the top! If this is what she and her family likes who are we to question that? Count me in for liking it too! Though I very rarely make boxed things Near East Rice Pilaf is fabulous! I don't make boxed things because I have lots of time to cook and enjoy making things from scratch - not for all the other reasons.
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Old 03-23-2008, 12:46 PM   #16
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Would he be opposed to another type of seafood also being used in the cake? You could make say, a scallop mousse (just eggs, cream, and raw scallops in the robo coupe) and fold that into your crab mixture. Or you could even try making a crab mousse so the whole cake is 100% crab and fold that in. The mousse will hold the crab cake base together so you won't have to freeze it.
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Old 03-23-2008, 08:58 PM   #17
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Well, waaza, I would have to say that the answer to your question could be a number of things. Time constraints I'm sure are up there at the top! If this is what she and her family likes who are we to question that? Count me in for liking it too! Though I very rarely make boxed things Near East Rice Pilaf is fabulous! I don't make boxed things because I have lots of time to cook and enjoy making things from scratch - not for all the other reasons.

who am I to say what people should like, exactly, kitchenelf people can and will eat what ever they like, I just can't imagine anyone liking packaged dry produce over freshly made stuff. But, each to their own, vive la difference.
It was not a critique, just an unimaginable

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Old 03-23-2008, 10:15 PM   #18
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waaza - it's amazing how, when you don't make boxed things for a VERY long time and then you end up having "whatever" somewhere. You move the food around in your mouth, try to figure out what that peculiar flavor is, and then you realize it's preservatives THEN, you realize that when you ate this "whatever" years ago you never tasted it. Yes, homemade is sooooooooooo much better. I always make my salad dressings for that very same reason. There's just no comparison.

Happy Cooking!

Sorry, I didn't mean to sound so grumpy in my previous post - just defending one of my peeps
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Old 03-23-2008, 10:18 PM   #19
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waaza, you're right about home made being so much better. And maybe with all these awesome recipe suggestions, including yours, I'll be box-free in no time! Yippee!
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Old 03-25-2008, 10:49 AM   #20
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Here's an idea: Make your crab cakes with no binders. Add whatever aromatics you want such as onion, shallot, garlic, scallion, chives; then add garnish or other ingredients such as pepper, celery, ginger...whatever. Now...freeze the cakes for a short while so they hold shape. After they are firm from the freezer...wrap them in one layer of phyllo pastry.

This deviates from the classic "crab cake," but you can make a really nice presentation and add something else into the package to spruce it up further. Say you added spinach and a bit of dill on top of the cake before wrapping in phyllo. You could serve it with a lemon beurre blanc. Or, say you topped the cake off with smoked salmon before wrapping and served it with a tarragon cream sauce. And then, you could add ginger to the crab mix and top it off with chopped scallions mixed with cilantro pesto and serve it with a soya based sauce.

The options are endless.

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