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Old 12-21-2013, 01:02 PM   #1
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Boxing Day menus

Hi everyone,

My husband is British so Boxing Day has always been a big part of his holiday celebration. When I ask him about his mum's Boxing Day menu, though, he just shrugs and says "leftovers." Well, I like to plan a little more elaborately than that so I was wondering if anyone out there has any favorite Boxing Day recipes they'd like to share? I know some people do a ham but we do that on Christmas Eve ... So what I'm looking for is some recipes that incorporate ham/turkey leftovers but aren't just basic casseroles or bubble n' squeak.

Thanks in advance!

Becki

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Old 12-21-2013, 02:17 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GiddyUpGo View Post
Hi everyone,

My husband is British so Boxing Day has always been a big part of his holiday celebration. When I ask him about his mum's Boxing Day menu, though, he just shrugs and says "leftovers." Well, I like to plan a little more elaborately than that so I was wondering if anyone out there has any favorite Boxing Day recipes they'd like to share? I know some people do a ham but we do that on Christmas Eve ... So what I'm looking for is some recipes that incorporate ham/turkey leftovers but aren't just basic casseroles or bubble n' squeak.

Thanks in advance!

Becki
I do a filo pastry pie

Basically roughly 500g turkey, 150g ham = or whatever meats you've got
3tbsp oil, 300g leeks, 30g flour, 400ml milk, herbs, 1tbsp mustard, 80g cranberries, zest of orange.

Cook leeks till softened, add flour, stir in the milk. Bring to simmer, add meat, herbs & mustard, 4 2mins, place into a baking dish.

Melt butter to brush the filo, scrunch and place on top, scatter the cranberries & zest.

Bake in a 180c / 160f fan for 25mins

Sometimes I add the cranberries and zest to the main mixture, and use a all butter puff pastry. Also the measurements don't need to be exact
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Old 12-21-2013, 05:22 PM   #3
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My birthday is on Boxing Day. We will be on a flight home. So I am thinking dinner will probably be a bag of nuts or pretzels.
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Old 12-21-2013, 05:31 PM   #4
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British Boxing Day fare? Cold turkey (of course) and likely also cold or hot cooked ham. Scotch eggs, pork pie, cocktail sausages and maybe sausage rolls, potato salad, green salad, potato crisps (chips to you North Americans), pickles (lots of 'em including pickled beets) and probably some cheeses (cheddar, lancashire, stilton and cheshire perhaps) and biscuits. Maybe a terrine or a pate and melba toast. Likely followed by a big English trifle made with lots of sherry. And naturally, left-over Christmas cake and mince pies.

Oh yum!!
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Old 12-21-2013, 05:54 PM   #5
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I will most likely be fasting most of Boxing Day as it looks like I will be going in for gallbladder surgery the next day.

Normally TB and I just put together a bunch of appetizers, get a bunch of movies and curl up on the couch and veg on boxing day. This tradition started because for several years we did tech (sound and computer) for our church and would be so busy preparing for the two Christmas Eve services on top of running our own business and holiday prep. I would then share cooking duties with my sister on Christmas day. So once it was all over, we took the 26th for ourselves. We haven't done tech for several years but still keep up the tradition.

Growing up, my family usually had roast with all the trimmings including Yorkshire pudding, as well as some Christmas day leftovers. It was usually all set out and you helped yourself. We had an open house so people would be coming and going all day.
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Old 12-22-2013, 12:00 PM   #6
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curry.we brits love our boxing day ruby!!as it's boxing day,keep it simple & stress free.buy the best quality jar(s) of curry "cook in" sauce for the left over turkey,that you can find.you can also chuck in any left over sprouts,carrots,spuds etc,to warm thru'.uncle ben's microwave pilau rice & some ready made poppadums & chutney.done!
me?as with steve k,i'm hoping to be on a plane.somewhere hot & sunny,for a week or three,so it depends what's on the menu at 35,000 feet or however high these things fly!!
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:42 AM   #7
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We don't really do specific recipes as such for Boxing Day, it really is leftovers . Turkey is fab made into a curry as Harry says , or I make turkey and ham soup and put a stash in the freezer too . We mainly have cold cuts of meat, pickles, piccalilli, cheeses , that sort of thing, buffet style . I do have a favourite for using Stilton which is Delias Stilton rarebit , Stilton mixed with walnuts, onions, mustard powder, an egg, mixed together and then toasted on bread under the grill .
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Old 12-23-2013, 09:16 AM   #8
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Coronation Turkey

