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Old 10-11-2006, 03:20 AM   #11
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verablue mentioned using salsa. i've done that from time to time, tossing the whole salad with some salsa and olive oil. it's good.

what we usually use every day though, is olive oil and balsamic vinegar. balsamic vinegar is nowhere near as acidic tasting as other vinegars and is rather on the sweet side. we never tire of it.

balsamic vinegar is rather pricey when compared to other vinegars, but not particulary so compared to ready-made dressings. costco has a large-sized bottle at a reasonable price, and the quality is reasonable too.
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Old 10-11-2006, 04:55 AM   #12
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One of my favourite no effort salad dressings is squeezing an orange over the salad. Easy, tasty, fresh!

I also second the suggestion of a really good quality extra virgin olive oil. The taste range is broad, so try a couple of brands if you have a choice. Some people might yell "sacrilege!" at me but I cannot see why you good not infuse it with some garlic gloves. To see if you like it with the garlic drop a clove in to half a jar of the oil (so you have your bottle un polluted for when you want it plain) and leave it. You could also roast garlic in the paper and add the seet past to the salad dressed with the evoo or orange juice or whatever else you like.


I know you are not keen on making something yourself but if commercial products are not to your taste then you might have to, and salad dressings are not hard and can usually be done simply by shaking the ingrediants in a jar in which you'll store it - so you dont even have to get a fork and bowl dirty!
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Old 10-11-2006, 05:21 AM   #13
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I would try yoghurt or cream with some herbs in it, pepper and salt.. maybe a pinch lemon juice with it...

Or a vinaigrette of mild aceto balsamico and Olive oil
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Old 10-11-2006, 08:40 AM   #14
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What about leaving out the dressing all together? Maybe add some ingredients like dried cranberries or orange segments along with nuts or seeds to give a little more of a flavor punch? Also try crumbling some cheese on top like a blue or feta.
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Old 10-11-2006, 09:06 AM   #15
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there is a Teriyaki cream type sauce, it`s largely based on sesame and soy sauce. it`s not at all overpowering in an acidic way.

Tahini paste (like peanut butter but with sesame seeds instead) is also a Very nice base for a dressing, as it will be as thick and creamy or as thin as you like it depending upon the consistancy you`re after, you just use More or Less of it.

I also am not a great lover of Overly acidic dressings and such, Parmesan grated up is also nice in salads too, feta cheese cubes in the olive oil with chili is nice, maybe even throw a few olives in there also :)


edit: also sourcream and garlic chives maybe a few finely ground capers or baby dill pickles in it too is quite nice if you already like Ranch :)
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Old 10-11-2006, 01:00 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YT2095
there is a Teriyaki cream type sauce, it`s largely based on sesame and soy sauce. it`s not at all overpowering in an acidic way.
do you have a recipe? *yummy*
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Old 10-11-2006, 01:54 PM   #17
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A friend of mine makes a salad and really, no dressing is needed. Everything is cut up approximately the same size - small cubes - so if you want to use a soup spoon you can (that might help if your hand shakes). She does not dry the lettuce, just cuts it. When she chops the tomato she puts the juice in there too. She salts, peppers, a little garlic powder (just a tiny bit) and tosses everything. It's wonderful. Because it's wet the salt, pepper, and garlic stick to everything. I like a good squeeze of lime on it too. You could also put a drizzle of balsamic on it. She uses lettuce (any kind you want but she seems to always use iceberg, cut up appropriately), tomatoes, cucumbers, carrots, radishes, spring onions, and sweet peppers, usually green. Everything is cubed rather than sliced. It's an excellent, refreshing salad.
  • If you'd rather drizzle with a bit of dark sesame oil that would be good too!
  • Use some chicken broth or even beef broth if you'd rather not use vinegar.
  • Puree some roasted red peppers (maybe flavor with some teriyaki or soy sauce, some lemon or line juice, garlic powder, and anything else that sounds interesting and use that as a dressing.

I'm all about the EVOO too - shave some Parmesan in there and little else is needed.
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Old 10-11-2006, 02:05 PM   #18
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I don`t no :(((

I used to Buy it from Tescos (a super market in the UK) and they don`t stock it anymore :(

you CAN make a convincing one with the Tahini paste though (that`s what Ive been doing), but you need to heat a pan Very hot and add the paste, Toast it but don`t let it burn (sounds Odd for a paste I know, but it does happen), I take that off the heat add Light soy sauce about half the amount at you used in tahini paste, fine garlic grans and ginger powder, then add rice wine (mirin or saki) to equal the amount you have in the pan, stir well!
you can bottle this and keep it in the fridge for months, just shake well before you use it.
I Could add an emulsifier to this that would preclude having to shake the bottle, but it messes with the consistancy.
that`s about as convincing as I can make it since the stopped stocking it, if I could get hold of another bottle, I`de have the stuff sent to a better equiped Lab than mine and have it taken appart so I could make it all the time 100% :)
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Old 10-11-2006, 02:32 PM   #19
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Jay, you have not given us much to go on about what you like. And you have stated that your hand shakes so I have no idea what your knife/ kitchen preparation skills are. Or what you know about cooking.

Would certainly go with EVOO.

If you can tolerate the acidity, a finely diced (concasse) of tomato would be nice.

Could always toss in some capers, or finely diced gherkins, or diced or mashed anchovies.

Lemon zest would give it a bit of nice flavor without the acidity.

As for spices would toss in some fresh or dried tarragon, or chervil.

And sorry, I forgot, chives would be great.

Normally am very careful adding salt and pepper to salad, but with the lack of acidity would add them, and perhaps generously.

(Generous with S&P for me is not all that much).

Just a few ideas, hope this helps.
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Old 10-11-2006, 03:29 PM   #20
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Here is my favorite dressing. Very light. It only takes 3-4 teaspoons to dress a whole heart of romaine that has been sliced perpendicular to the ribs. Top with a good sprinkling of shredded parm-reg or pecorino-rom. A few small butter croutons goes well too, along with some slices of grilled meat (tender beef, chicken, etc.). If you add any extras just drizzle another teaspoon or so over those. I eat this stuff by the pound during the week. It's based on a CIA recipe, and similar to the one used by Thomas Keller. I've included my own personal notes as well.
Quote:
Herb Vinaigrette

This is an all-purpose vinaigrette that works well with cold salads, warm salads, and as a liquid to marinate with. Use a neutral salad oil with a thick viscosity such as Canola. The fruity flavors of extra virgin olive oil or thin oils like peanut will not give the correct flavor balance or properly cling to the dressed items. A non-virgin "light" cold-pressed olive oil can be substituted. Herb/spice infused salad oils can work well if the infused flavors work well with the other ingredients. Red wine vinegar can also be substituted for the white wine vinegar.

1/2-C White Wine Vinegar
1-t Dijon Mustard
1-T Minced Shallot
1 1/2-C Salad Oil
1 1/2-t Kosher Salt
1-t Sugar
1/4-t Freshly Ground Black Pepper
1-T Minced Fresh Chives
1-t Minced Fresh Tarragon
1-t Minced Fresh Parsley

Place the vinegar, mustard, and shallots in a jar. Secure the lid, shake well, and let rest for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, add the rest of the ingredients and shake vigorously to emulsify the vinegar mixture and oil. Let rest for at least one hour for the flavors to develop. Shake well each time before using. Makes 2 cups.
This is amazing with some slices of tender beef from a charcoal grill! I sometimes add some crumbled bacon too. It's what I had for lunch today!
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