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Old 07-17-2006, 07:54 AM   #51
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I still think it'd be nice if schools offered (or made mandatory) life skill classes, including cooking, sewing, small home repairs, balancing a checkbook, etc. would benefit all kids today. Even if they just taught the basics of cooking.
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Old 07-17-2006, 08:07 AM   #52
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When you say a first of second date and cooking together

may explain why you think younger women aren't interested in cooking. What they really are not interested in is being alone with a man they don't know well. It would not really be safe or smart to put themselves in that situation. I would certainly not recommend that any woman (young or old)
go to the home of a person they don't know well when they will be alone. It is much safer to date in public places, and saying they don't cook may be easier to say. Just my take on it.
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Old 07-18-2006, 07:10 PM   #53
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As an American who has spent a fair portion of her adult life in Europe, I WHOLEHEARTEDLY say it's cultural. Life is so fast in the US that PEOPLE IN GENERAL don't cook anymore. Not just young women, but young men, mothers, fathers, everyone! Life just isn't as fast and competitive in Europe. (Warning, sweeping general statements ahead, not directed to ANYONE here.) In the US, kids don't take the time to learn at their parent's elbow in the kitchen (I never did). It's also not presented as a passing on of cultural or familial tradition by parents (for me it wasn't - I mean, why pass on the recipe when you get it in the box). It's just not important - getting to soccer practice is (in my case basketball practice). My husband has a cookbook (handwritten) of his mother's Turkish and Armenian recipes and it would never have even occured to him to have passed up the opportunity to learn how to make these from his mother. Likewise, he is teaching our daughter, as well. We eat dinner together every night except the two hubby is teaching late at the uni. Every family that I know in Europe eats dinner together EVERY SINGLE night. Every family I know in the US (mostly cousins, sisters, etc.) RARELY eat together. I truly believe that if more focus was put on FAMILY TOGETHERNESS like it is in Europe, growing and grown children would see the benefit of a home-cooked meal and follow the lead. JMHO.
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Old 07-19-2006, 03:20 AM   #54
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I echo Velochic's comments. (Not about the US - I'm not an American and therefore prefer NOT to make comments!)

BUT, even though my family are now grown and flown - my husband and I still eat dinner at the dining table, properly laid and we TALK... I think that's probably why we're still married after 30 years!

Nowadays, sadly, the UK seems to be following the lead of the US in eating on the hoof.
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Old 07-19-2006, 04:53 AM   #55
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Regarding the post of Velochic, I have noticed the similar trend also in Italy (or in Rome, more particularly...). Prepackaged readymade foods are so readily available in supermarkets and I see so many people buy piles of these stuff. Also I have encountered many other people (like wives of friends of Cris) who are less than impressive at cooking and their kids growing up on those blandly prepared or readymade packaged foods. It seems that also here, only those who have special interest and passion in gastronomy / good eating choose to do creative cooking these days. To me, very sad, especially in such food heaven like in Italy
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Old 07-19-2006, 11:12 AM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
I echo Velochic's comments. (Not about the US - I'm not an American and therefore prefer NOT to make comments!)

BUT, even though my family are now grown and flown - my husband and I still eat dinner at the dining table, properly laid and we TALK... I think that's probably why we're still married after 30 years!

Nowadays, sadly, the UK seems to be following the lead of the US in eating on the hoof.
Well, I'm in the U.S.--Texas to be exact--and I agree wholeheartedly with what you have said. And, I'll go a step further--we here in the U.S. do everything to the "supersized" level--it's why a lot of Americans are overweight and have diabetes, heart problems, and high cholesterol. And, we're teaching our kids to be like that. Very rarely do you hear of families sitting down to dinner together anymore in this Country. Here in TX, the big family get-together is bbq (again, fatty foods served in overabundance). My boss just returned from France and talked about how small the portions of food were and how there are no 24 hour fast food places. We could take lessons from that.
Honestly, I have been a single parent and I have been in the position where hub cooked the meals because I worked late. I have just now become really interested in cooking (was always a good baker though). I try to cook healthy meals for us. I'm glad my son is learning the same, although he eats a lot of fast food.
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Old 07-19-2006, 11:42 AM   #57
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I am 28 and have been cooking my entire adult life ( as well as much of my childhood). I make healthy and homecooked meals for my family and friends everynight. Also, as a result of this, many of my other young friends come to my house weekly for cooking classes, where I teach them just how simple it is to do some of this stuff. Many of my friends grew up without a mom cooking much, but because of my love of cooking they have become interested. If you like to cook, it kinda has a way of affecting those around you =0)
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Old 07-20-2006, 03:34 AM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txoldshirley
Well, I'm in the U.S.--Texas to be exact--and I agree wholeheartedly with what you have said. And, I'll go a step further--we here in the U.S. do everything to the "supersized" level--it's why a lot of Americans are overweight and have diabetes, heart problems, and high cholesterol. And, we're teaching our kids to be like that. Very rarely do you hear of families sitting down to dinner together anymore in this Country. Here in TX, the big family get-together is bbq (again, fatty foods served in overabundance). My boss just returned from France and talked about how small the portions of food were and how there are no 24 hour fast food places. We could take lessons from that.
Honestly, I have been a single parent and I have been in the position where hub cooked the meals because I worked late. I have just now become really interested in cooking (was always a good baker though). I try to cook healthy meals for us. I'm glad my son is learning the same, although he eats a lot of fast food.
I know what you mean about the HUGE portions in the USA. I have always found that I am what we in Scotland call 'over-faced' with food on my plate in the US.... I can only eat a small portion of the serving, and then find myself apologising profusely for leaving so much.... We are not used to the absolutely full-to-overflowing generous portions!
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