Quote:
Originally Posted by GiddyUpGo View Post
Hi everyone,

My husband is British so Boxing Day has always been a big part of his holiday celebration. When I ask him about his mum's Boxing Day menu, though, he just shrugs and says "leftovers." Well, I like to plan a little more elaborately than that so I was wondering if anyone out there has any favorite Boxing Day recipes they'd like to share? I know some people do a ham but we do that on Christmas Eve ... So what I'm looking for is some recipes that incorporate ham/turkey leftovers but aren't just basic casseroles or bubble n' squeak.

Thanks in advance!

Becki
Boxing Day leftovers are the best bit of Christmas!

As well as the cold cuts and pickles, etc., and the curries and the pies and the casseroles what about "Coronation Turkey". Cold turkey in a fruity curried mayonnaise, based on the recipe for "Coronation Chicken" which was devised in 1953 by Constance Spry and Rosemary Hume of the Cordon Bleu Cookery School in London, for one of the dinners held to celebrate the coronation of "Our Own Dear Queen". This is the recipe I use

CORONATION CHICKEN | Recipes | Nigella Lawson - Pinched of course, from a "part work" magazine cookery course called, IIRC, "Good Cooking" except I don't usually use the tomato puree/paste/concentrate and I don't follow her recommendation to serve it with cold pasta - yuck.

This recipe replaces the more usual raisins with apricot jam (I use "Bonne Maman" if I haven't any homemade on hand) and I think it's an improvement. It isn't too sweet because there's lemon juice in there.

Not just for Christmas it's good for a buffet anytime. I sometimes cook a chicken specially for it if I/m doing a large party.

(And don't confuse it with a disgusting mixture erroneously called "coronation chicken" which is sold in a plastic tub in the chiller cabinet of supermarkets for use as a sandwich filler. The real McCoy is an eye-opener which bears no comparison with that travesty!)
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Old 12-23-2013, 09:17 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Cobean View Post
curry.we brits love our boxing day ruby!!as it's boxing day,keep it simple & stress free.buy the best quality jar(s) of curry "cook in" sauce for the left over turkey,that you can find.you can also chuck in any left over sprouts,carrots,spuds etc,to warm thru'.uncle ben's microwave pilau rice & some ready made poppadums & chutney.done!
me?as with steve k,i'm hoping to be on a plane.somewhere hot & sunny,for a week or three,so it depends what's on the menu at 35,000 feet or however high these things fly!!
Just a comment. Tilda microwave rice is streets ahead of Uncle Bens.
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Old 12-23-2013, 09:36 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Jing View Post
British Boxing Day fare? Cold turkey (of course) and likely also cold or hot cooked ham. Scotch eggs, pork pie, cocktail sausages and maybe sausage rolls, potato salad, green salad, potato crisps (chips to you North Americans), pickles (lots of 'em including pickled beets) and probably some cheeses (cheddar, lancashire, stilton and cheshire perhaps) and biscuits. Maybe a terrine or a pate and melba toast. Likely followed by a big English trifle made with lots of sherry. And naturally, left-over Christmas cake and mince pies.

Oh yum!!
Oh yes, trifle is essential for Boxing Day - with jelly of course and decorated with hundreds-and-thousands and silver balls, slivered almonds and glace cherries on the top. Oh, and rum in the custard as well as sherry soaked into the sponge cake - you don't drive your car after my family's trifle!

None of these weird "tipsy cake" apologies for a good old Edwardian trifle that feature everywhere these days, thank you very much. They may come from ancient "Receipt" books but were basically a way of using up stale cake. A proper Edwardian trifle is a triumph and takes pride of place in the centre of the table.
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