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Old 03-17-2009, 11:13 PM   #21
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meatball soup, which included vegies and pasta


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Old 03-18-2009, 08:22 PM   #22
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Sounds great. I'm new here. Is it possible to share a recipe for the corn beef. I've never made one before. What kind do I buy? Is it a flat cut?
Thank you in advance.
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Old 03-18-2009, 10:23 PM   #23
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I made the traditional American corn beef and cabbage dish with potatos and carrots. Unfortunately no leftover corned beef for sandwiches......
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Old 03-19-2009, 08:57 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Krystal View Post
Sounds great. I'm new here. Is it possible to share a recipe for the corn beef. I've never made one before. What kind do I buy? Is it a flat cut?
Thank you in advance.
Krystal - cooking a nice corned beef couldn't be easier. As far as cut, "flat cut" is leaner; "point cut" a bit fattier. "Flat cut" is usually a squarer piece that slices more uniformly, if you're interested in presentation, & some folks swear that the extra fattiness of "Point cut" makes it more flavorful. Personally, I've never seen a difference & buy either one, although I do shy away from pieces that are obviously very fatty. This is fairly easy since commercial corned beef is sold in clear plastic vacuum packing. As far as amount to buy, keep in mind that after cooking your piece of corned beef will be about HALF the size it is raw.

All I do is place the corned beef in a large pot & add cold water to cover the meat by several inches. If a little spice packet was included with the beef, I empty that in. (If not, no worries.) I then bring the water to a boil, & then reduce the heat to a simmer. Simmer for approx. 2-3 hours or more, checking after 2 hours for tenderness by piercing with a fork. When done, a fork should pierce the meat easily. Remove from the water & allow to rest for 20 minutes or so, then slice across the grain & serve as you wish.

Now this is just the way "I" do it. Many folks use a crockpot or roaster to cook their corned beef, so keep in mind there are other ways to do it that I'm sure are just as good.
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Old 03-25-2009, 05:45 PM   #25
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I usually look for corned beef round, which has less fat than the brisket. It's cooked the same way as described above - and the instructions are usually on the packet it comes in.
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Old 03-26-2009, 11:05 PM   #26
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Thanks Sharon, Any information regarding cooking of the Brisket, is of help to me, since, I had never made one before.
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