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Old 09-14-2018, 11:34 PM   #1
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Making bean sprouts last longer in the fridge?

A 12 oz. bag costs only $1.79, but they go bad within days as I use them for sandwiches only, but not everyday.

The current method I use is placing paper towels in the bottom of a shallow plastic container with lid, then setting a shallow layer of sprouts, then covering with more paper towels. That works so-so.

Other methods I've not tried (read about). Soak the sprouts in hot tap water bath very briefly with a tablespoon of vinegar. Then put them in a very cold water bath, then use a salad spinner, then do the paper towel method. "The vinegar is supposed to kill mold/mildew already attacking the sprouts. The cold water bath/rinse shocks the cell walls and they contract leaving some water within." (tip from an oriental truck farmer).

Another idea might be to use either method above, and store them in the fridge with one of those "BluApple" packets that absorb gasses.

Lastly, I could just blanch them in hot water, ice cold bath, dry and quick freeze and thaw as needed.


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Old 09-15-2018, 01:41 AM   #2
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I'll let you know. I've grown alfalfa sprouts in a mason jar. They last a good while. Bean sprouts start getting soggy the moment you open the bag. I bet you a shot of nitrogen in the bag keeps them "fresh" awhile longer.

A reference to my earlier posts about nitrogen inserted into vegetable produce bags to keep them on the shelf longer.
Those BluApple gas absorbing packets? I've added a packet and it does extend the life of my bagged up celery sticks.
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Old 09-15-2018, 07:36 AM   #3
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The rinse with vinegar and water works.
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Old 09-15-2018, 08:00 AM   #4
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Noted. I may go the route of blanching them and then quick freezing them. The only thing with that excellent idea is...wanting the frozen spouts now, not a day later slowly thawed. I'll try gently thawing frozen sprouts in the microwave for a today sandwich.

An avocado mashed up, cheddar cheese and bean sprouts on bread is a simple fave of mine. The sprouts make the sandwich.
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Old 09-15-2018, 08:33 AM   #5
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I wouldn't think the freezing would work at all. Would they not just be soggy upon defrosting? I could see adding them frozen to cook or to a sandwich about to be eaten immediately. But thawing??...
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Old 09-15-2018, 09:52 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
I wouldn't think the freezing would work at all. Would they not just be soggy upon defrosting? I could see adding them frozen to cook or to a sandwich about to be eaten immediately. But thawing??...
I was thinking that too (freezing and then thawing). I should just buy $ 1.79 worth of sprouts and bite the bullet and toss the bunch after a few days. Seems a shame to have to toss them.
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Old 09-15-2018, 11:24 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
I wouldn't think the freezing would work at all. Would they not just be soggy upon defrosting?...

I wouldn't freeze them. With or without blanching.
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Old 09-15-2018, 11:50 AM   #8
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I wouldn't freeze them. With or without blanching.
Agreed. Freezing damages the cell membranes - they will be soggy and limp when they thaw. I would suggest using something else that's crunchy but lasts longer, like cucumbers.
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Old 09-15-2018, 12:13 PM   #9
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Make your own, it took 10 days.
Mung beans germinated. They needed at least 24 hours of soaking.

They started out in a quart jar, cheesecloth covering the top, for 1/2 cup of mung beans.
They stayed that way for a couple days.
Then they were moved into a colander in a bowl, resting in a tea towel, the tea towel under them and over them, wet.
Rinsed 3 times per day.
They started to lose their hulls near the end.

1/2 cup mung bean seeds turned into about 6 cups of sprouts, very crunchy, just starting to send out the first leaf. They go in the refrigerator now until I make the egg foo young. I'd do this again!









These lasted in the refrigerator for at least 10 days.
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Old 10-03-2018, 03:11 PM   #10
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Bean sprouts are cheap.... usually less than a buck a bag at local Asian markets. I use them in salads when fresh, otherwise I just fry them by themselves or in stir fries just to get rid of them.
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