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Old 08-10-2007, 11:34 AM   #11
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jennyema, what are your proportions? We don't use the paste but rather a tin of anchovies that we smash ... it equals about 2 tbl. We actually use a little more oil than was stated here as well ... enough to make it a dressing. Also, I agree about the yolks - a must in the dressing (IMHO).

Isn't it funny how a standard dressing like this can have so many variations?
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Old 08-10-2007, 11:46 AM   #12
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I never measure really but in general I use a 3/1 ratio of oil to acid and then add a bit more acid so it's more like 2.5/1.5. I usually add 1 smashed anchovy which is probably 1/2 of a teaspoon. Then I'll eat a few while finishing the dressing. A teaspoon of dijon mustard. A clove of garlic made into a paste. A hit of soy sauce. A hit of hot sauce. Some Penzey's Florida seasoned pepper, esp. if the acid is lemopn juice. If I want it really lemony, I'll use a very, very small amount of Boyjian lemon oil.

I will frequently leave out the hot sauce, depending on my mood.

I'll often add shallots or fresh herbs. Use lime juice and add cilantro. Add other Penzey's stuff, etc.
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Old 08-10-2007, 11:55 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by llvllagical_llkook
I've been making this dressing for lettuce for quite some time. My parents called it caesar dressing, although I'm pretty sure it's not. I've asked other cooks and none know of it. It tastes very good. Some of the quantities are estimated, so use whatever quantities you wish.

In a bowl, mix:

2-2.5 tbsp anchovy paste from a tube
1-1.5 tbsp extra virgin olive oil or sunflower oil infused with sundried tomatoes
3 capfuls of lemon juice
3 tbsp dijon or regular mustard
2 tbsp garlic (if you like garlic)
2 tbsp lousiana bottled hot sauce
4 tbsp + worcestershire sauce

Using a large spoon, mix the dressing up. Tilt the bowl and using the back of the spoon, smear the dressing along the edges of the bowl, not to the top, around middleish to bottom. Let it settle for 5 minutes then toss in your lettuce. If desired, add in some bacon bits and grated parmesian cheese. My parents hate egg in their dressing, which is why it's not in there.

The mustard and anchovy paste helps "hold" the dressing and the oil gives some taste (if infused) and makes it easier to flow. The rest gives a nice combination of flavours. The anchovy paste's taste is noticable, although most people have no clue what it is. If it's spicy mustard, the hot sauce, garlic and lemon juice are a nice combination.
Your recipe isn't what I'm familiar with as an actual Caesar dressing. The one is make is close to the one Caesar Cardini prepared in his restaurant in Mexico. Here's a bit of history about this yummy recipe along with what is supposed to be Caesar's recipe.

Love Caesar salad. It's one of my all-time favorites.
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Old 08-10-2007, 11:59 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by JMediger
bucky, our recipe comes from a restaurant my in-laws love where they make the dressing at your table ... from what I've heard, quite impressive!
are you sure? i don't think i've ever eaten with your in-laws...

i love having stuff prepared or at least sliced/served tableside. salads and desserts, of course, but also some entrees like roasts of wild game or prime rib, and asian specialties like whole fish that is bathed in hot broth or oil and served.

agreed, btw, about the egg.

pytnplace, what is coddling an egg? is it safer than using raw eggs?
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Old 08-10-2007, 12:07 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
agreed, btw, about the egg.

pytnplace, what is coddling an egg? is it safer than using raw eggs?
I’m wondering if people are truly coddling their eggs (using an egg coddler) or if their just soft boiling the eggs in their shells?
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Old 08-10-2007, 12:55 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keltin
Im wondering if people are truly coddling their eggs (using an egg coddler) or if their just soft boiling the eggs in their shells?
Or just poach the yolk in simmering water. That's what i do. I don't use the white in my dressing.
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Old 08-10-2007, 04:47 PM   #17
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I don't use an egg coddler (?). What I do is simmer the egg for about 1 minute in the shell. The egg is soft enough to separate the yolk from the white. I saw Emeril do it once. It's supposed to be safer. Not sure about that though. I know that I feel a bit better about things when I coddle the egg.
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Old 08-10-2007, 09:19 PM   #18
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If you are are food safety-conscious, like me, you need to use pasteurized eggs. Otherwise there is a big salmonella risk.

If you can't find them (I can't) coddle -- parcook them -- or even wholly cook them before using in the dressing.
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Old 08-11-2007, 11:57 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
If you are are food safety-conscious, like me, you need to use pasteurized eggs. Otherwise there is a big salmonella risk.
Big salmonella risk? This is from the American Egg Board:

"The risk of getting a foodborne illness from eggs is very low. However, the nutrients that make eggs a high-quality food for humans are also a good growth medium for bacteria. In addition to food, bacteria also need moisture, a favorable temperature and time in order to multiply and increase the risk of illness. In the rare event that an egg contains bacteria, you can reduce the risk by proper chilling and eliminate it by proper cooking. When you handle eggs with care, they pose no greater food-safety risk than any other perishable food. The inside of an egg was once considered almost sterile. But, over recent years, the bacterium Salmonella enteritidis (Se) has been found inside a small number of eggs. Scientists estimate that, on average across the U.S., only 1 of every 20,000 eggs might contain the bacteria. So, the likelihood that an egg might contain Se is extremely small 0.005% (five one-thousandths of one percent). At this rate, if youre an average consumer, you might encounter a contaminated egg once every 84 years."
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Old 08-11-2007, 01:01 PM   #20
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Yeah, "big" was probably not the right word. But there is a risk, certainly.
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