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Old 11-10-2013, 10:12 AM   #31
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Start with the potato. Vitamin B complex for starters.
It's not high in B complex vitamins, but is in B6. And B6 isn't a nutrient unique to potatoes, it's available in other foods. Here's a short list:

World's Healthiest Foods rich in vitamin B6
Food - %Daily Value
Tuna 59%
Chicken 34%
Turkey 32%
Potatoes 27%
Cod 26%
Sunflower Seeds 23.5%
Halibut 22.5%
Spinach 22%
Banana 21.5%
Avocado 19%
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Old 11-10-2013, 10:21 AM   #32
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I'm curious about what nutrient(s) is/are found only in carb-rich foods. Without doing any research I'm still pretty confident that the most nutrient dense foods would rank fairly low in the carb arena.
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Start with the potato. Vitamin B complex for starters.
B complex is available from plenty of low carb sources. B12 is only naturally bio-available to humans from animal sources such as meat, fish, milk, and eggs.
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Old 11-10-2013, 11:17 AM   #33
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Lots of fruits and vegetables are high in carbs.

IMO, avoiding highly refined carbs is sensible - breads, pasta and rice. But some of these diets advocate avoiding fruits and vegetables as well and replacing the lost nutrients with supplements. This makes no sense to me.
There are always some people who will go overboard. I agree that any diet that needs nutritional supplements is questionable. That includes what many people eat when they aren't "dieting", but they need a multivitamin. I'm not talking about the cases where someone doesn't absorb some nutrients well or is taking medication that interferes with the absorption of some nutrients.

I followed the Atkins diet close to 10 years ago. For the first two weeks, known as induction, there was no fruit and the only allowed vegis are low carb. After that other foods are slowly introduced and daily carb limits are increased. I lost ~50 lbs in a year and a half. My cholesterol levels were good before I started that diet. They were even better after a year of low carb. I won't claim this is the case for everyone.

A friend of mine lost weight and feels better with the paleo diet, which is fairly low carb, but that's not the aim.

I think those are the two best known low carb diets and if done properly, there are plenty of nutrients and no need for supplements.
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Old 11-11-2013, 08:03 PM   #34
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I have no idea, but they do that a lot on this side of the pond. I really dislike it.
It looks to us as if north americans have a much sweeter tooth than us Brits. My father was a driver/mechanic during the 1939/45 unpleasantness and spoke about having to visit American army bases to deliver and collect equipment, in the course of which he was often fed in the mess hall. He once told me about maple syrup being poured over steaks, to name but one (in his sights) oddity.

I've noticed on Food Network that a lot of diner type places seem to have (to us) rather odd sweet/savoury combinations. The nearest we seem to get is apple sauce with pork , cranberry jelly with turkey and redcurrant jelly with venison or lamb but even that isn't very sweet and honey glazed hams.
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Old 11-11-2013, 09:44 PM   #35
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It looks to us as if north americans have a much sweeter tooth than us Brits. My father was a driver/mechanic during the 1939/45 unpleasantness and spoke about having to visit American army bases to deliver and collect equipment, in the course of which he was often fed in the mess hall. He once told me about maple syrup being poured over steaks, to name but one (in his sights) oddity.

I've noticed on Food Network that a lot of diner type places seem to have (to us) rather odd sweet/savoury combinations. The nearest we seem to get is apple sauce with pork , cranberry jelly with turkey and redcurrant jelly with venison or lamb but even that isn't very sweet and honey glazed hams.
That's probably part of why I don't much like sweet with savoury. My parents were European and we ate mostly Danish and Swedish food at home. Yup, applesauce with pork chops and the other stuff, but not honey glazed ham. I've seen Danish recipes for that, but my mum never made it. I was really shocked and dismayed the first time I was served ham with a sweet glaze. Even as a kid my reaction was .
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Old 11-11-2013, 10:08 PM   #36
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It looks to us as if north americans have a much sweeter tooth than us Brits....maple syrup being poured over steaks, to name but one (in his sights) oddity.

I've noticed on Food Network that a lot of diner type places seem to have (to us) rather odd sweet/savoury combinations. The nearest we seem to get is apple sauce with pork , cranberry jelly with turkey and redcurrant jelly with venison or lamb but even that isn't very sweet and honey glazed hams.
Cranberry sauce, applesauce, current jelly are served along side the proteins you mentioned. These are fairly common savory/sweet combinations. Nowhere have I ever seen or heard of maple syrup poured over steak!

I am one who doesn't like sweet and savory together. I prefer most of my meats served 'naked' so I can enjoy the flavor of the meat. The pan seared duck breast I had Sunday night was topped with a little pan sauce which did not include any fruity components though sweet seems to be 'must have' accompaniment to duck.
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Old 11-11-2013, 10:11 PM   #37
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I've never seen maple syrup on steak, but I have seen it at a sugaring off, on eggs and sausages. Not my cup of tea.
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Old 11-11-2013, 11:29 PM   #38
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No "sweet with my meat" type person, too. Can't stand it when Shrek pours maple syrup all over the eggs, sausage(bacon) and potatoes I just cooked for him.

However, I do put sugar in my coleslaw.
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Old 11-12-2013, 06:32 AM   #39
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No "sweet with my meat" type person, too. Can't stand it when Shrek pours maple syrup all over the eggs, sausage(bacon) and potatoes I just cooked for him.

However, I do put sugar in my coleslaw.
My stomach turns when I see someone do that. I used to love real maple syrup. My son Poo brought me a half gallon one time when he was working his weekend in Vermont. His former landlord has a piece of land loaded with sugar maples. I took a sip of the syrup, and that cured me of "too, too, sweet for me". I didn't even keep the jug. I gave it to Spike. I like just butter and a small sprinkling of sugar on my pancakes or French Toast. Most of the times I even skip the sugar. Just butter will do.
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Old 11-12-2013, 08:50 AM   #40
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I've never seen maple syrup on steak, but I have seen it at a sugaring off, on eggs and sausages. Not my cup of tea.
"Sugaring off"? What does that mean?

I've never seen or heard of putting maple syrup on steak, either. I do like it with sausage, but not eggs or potatoes. Has no one here tried chocolate-covered bacon? Or sweet and sour pork?

I think some of the popularity of sweet/savory dishes comes from the melting pot of cultures in the United States. It's more common in the Middle East and Asia to include fruits in savory dishes than in Europe and we have a lot of immigrants from those areas.
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Low Carb Cole Slaw Here you go Alix. I found this really tasty. No real indication that it's a low anything recipe. LOW-CARB COLE SLAW C Mayonnaise C Sour Cream 1 tsp Apple Cider Vinegar 2 tsp Prepared Mustard tsp Salt 1 pkt Equal tsp Celery Seeds 1 Lb Cole Slaw Mix, bagged Combine the dressing ingredients in a large bowl. Add the cole slaw mix. Toss to combine and refrigerate for a couple of hours to overnight to allow flavors to blend. Serve cold. 3 stars 1 reviews
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