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Old 10-21-2013, 01:36 AM   #31
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Wow! That Christmas cake should come with a public health and fire warning!

I don't want you to think I'm being pushy but you can have my C/pudding recipe if you'd like it.

It's not particularly hard work. You weigh the ingredients, mix them all up (I use my very clean hands) leave it to stand overnight with a cloth over the bowl. Then next day. give it a good stir (and make a wish*), adding a little more liquid if it needs it, pack it into bowls, cover them and steam for 6 hours more or less depending on size. You don't have to stand over them. As long as you are at home to make sure the pan doesn't dry out you can cook, clean, read, knit, do the laundry, watch television, prune the roses or anything you like.

* and it really will come true.
I would love for you to share your Christmas pudding recipe, how kind of you. :). I would never think you were pushy!
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Old 10-21-2013, 07:07 AM   #32
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When I was young I would make it for my grandmother. She had fond memories of her grandmother (from England) making it. I didn't use suet though as that isn't a common ingredient here. I used her grandmother's mold with the locking top for steaming. I'd serve it with hard sauce, often called brandy butter (butter beaten with sugar and booze).

It's definitely not common here.
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Old 10-21-2013, 07:46 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
When I was young I would make it for my grandmother. She had fond memories of her grandmother (from England) making it. I didn't use suet though as that isn't a common ingredient here. I used her grandmother's mold with the locking top for steaming. I'd serve it with hard sauce, often called brandy butter (butter beaten with sugar and booze).

It's definitely not common here.
Now that is tradition with love.

When I make a rib roast, I just ask my butcher for a strip of beef suet to wrap the roast in. He always gives me a long free strip.
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Old 10-21-2013, 11:06 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
When I was young I would make it for my grandmother. She had fond memories of her grandmother (from England) making it. I didn't use suet though as that isn't a common ingredient here. I used her grandmother's mold with the locking top for steaming. I'd serve it with hard sauce, often called brandy butter (butter beaten with sugar and booze).

It's definitely not common here.
What did you use instead of suet?
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Old 10-21-2013, 11:24 AM   #35
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You don't have. Christmas pudding in the US ?
The corresponding tradition in this country is fruit cake. Usually it's made with dried fruit, nuts, and a good dose of brandy. Some of the homemade versions are very good and not entirely different from your traditional Christmas pudding. Unfortunately, most people these days buy store-bought fruit cakes, which are just awful and can be used for doorstops long after the holiday has passed.

By the way, a few years ago I brought a Tesco Christmas pud back with me from a trip to London. We let it mature in the cupboard and on Christmas day did the whole flaming table presentation. Quite fun!
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Old 10-21-2013, 11:27 AM   #36
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When I was young I would make it for my grandmother. She had fond memories of her grandmother (from England) making it. I didn't use suet though as that isn't a common ingredient here. I used her grandmother's mold with the locking top for steaming. I'd serve it with hard sauce, often called brandy butter (butter beaten with sugar and booze).

It's definitely not common here.

I don't think you can walk into the supermarket here and buy suet. When my mother needed it, I worked for a company that owned a chain of supermarkets. I knew most of the store owners, so I went in and asked him for the suet.
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Old 10-21-2013, 11:51 AM   #37
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The corresponding tradition in this country is fruit cake. Usually it's made with dried fruit, nuts, and a good dose of brandy. Some of the homemade versions are very good and not entirely different from your traditional Christmas pudding. Unfortunately, most people these days buy store-bought fruit cakes, which are just awful and can be used for doorstops long after the holiday has passed.

By the way, a few years ago I brought a Tesco Christmas pud back with me from a trip to London. We let it mature in the cupboard and on Christmas day did the whole flaming table presentation. Quite fun!

Those store bought fruitcakes are usually a gag gift. Aren't they? Who would really eat them? You give them to someone you don't like, such as your boss. LOL My first job was at the candy counter of an upscale department store. Around the holidays, they sold a delicious fruitcake from a company named Barton's. I don't know if that company is still in business.
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Old 10-21-2013, 11:56 AM   #38
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I don't think you can walk into the supermarket here and buy suet. When my mother needed it, I worked for a company that owned a chain of supermarkets. I knew most of the store owners, so I went in and asked him for the suet.
You can find it at the garden store, in the bird food section, but you might have to melt it to get the seeds out.



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Old 10-21-2013, 11:58 AM   #39
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I don't think you can walk into the supermarket here and buy suet. When my mother needed it, I worked for a company that owned a chain of supermarkets. I knew most of the store owners, so I went in and asked him for the suet.
You should be able to get suet from a butcher shop.


Quote:
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Those store bought fruitcakes are usually a gag gift. Aren't they? Who would really eat them? You give them to someone you don't like, such as your boss. LOL My first job was at the candy counter of an upscale department store. Around the holidays, they sold a delicious fruitcake from a company named Barton's. I don't know if that company is still in business.

I understand people consider fruitcake a joke. That's probably because there are some crappy fruitcakes out there. I happen to like fruitcake and have had some good store bought versions. I haven't yet made a fruitcake. I don't even have a recipe.
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Old 10-21-2013, 01:20 PM   #40
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What is this "butcher shop" of which you speak?

When I worked for a previous company, we sold a fruit cake that was made with tons of nuts and dried fruit instead of candied and it was so delicious,I should really try to recreate it. There is also a place here in nc that makes one that is quite good and it does have some candied fruit, I think that it's called Southern Supreme.
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