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Old 12-13-2006, 06:46 PM   #1
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What's your coolest new ingredient?

What is your coolest new thing you found in the market that your your experimenting with? With Trader Joe's opening I have found a Red Hawiian Salt, Black Lentils, black truffle oil, Spanish chorizo. and red and yellow Tai curry pastes. I have been having great fun with all of them.

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Old 12-13-2006, 06:55 PM   #2
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Dehydrated coconut milk in powder form. You just add some water (you can adjust the amount to make it more dense or thin). Flavour wise it is surprisingly close, almost identical rather, to the coconut milk that comes in a tin. And you can use whatever the amount that you need at that time without the rest going bad after being forgotten at the back of the fridge...
I find it very, very handy!
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Old 12-13-2006, 07:15 PM   #3
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My daughter had a Pampered Chef party, which I did not attend. But, to help her out, I bought several useful looking items from the catalogue.
I ended up with some high quality utensils, and a spice which I will keep on hand from now on.
It's called Cinnamon Plus, and contains cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, allspice and grated orange rind. The aroma is so wonderful, you'd like to dab some behind your ears, and the taste really is "Cinnamon Plus".
Add a shot of rum to whatever you're fixing, and you've got it going on. You wouldn't believe what it does for a peach pie.

The Pampered Chef, Ltd.

I can just imagine it in eggnog.
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Old 12-13-2006, 07:45 PM   #4
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That sounds great. I did not know until Alton Brown of Good Eats had a show about cinnamon and I found out what I thought was cinnamon was actually Casasha bark ( spelling?). I found a bottle of McCormick spice with the name Saigon Cinnamon and it is ground. I'm assuming it is real cinnamon but do not know for sure. It has a stronger aroma and a sweeter taste. You could almost eat it on toast without the sugar. There is a huge diffence between it and what you normally find as " ground cinnamon" or the short stick versions.

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Old 12-13-2006, 08:04 PM   #5
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Try some tau si - fermented black beans. Wonderful little things!!
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Old 12-13-2006, 08:37 PM   #6
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What do you do with them?

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Old 12-13-2006, 10:34 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
It's called Cinnamon Plus, and contains cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, allspice and grated orange rind. The aroma is so wonderful, you'd like to dab some behind your ears ....
As it happens, Constance, I've read that men are very attracted to the scent of cinnamon. Seriously.

Hmmm. It would be a heck of a lot cheaper than Jessica McClintock!

Lee
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Old 12-13-2006, 10:59 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QSis
As it happens, Constance, I've read that men are very attracted to the scent of cinnamon. Seriously.

Hmmm. It would be a heck of a lot cheaper than Jessica McClintock!

Lee


mmmm - this is a great question. I wish I could add to this thread but it's been so long since I've found a really NEW ingredient. I can think of combinations of ingredients but I've still used those for several years. WOW - I'm going to have to go on a hunt for a new favorite ingredient. I've got some white truffle oil in my cabinet that I've never used - may that will be it. Maybe I'll do a risotto or some mashed potatoes using it - if anyone has a good suggestion for it my ears are wide open!
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Old 12-14-2006, 12:50 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf


mmmm - this is a great question. I wish I could add to this thread but it's been so long since I've found a really NEW ingredient. I can think of combinations of ingredients but I've still used those for several years. WOW - I'm going to have to go on a hunt for a new favorite ingredient. I've got some white truffle oil in my cabinet that I've never used - may that will be it. Maybe I'll do a risotto or some mashed potatoes using it - if anyone has a good suggestion for it my ears are wide open!
I have used white truffle oil in Bagna Cauda. Right time of year in your part of the world for that great Piemontese dish.

(Oops, Im assuming you are in a cold zone in the States!)
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Old 12-14-2006, 01:12 AM   #10
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Forgot to mention my latest ' play around with' ingredient.
Smoked paprika. Just love the suff. It enhances so many dishes that need ' warming' and I most often use with pork, fish, soups and potatos. There are two varieties, hot or sweet. Both are superb and I highly recommend you give them a try!

So far this summer I am pouring Thangkwa Priaowan ( Thai sweet and sour relish) over everything! Hubster loves it on his rice but I dont know if the Thai's would approve of that. This relish is based on a rice wine vinegar, sugar and water syrup with cucumber, carrots ( instead of water chestnuts, I dont like them), spring onions and chilli. Garnished with coriander leaves.
Goes beautifully with sate, Thai fish cakes, spring rolls etc.
I know its not really an ingredient as such..but its fast becoming that in our kitchen!!
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