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Old 11-04-2006, 11:34 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkath
fish! Make fish! She likes it, and you can tell her it's reminiscent of your first date.

Yeah.... that wasn't really a good first date.
We went to Casey's. I ordered cheese capeletti, and she got her fish and fries. O there's an idea! Get her to switch from fries to mashed potatoes. Anyways.. we ate our meals, we talked, I gave her my big pile of gifts. (I brought her a big fluffy red bear, a made her a cd, I got her some chocolates, and I baked her some peanut butter cookies.)

When it came time to pay the bill, the server walked up and said here is your bill. I pulled out my debit card, and she said sorry, we don't take debit cards, but we have a machine at the back. I have a youth bank account so I could only take out $20 so my gf offered to pay the rest.

That was so dumb. :(

She just text messaged me. She's in the B class finals for speedskating.
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Old 11-04-2006, 11:35 AM   #32
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I think the biggest hurdle you have to cross is the mental one - as in her upbringing re: food.

I mean, heck, if she likes Halibut, there's absolutely no reason why she shouldn't also like Cod &/or Flounder/Sole. In fact, Halibut, Sole, & Flounder are in the same family. All these fish taste virtually the same & can pretty much be prepared in the same ways.

It's the mental block towards trying & possibly enjoying anything new that's going to be the problem. If you can nudge her past that, I bet she'd find a whole new world of great flavorful & healthy food opportunities open up.
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Old 11-04-2006, 11:36 AM   #33
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I agree, make fish.

Gobo, you seem a sweet and sincere young man. It is great tht you are focused and enthusiastic. I think it is great you are developing an approach of making effort to sustain a relationship. This bodes well for your success in the future.

It is good that your GF is fit and has sport, BUT, and I speak from experience here, exercise, -sport,physical endevour- makes many demands of one's body. It is EVEN MORE IMPORTANT to eat well when making these demands of one's body. YOU CANNOT CONTROL YOUR GIRLFRIEND, so it is good you are not trying to force her, but I think you have a good oppertunity here - I notice that you too have a few food likes and dislikes, how about using exploring ingredients and cooking together as a way to expand both your eating likes and dislikes as well as your practical skill as a cook? Your mother maywell be happy to let the two of you cook up a storm on your GF's weekends home, if you make something for your family to eat with you or later, and cooking together is a good exercise for working as a team as well as the nutrition benefits and good fun.
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Old 11-04-2006, 11:41 AM   #34
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I will definently try to get her to try other fish. And maybe one day, calimari. :D

That sounds good. I also might learn alot of interesting foods she might like when and if I get to work for my friends dad. He'll have an everchanging weekly european menu.

So it could work out.
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Old 11-04-2006, 12:00 PM   #35
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gobo, I have been reading each post on this thread and it occurs to me that many of your GF's problems besides her parents giving in to her whims; is that she may not have liked the ways most food were prepared by her Mum or Dad. I do think that she is more than likely spoiled by them but I also know what it is to have had food that was not prepared in the right way. Please try to open her tastes up; you may have to go slowly and the ones that suggested having her pick out foods are right!! Get her involved and show her that there are so many different possibilities. Just do not short yourself to cater to her; that is a very big mistake!! Been there!!!
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Old 11-04-2006, 12:20 PM   #36
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You know, this thread has really, once again, made me uber-appreciative of my parents' take on food.

They were both cooking different ethnic dishes long long before that sort of cooking became popular, & from Day 1, my brother & I were encouraged to try anything & everything. BUT, we were never forced. There was one rule - before we declined to eat something, we HAD to taste it. If, after tasting it, we still didn't like it, we were not forced to eat it. But we did have to take that taste. The absolutely wonderful things I would have passed up if I hadn't been made to take that "one" taste, makes me shudder.

In addition, while we were never forced - after that first taste - to continue eating whatever it was we didn't like, no "special" meal was then prepared for us. We didn't have to eat what was being served, but we didn't get anything else either. That's the way it was, & having been raised that way, both my brother & I have outrageously healthy eating habits - at least as far as variety goes. Remember - both moderation & variety are the keys to good health as far as eating goes!! : )
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Old 11-04-2006, 01:17 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
my brother & I were encouraged to try anything & everything. BUT, we were never forced. There was one rule - before we declined to eat something, we HAD to taste it. If, after tasting it, we still didn't like it, we were not forced to eat it. But we did have to take that taste. The absolutely wonderful things I would have passed up if I hadn't been made to take that "one" taste, makes me shudder.

