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Old 03-29-2006, 12:54 AM   #1
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Strange Culinary Names. Can You Think Of Any?

Seeing the posting by Cara for Mecklenburger Coloured Cat triggered off a thought. As has been pointed out, cat is not called for in the recipe any more than you will find dog in a Hot Dog.

But there are many strange culinary names. For example, you will not find any Rabbit in Welsh Rabbit or any Woodcock in Scotch Woodcock. Neither are there any toads in Toad in the Hole. And no meat is to be found in Mincemeat, and there is certainly no duck in a Bombay Duck, nor in Cold Duck.

And you will not find many parts of a buffalo in Buffalo Wings, or much lemon in Lemon Sole. Nor will you find much of Richard in Spotted Dick!

Can you think of other strange names for edible dishes?

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Old 03-29-2006, 02:20 AM   #2
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Humm ... I have several recipes for Mincemeat that actually do call for minced meat. And Buffalo Wings refers to the supposed place of their origin (Buffalo, NY) - not an ingredient any more than Kansas City or Memphis BBQ contains any portion of Kansas City or Memphis in the recipe.

But, I will admit - some foods get strange names and even stranger connotations.
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Old 03-29-2006, 02:28 AM   #3
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Actually, Welsh Rarebit is the correct spelling, from what I can remember. (Taken from the literal terms - rare, and just a bit)

Although I've caught myself chuckling at the recipes for "Hoppin' John"....
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Old 03-29-2006, 02:47 AM   #4
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jkath - the way I heard it ... it really is Welsh Rabbit - the Rarebit is just to gussy it up and explain the lack of rabbit in the dish. According to a book I once read - the truth behind the name of the dish is this:

A Welshman went out hunting one day, promising his wife that he was going to bring home a big fat rabbit ... and several hours later around sunset she saw him walking home empty handed. So, she whipped up this dish and plopped it down in front of him and said, "Here's your Rabbit."
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Old 03-29-2006, 03:48 AM   #5
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For those of you who know what "Rocky Mountain Oysters" are, THAT misnomer takes the cake for me---never tried them but have heard "not bad" and I'll just take their word for it. Anyone know how that name came about???? Really would be curious.
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Old 03-29-2006, 09:43 AM   #6
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How about Johnny cake - very popular in hospitals. (I know, it was originally called journey cake).

Bubble and Squeak always intrigued me.
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Old 03-29-2006, 09:58 AM   #7
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a peanut is neither a pea or a nut, it's a legume
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Old 03-29-2006, 10:17 AM   #8
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"Spotted Dick".... I wouldn't go into any details why I think this is a funny name, however this is a sort of pudding popular in the UK, spotted because it is dotted with currants, and Dick refers to "dough"...
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Old 03-29-2006, 10:19 AM   #9
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Yorkshire pudding is an odd one... it's not pudding at all!

Fiddleheads is a funny name as well.
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Old 03-29-2006, 10:42 AM   #10
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Chicken oysters?
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