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Old 03-16-2015, 07:03 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyshiepoo View Post
Well it was called Harvest Home Casserole. Belly pork with onion, green pepper (capsicum), courgettes (zucchini), mushroom. Thing is, it was cooked in a pan on the hob. I have always thought that when that sort of thing is cooked on the hob it is a stew. A casserole is cooked in the oven.

Anyone agree?

Anyway, tasted really nice did it with champ and buttered carrots.

A stew is bite sized pieces of vegetables with or without meat, submerged in a liquid and simmer low and slow.

Casseroles tend to have less liquid (could be eaten with a fork).
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Old 03-16-2015, 07:04 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I love the stuff and could easily eat it weekly.
If you like red cabbage that much, make it up in a big batch. It keeps in the fridge for months and nukes really well. It is also an excellent sandwich garnish. We usually try to get a big red cabbage when we want to make this.
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Old 03-17-2015, 01:44 PM   #13
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@ Andy M


From Wikipedia (we know they are always right don't we?)


A distinction can be made between casseroles and stews: stewing is a cooking process whereby heat is applied to the bottom of the cooking vessel (typically over a fire or on a stove), whereas casserole cooking is generally done in an oven to bake where heat circulates all around the cooking vessel.
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Old 03-17-2015, 01:54 PM   #14
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I'm surprised no one questioned St. Urho's Day.


https://www.google.ca/search?q=St+Ur...630&gws_rd=ssl


My Mom's b'day is the 16th--she is not Irish (although she is Swedish...maybe a bit of Finnish mixed in??? who knows), so we always celebrated St. Uhro's day. Even though she hates the colour purple (maybe I was swapped for another baby girl at the hospital), we still celebrated St. Uhro's Day--actually, we celebrate our b'days from my uncle's birthday on the 18th of February to my mom's on the 16th--it was a fun month +.
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Old 03-17-2015, 02:33 PM   #15
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I'm surprised no one questioned St. Urho's Day.
I live in Minnesota, and most of us here are familiar with it.
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Old 03-17-2015, 03:09 PM   #16
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I'm surprised no one questioned St. Urho's Day. .

Why no. It's a Legal and reasonable excuse to wear Purple
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Old 03-17-2015, 03:26 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyshiepoo View Post
@ Andy M

From Wikipedia (we know they are always right don't we?)

A distinction can be made between casseroles and stews: stewing is a cooking process whereby heat is applied to the bottom of the cooking vessel (typically over a fire or on a stove), whereas casserole cooking is generally done in an oven to bake where heat circulates all around the cooking vessel.
Sorry, this definition makes little sense to me. By this definition, a steak in a skillet on the stovetop is stewing and a roast of beef in a roasting pan in the oven is a casserole.

Also from Wikipedia:

Stew - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Casserole - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 03-17-2015, 03:42 PM   #18
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Actually, I think Wyshie's is a pretty accurate description of the difference and the one I see most often, however, I think it also needs to be qualified as follows. This definition is from Delia Online:

Stewing is done on the top of a cooker with heat being applied directly to the underneath of the pot; while casseroling takes place inside the oven with heat circulating all around the pot. In both cases the meat is cut up fairly small and cooked in a liquid.

Of course, here in the US, a "casserole" can also be defined as any baked one pot meal, which only adds to the confusion.
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Old 03-17-2015, 03:50 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Actually, I think Wyshie's is a pretty accurate description of the difference and the one I see most often, however, I think it also needs to be qualified as follows. This definition is from Delia Online:

Stewing is done on the top of a cooker with heat being applied directly to the underneath of the pot; while casseroling takes place inside the oven with heat circulating all around the pot. In both cases the meat is cut up fairly small and cooked in a liquid.

Of course, here in the US, a "casserole" can also be defined as any baked one pot meal, which only adds to the confusion.

I think focusing on the heat source is missing the point.

A stew is a more liquid dish, vegetables and sometimes meat in a liquid (broth or gravy). Similar to soup but more hearty and bigger pieces of food in the liquid. A stew can be cooked in the oven or on the stove top, similar to a braise.

A casserole is less liquid. Think baked macaroni and cheese or baked ziti and broccoli or chicken and rice casseroles.
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Old 03-17-2015, 04:00 PM   #20
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I would really hesitate to call something a casserole if it wasn't baked, but a stew could be baked or cooked on a stove top or over an open fire.
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