In addition, while we were never forced - after that first taste - to continue eating whatever it was we didn't like, no "special" meal was then prepared for us. We didn't have to eat what was being served, but we didn't get anything else either.
That's exactly the way it was in my home growing up. I developed a love (nay, adoration!) for steamed artichokes when I was 9 because of this rule. I'm a bit of a picky eater myself in that I can't stand raw vegetables (it's more a texture than taste thing) or salads. But I eat the heck out of almost every cooked vegetable there is (and not cooked to death which sadly is the way a lot of vegetables are traditionally prepared in the southern U.S.) My diet is not lacking in nutrients. Now that I'm approaching 50 I'm very grateful I ate mostly nutritious meals throughout my life.

I also agree with the comment, aside from her parents completely indulging her alleged dislikes, it's possible it's the way the food is prepared at home that she doesn't like. My mother hated to cook. She took as many shortcuts as was humanly possible, including the dreaded "cream of mushroom soup" sauce. She never cooked fresh vegetables and very rarely frozen which are the next best thing. Always canned vegetables which are IMHO just awful. When instant mashed potatoes were introduced she was all over that! Ditto those "family size" frozen entrees, like sliced turkey (if you could call it turkey!) in gravy and salisbury steaks. I called her the Freezer Queen I'd eat the food because it's what we had but I basically learned how to cook in self-defense! Then I discovered I really enjoy cooking, which is a plus!

Ask your GF what she'd like but don't forget, you're cooking for others in her family, too, so it shouldn't be just what she likes. Have her go to the market with you. She doesn't sound like the type who has had all that much experience wandering through a grocery store. Getting her involved in the process just might help. Good luck!

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Old 11-04-2006, 02:24 PM   #38
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Peer pressure is so much an issue with young peoples eating habits. My neices used to eat EVERYTHING till their less enlightened school chums pointed out green was not cool. I had friends who went through school and uni never eating green but are coming round now as they approach their thirties.

Its an EXCELLENT point about the way te food is prepared. Most people don't know if they are over cooking or cooking "wrongly" because if they do not eat adventurously when they are out they have only their own cooking to compare it too.
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Old 11-04-2006, 03:00 PM   #39
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I don't know about peer pressure. Maybe these days, yes, but then I never was one to cave in I got along with every "class" (or clique, if you will) in high school. I wasn't a cheerleader but I got along with them. I didn't enjoy sports but I got along with the guys on the teams. I wasn't a geek or a nerd but I got along with them. I wasn't one to leave campus to go smoke weed but I got along with them. When people made fun of me for being a bit studious, because grades were important to me, I basically backed them down. I sure didn't let them tell me what was cool or not cool to eat! Ah, but that was years ago. I didn't let them tell me how I should dress or that I had to wear name-brand clothes, either!

There's really not a "wrong" way to cook. But (for example) I despise canned cream of mushroom soup. Were I to use canned mushroom soup to make a gravy I'd use golden mushroom. I don't like instant mashed potatoes. I don't like canned vegetables or fresh ones cooked to death (but neither do I want them so "tender-crisp" they may as well be raw).

I've mentioned my mom was all about frozen and prepared foods when they came around. So one Thanksgiving when I visited them I roasted cornish game hens for us, made real mashed potatoes, steamed some fresh broccoli. I'm not sure why I didn't make cornbread dressing; probably because there was just the three of us for dinner and despite the fact that when I cook for just myself, my elderly parents wouldn't have stored them in the freezer to eat later. I am not a baker so I did heat up some frozen dinner rolls. This is the kind of really no-fuss meal they'd been missing all those years.

Another time I went to the store and I got some lovely veal cutlets (sorry if you're morally opposed to veal), half cream, a block of Parmesan cheese. I made veal piccata and fettucini with a nice creamy/Parmesan sauce (aka Alfredo). I can't recall the vegetable. Dad was ecstatic... Mom stopped cooking like that back in the 1960s!

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Old 11-04-2006, 09:02 PM   #40
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Hello Goboenomo, Why not do halibut en papillotte? That way, everybody is ostensibly eating the same thing but you can make each papillotte individually and hence as simple or fancy as you choose. I wouldn't do mashed potato with halibut though. Too much white on the plate. You could do a julienne potato cake which has a nice crispy brown top, tastes just as good if not better than chips and is (probably) not as fat laden. If she eats rice, a better option still would be rice boiled with a tiny amount of turmeric and then drizzled at the end with some lemon juice to freshen up the colour and the taste.

Edited: have just re-read your first post and see that she doesn't eat rice. Scrap that for an idea, then!
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