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Old 06-04-2007, 06:56 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
One of the Cook's Illustrated chefs was on TV this morning fixing cook-out food. He was making French potato salad, and the news person commented that it was good to use the vinaigrette, because one wouldn't have to worry about the mayo spoiling.
He said according to their research, it's not the mayo that is the culprit in spoiled potato salad, or the eggs either. It's actually the potatoes. Because they grow in the ground, they contain bacteria that causes the spoiliage.
hmm no
the bacteria would be killed in the cooking process
but once that happens, the potato which are mostly starches become a prime breeding ground for new bacteria
in order to conteract this you must change the PH
by adding acid
mayo generally does not contain enough acid
and it does contain eggs
well real mayo does
regardless it will spoil just how quickly
my suggestion is keep your potato once prepared in a heavy ceramic* container in the refrigerator as long as possible and do not let it sit in direct sun
and discard after a few hours
most of the food illnesses are caused becuase people pack stuff up and take it home
that is more time spent unchilled



* the heavy ceramic container serves as a thermal mass and will keep foods cold longer
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Old 06-04-2007, 07:00 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VeraBlue
The information you've been given is correct. Rice, potatoes and pasta are extremely hazardous once cooked, and should always be kept well within the food temperature safety zones. Indeed, it's not the mayonnaise.
to delay the spoilage food scientists suggest changing the PH
using some sort of acid is the recommended way
while mayo has some acid it is not enough
i always use a vinaigrette but a strong vinaigrette
esp sinc the starches will absorb the acid not the oil
that is why you will find alot of these kind of salads taste bland after a few hours when earlier it seem perfectly seasoned
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Old 06-22-2007, 01:28 PM   #13
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I wonder how much of the anxiety about mayo is the fact that home made mayo (like aioli) is made with raw eggs? Certainly there is a huge difference between Kraft mayo and the homemade verson in terms of pathogen growth (bacteria). Remember, one of the ways a microbiology lab grows viruses and many bacteria is on eggs!
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Old 06-22-2007, 01:32 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mnsills
I wonder how much of the anxiety about mayo is the fact that home made mayo (like aioli) is made with raw eggs? Certainly there is a huge difference between Kraft mayo and the homemade verson in terms of pathogen growth (bacteria). Remember, one of the ways a microbiology lab grows viruses and many bacteria is on eggs!

However, the high acidity retards bacterial growth.
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Old 06-22-2007, 02:45 PM   #15
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I remember reading about this man who became very, very ill because he ate a baked potoato that had been wrapped in foil and let set out on the counter for a couple of hours. Did anyone else read this article?
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Old 06-22-2007, 02:53 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoAnn L.
I remember reading about this man who became very, very ill because he ate a baked potoato that had been wrapped in foil and let set out on the counter for a couple of hours. Did anyone else read this article?
You say very, very ill. There have been a few cases of botulism from foil wrapped baked potatoes.

"Clostridium botulinum spores on the skin of a potato can survive in a foilwrapped baked potato. If the potato is eaten immediately, the spores canít germinate. If the still-wrapped potato cools at room temperature, the spores can germinate in the anaerobic environment of the foil, and the bacteria will produce their deadly toxin. Donít eat the room-cooled potato, or make sure it is unwrapped before cooling."

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Old 06-26-2007, 09:23 PM   #17
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Uncle Bob has been right (or at least I agree) in every response I've seen him post to, while viewing the forums tonight. Now I am considering doing the lookup for his past posts.. ;-)

In any case, out of the sun, under cover, and cold enough (lots of ice), seem to do the trick for all the picnics I've been to. If the food looks dry, uncovered, or is not cool to the touch, it does not enter my mouth, or anyone I care about.

We have bacteria all over us, inside us, and all around us. Some are benefitial, some are not.

It's only the bad ones that do bad things to us, and with a little care and common sense, we can usually avoid those if we have a part in the food prep.

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Old 06-27-2007, 12:57 PM   #18
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The Mayo info is interesting. When I travel or picnic away from home ;salads are prepared differently than when at home.

I make my own dressing. EVOO and different vinegars, and different spices and use this for my "traveling salads". These salads travel best (always try to keep them cold) and they improve taste while traveling.
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