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Old 03-29-2006, 08:38 PM   #11
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Check this site for information about mirepoix. I tried to look it up earlier, Robo, but I chouldn't figure out how to spell it either. Thank's...I'll remember now.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirepoix_(cuisine)

Sorry, that site won't come up. Anyway, it's a French thing, onions, carrots & celery that can be varied in several ways.
To the best of my memory, the Trinity is onions, celery and bell peppers.
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Old 03-29-2006, 09:19 PM   #12
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Ma cherie! I agree with ALL of you------can't cook without a homemade stock-----even cook it with rice. And living in Kazakhstan they always set out their chicken carcasses and beef bones for sale because the locals make soup, stews, all the time. I've made some great stock here because of it. Plus, you won't find canned broth here---the Kazakhs would probably laugh if they saw it. And you be right about broth being the essence and heart of a good gumbo-------never even thought of using anything else. Never made a vegetable stock before but I'm going to hold onto my vegetable tidbits and give it a whirl. Spasiba!
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Old 03-30-2006, 05:08 PM   #13
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My husband considers me the queen of stock. I'll turn anything into stock. BTW, I learned that stock means it has bones in it; without bones it is broth or boullion. That said, I love to make roasted veggie stock (leeks, a couple kinds of onions, red bell pepper, celery, carrot, all roasted until brown then simmered). Do this with the veggies done outside over the coals and you'll have something worthy of any smoked ham/hamhocks stock. But my husband claims I'll turn anything into stock and then soup, and he isn't far from wrong!
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Old 03-30-2006, 07:58 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
I frequently make my own chicken stock, but have never mastered beef stock. I do have some beef soup bones in the freezer from a friend who has buys his beef on the hoof and has it butchered. They've been in there over a year...I guess I need to get them out and make my broth.
From what I've read, you put them in a roaster pan along with carrots, celery, onions, garlic, olive oil, tomato paste, S&P, and dried herbs of your choice, and let the whole thing caramelize. Then you remove the meat and vegies from the pan and put in a stock pot. Put water in the pan, put it on the burner and let come to a boil to deglaze the pan, then add the liquid to the stock-pot along with enough water to cover the bones and vegies, and let simmer for hours. Finally strain, discard bones and vegies, and simmer stock, uncovered, until reduced by half.
Connie can you get Kim to crack the beef bones for you? I have the butcher do that for me, my hammer is not the right size and I don't want a bone splinter in the eye, but after cracking I roast the bones and meat trimmings that I've put about 6 tab. of evoo over in the oven for about 30 min. I try to get it a nice carmalized golden brown. then I saute mushrooms til they stat to give off liquid and then I put them in a bowl and finsih sauting onions, add tomato, celery,carrots and a little garlic, then add that to the mushrooms and spread over the bons and roast to a rich golden brown for about an hour I watch carefully so they don't burn.I transfer dones and veggies to a strainer set over a bowl to drain off fat.then transfer to a large stockpot. Pour in enough water to cover by about 3 inches 6-7 qts. add som tomato paste and pepper corns bring to a boil and skim reduce heat and simmer uncovered 6-7 hours skim form time to time..Wow, that was long winded
All I really wanted to say was cracking the bones then roasting seems to give me a richer flavor.

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Old 03-31-2006, 04:10 AM   #15
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Kadesma,

You're making my kitchen smell great already!!!!!! I can't wait to use up the lame excuse for a beef broth that I now have to try your version---I'm really glad that you went into all the detail. Thanks again!
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Old 03-31-2006, 10:00 AM   #16
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I also hail from the "stock is best" camp. I always have chicken stock on hand, concentrated, then frozen in ice cubes. Right now, I have some seafood stock as well. I need to make some beef stock. I've got some bones, but need some more. I've also saved and frozen the gelatine that comes out of the roast beef from work. I'll make some beef stock, then add the gelatine at the end, this way I won't have to reduce it so much. I should get quite a load of beef stock. Now, I've just got to find some more bones. Those are hard to come by around here. I'll probably have to talk to my local butcher to get exactly what I want.
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Old 04-01-2006, 01:11 AM   #17
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I think that beef stock is the hardest and most expensive to make and almost impossible to get a good reproduction of commercially. Good beef bones for stock can cost as much as a steak sometimes, and the procedure to roast them, then simmer, can take ages (whereas for poultry stock you can get chicken leg/thigh quarters for a song, dump them in a pot with acoutrements, and get a great chicken stock. Or use the carcase of any kind of bird you've roasted). Beef, to me, takes a lot more work. Hubby makes the very best onion soup, so I make the effort to get him a good stock to begin with. Poultry stock of various kinds I have on hand most of the time.
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Old 04-01-2006, 12:39 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by expatgirl
Kadesma,

You're making my kitchen smell great already!!!!!! I can't wait to use up the lame excuse for a beef broth that I now have to try your version---I'm really glad that you went into all the detail. Thanks again!
Thanks expatgirl,
The first time I did this, I was frantic, trying to get everything done,worrying how it was going to taste..Nearly bit anyone who cameinto the kitchen..It does take time, but, when you're finished, it's well worth the time and trouble.
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