"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Menu Planning > Today's Menu
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-14-2006, 01:50 AM   #11
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Sodium Alginate and Calcium Chloride. I've only been playing around with it, haven't used it on any dishes in the restaurant yet but it's cool stuff. Basically, the sodium alginate is a gelling agent that can be used at cold temperatures. When combined with a calcium chloride solution, you can create spheres of liquid, and when the spheres are immersed in the solution they gel on the outside but still retain their liquid in the middle. It's pretty neat stuff.
__________________

__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2006, 02:21 AM   #12
Sous Chef
 
Lynan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 501
Send a message via MSN to Lynan
IC recently I followed a food challenge at another site where the challengee made beautiful litle pearls out of tea! They looked like a pile of glistening golden caviar, just beautiful. Maybe you know where I mean, instructions included!
To be honest though, I would never want to eat any food produced that way. I am aware that the solutions required to form these gems are not unsafe, but it is not natural. May present well, but I would rather have au naturale!! With butter please! lolol
__________________

__________________
In the book of life, the answers are NOT in the back.
Lynan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2006, 02:43 AM   #13
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
They probably have this, or something similar to this which I bought as well:

Chef Rubber

You could always use a squeeze bottle with a small tip but the "caviar" wouldn't be uniform and it would take forever in day to make them.
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2006, 04:14 AM   #14
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 496
I've developed a newfound love for gray salt over kosher. I'm not sure why.


Beyond that, I'm going through sort of an Asian phase right now (I frequently go through theme phases with BBQ being the only true constant), so I'm using a lot of soba noodles and various sauces (fish sauce, oyster sauce, etc.) that I wouldn't normally use.
__________________
Poppinfresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2006, 08:08 AM   #15
Executive Chef
 
boufa06's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Volos, Greece
Posts: 3,467
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDP
What do you do with them?

JDP
Fermented beans or tau cheo from soya can be added to fish, vegetable stews and sauces in Chinese cooking. Since they are salty, there is no need to add salt to the dish.
__________________
The proof of the pudding is in the eating!
boufa06 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2006, 08:30 AM   #16
Executive Chef
 
YT2095's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Just left of Europe and down a bit.
Posts: 3,875
Send a message via MSN to YT2095
Asafeotida would be mine, although it`s not exactly New to me, I did discover it about a year or so ago, and haven`t found anything new that`s quite as interesting yet.
gimme time :)
__________________
So long and Thanks for all the Fish ;)

YT2095 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2006, 09:05 AM   #17
Executive Chef
 
Michelemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Suburb of Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,614
Send a message via Yahoo to Michelemarie
Proscuitto! I don't even know if that is how you spell it - but i thought I didn't like it and I "accidentally" tasted it and now I love it! I try to incorporate it into things I am making!
__________________
Michele Marie
Michelemarie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2006, 12:21 PM   #18
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 4,764
Send a message via MSN to urmaniac13 Send a message via Skype™ to urmaniac13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michelemarie
Proscuitto! I don't even know if that is how you spell it - but i thought I didn't like it and I "accidentally" tasted it and now I love it! I try to incorporate it into things I am making!
Very very close indeed, Michele, it is prosciutto!! I also had thought I wouldn't like it either, and the quality is also crucial. Prosciutto di San Daniele is the absolute best, followed closed by Prosciutto di Parma. I only eat these two. The generic brand of prosciutto only tastes of a "salted raw pork".
__________________
urmaniac13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2006, 04:11 PM   #19
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,794
Herbes de Provence, from Penzeys. A spice blend with rosemary, lavendar, thyme, marjoram, savory, it is great on baked chicken, pork chops, tilapia, and I made a beef stew with it that was the best ever.

Next time, I am buying a 4oz. bag instead of the little shaker bottle.
__________________
I just haven't been the same
since that house fell on my sister.
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2006, 04:27 PM   #20
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 210
My son came back from a short holiday with his usual little gifts for me. This time I got a packet of roasted Wattle Seed and a packet of Adudjura (bush tomatoes). Both Australian bushtucker foods, in case you didn't know. I've been hankering after both for ages, but they aren't easy to find.

It's only been a couple of days since I had them, but already I'm addicted to the Wattle Seed. Sort of chocolate-hazelnut flavour, that made delicious muffins yesterday!
__________________

__________________
daisy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.