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Old 09-09-2014, 08:30 AM   #51
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We too can make our own "official" Italian subs at home. We can purchase those chopped pickles with chopped tomatoes and a large jar of the chopped hot cherry pepper right at our supermarket. And we can go into any sub shop and buy the sub rolls. For a party, we can order them by the bagful. And just about every household has the red vinegar and olive oil along with the herbs. A stop at the deli counter or your favorite sub shop will fill your need for all the cold cuts and cheeses. Most of the sub shops that I know of, order all their bread needs from Pantidosi in Malden. They are a huge bakery that services other food purveyors. They make the subs to their special specifications and lengths.
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Old 09-09-2014, 01:32 PM   #52
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No Subway's here in my town. We have privately owned sub shops on almost every corner. And the majority offer hot subs. Meatball, eggplant, sausage, egg and pepper, etc. Then you have your choice of American or Italian cold cut ones. Oil and vinegar on the cold ones with a shake or two of Italian spices. I always get an eggplant with extra sauce and grated cheese. My favorite veggie.

Over in the city of Everett, someone made the following observation to me one day. There is a sub shop on every corner and right next door or across the street is a hair salon. Sure enough, the last time I went through there, they were right. I am not sure what the connection may be, but it is interesting.
The workers in the hair salons go to Subway for their lunch and working women who get their hair done in their lunch break pick up a sandwich on the way in and eat it under the hairdryer. If it wasn't Subway it'd be something else.
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Old 09-09-2014, 01:47 PM   #53
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We too can make our own "official" Italian subs at home. We can purchase those chopped pickles with chopped tomatoes and a large jar of the chopped hot cherry pepper right at our supermarket. And we can go into any sub shop and buy the sub rolls. For a party, we can order them by the bagful. And just about every household has the red vinegar and olive oil along with the herbs. A stop at the deli counter or your favorite sub shop will fill your need for all the cold cuts and cheeses. Most of the sub shops that I know of, order all their bread needs from Pantidosi in Malden. They are a huge bakery that services other food purveyors. They make the subs to their special specifications and lengths.
Just about anybody in a town of any size can do that. What's the big deal?
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Old 09-09-2014, 03:35 PM   #54
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Just about anybody in a town of any size can do that. What's the big deal?
Maybe so, but where I live, the choices are far fewer than in bigger towns. There are great cheeses and cold cuts that just aren't available here. To get really good cheese, I have to cross into Canada. Same with really good varieties of salami, and other sausages.

I get better blueberries than many though. It' all a trade off.

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Old 09-09-2014, 04:16 PM   #55
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Maybe so, but where I live, the choices are far fewer than in bigger towns. There are great cheeses and cold cuts that just aren't available here. To get really good cheese, I have to cross into Canada. Same with really good varieties of salami, and other sausages.

I get better blueberries than many though. It' all a trade off.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Well, that's why I said "of any size." If you live in a rural area, then of course you won't have the same choices. But Addie speaks as if only Boston has specialty cheeses and cold cuts, particularly Italian, which is silly. We have an Italian restaurant in town that sells house-made fresh mozzarella and freshly made pasta sauces at the weekly farmers market. And the supermarkets carry pretty much any salumi or charcuterie I want.
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Old 09-09-2014, 04:25 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Maybe so, but where I live, the choices are far fewer than in bigger towns. There are great cheeses and cold cuts that just aren't available here. To get really good cheese, I have to cross into Canada. Same with really good varieties of salami, and other sausages.

I get better blueberries than many though. It' all a trade off.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
We are very fortunate here in Boston. We can get just about any Italian hand made cold cut. And we also have available to us major imported Italian cold cuts. Up on Route #1 there is a man who makes German and Italian sausages. Well worth the price. About a month before a major holiday like Easter, Christmas, you have to place an order with him. When we walk up to the deli counter in a supermarket, they usually have a section of just imported Italian cold cuts. In this town Pizzagaina is the major dish for Easter. It is filled with Italian cold cuts, cheeses, hard boiled eggs, etc. The Pirate's FIL makes all his own cold cuts. TP is going to see if he has been making them this year and if so he is going to ask him for some so I can make one. It is very expensive to make. And a lot of work. It is usually the tradition that all the women in the family get together on Good Friday and help make it. The following will give you an idea of what is involved. Some families will ask a priest to come to the home and bless the pie.


Pizza Gain Aka Pizzagaina, Pizza Rustica, Italian Easter Ham Pie Recipe - Food.com
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Old 09-09-2014, 04:30 PM   #57
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Well, that's why I said "of any size." If you live in a rural area, then of course you won't have the same choices. But Addie speaks as if only Boston has specialty cheeses and cold cuts, particularly Italian, which is silly. We have an Italian restaurant in town that sells house-made fresh mozzarella and freshly made pasta sauces at the weekly farmers market. And the supermarkets carry pretty much any salumi or charcuterie I want.
Boston is the closest port to Europe. But if you want Italian, then head to New York. We have a very active and alive Little Italy. But I am sure that you can find Italian food in New York than you won't find here in Boston. Boston is not the only city that has a very large Italian population.
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Old 09-09-2014, 04:43 PM   #58
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Boston is the closest port to Europe. But if you want Italian, then head to New York. We have a very active and alive Little Italy. But I am sure that you can find Italian food in New York than you won't find here in Boston. Boston is not the only city that has a very large Italian population.
You should specify "closest US port to Europe". Saint John's, Newfoundland and Halifax, Nova Scotia are closer.
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Old 09-09-2014, 04:45 PM   #59
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You should specify "closest US port to Europe". Saint John's, Newfoundland and Halifax, Nova Scotia are closer.
I stand corrected. You're right.
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Old 09-09-2014, 04:56 PM   #60
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Boston is the closest port to Europe. But if you want Italian, then head to New York. We have a very active and alive Little Italy. But I am sure that you can find Italian food in New York than you won't find here in Boston. Boston is not the only city that has a very large Italian population.
We've been over this before - Maine has a port closer to Europe than Boston, but it doesn't matter because that's not how shipping works. The Port of Hampton Roads, where I am, imports much more tonnage from Europe than Boston does because we have a deeper harbor that can handle the mega-container ships that are in use today. So it's likely that the Italian meats and cheeses you enjoy were sent up the coast on a train from here.

And you don't have to be Italian to appreciate the food.
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