"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Menu Planning > Special Events Planning & Holiday Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-22-2013, 09:25 PM   #61
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
You should be able to get suet from a butcher shop.
Trouble is, it's a pig to deal with when you buy it from the butcher. You have to peel away any membrane and put it through the mincer or shred it with a knife. But needs must when the devil calls, I suppose.
__________________

__________________
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2013, 09:29 PM   #62
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Sitting and sharing it with the Queen.
It would be a great honour for her to be invited to take take tea with the distinguished members of DC. We'd better tell her not to bring those damned corgis. We don't know if they're house trained.
__________________

__________________
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2013, 09:35 PM   #63
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
I am also a big fan of fruitcake, with a slice of sharp cheddar cheese and a cup of tea.

It costs so much to make one these days that I think it is a better value to buy one.

The folks at Collins Street Bakery in Texas do a great job.

If you order once you will get junk mail for the rest of your life, but it's worth it, lol!

https://www.collinstreet.com/pages/o...uxe_fruitcakes
How very English - fruit cake, cheese and a cup of tea. And very northern, I think - Yorkshire and Lancashire I think.

Although a friend who lives in Birmingham (ours, not yours) likes very rich marzipan-ed and iced Christmas cake spread very thickly with full fat Philadelphia cream cheese. Even I draw the line at that!
__________________
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2013, 09:45 PM   #64
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,086
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
It would be a great honour for her to be invited to take take tea with the distinguished members of DC. We'd better tell her not to bring those damned corgis. We don't know if they're house trained.
I have this image of a big pile of poop in the middle of those huge red carpeted stairs at Buckingham.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2013, 06:07 AM   #65
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
How very English - fruit cake, cheese and a cup of tea. And very northern, I think - Yorkshire and Lancashire I think.

Although a friend who lives in Birmingham (ours, not yours) likes very rich marzipan-ed and iced Christmas cake spread very thickly with full fat Philadelphia cream cheese. Even I draw the line at that!
No marzipan or cream cheese on my fruitcake, thank you.

In our home we have always served sharp cheese with pie and other very sweet desserts, I'm not sure if it was a tradition handed down from colonial New England or from my English city Grandmother.

The last of the dried out old fruitcake was always served with a warm cornstarch based nutmeg sauce poured over it. That tradition I'm sure came from my Grandmother's side of the family.

I have always been curious about English baking. Most recipes use much less sugar than our standard recipes, a wise idea. Do you think that is a carryover from rationing or is it a more deeply rooted tradition.
__________________
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2013, 06:44 AM   #66
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,086
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
How very English - fruit cake, cheese and a cup of tea. And very northern, I think - Yorkshire and Lancashire I think.

Although a friend who lives in Birmingham (ours, not yours) likes very rich marzipan-ed and iced Christmas cake spread very thickly with full fat Philadelphia cream cheese. Even I draw the line at that!
We have so many cities and towns that were named after the places in England where the settlers put down their roots. Starting with Plymouth, where the pilgrims landed.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2013, 07:26 PM   #67
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,170
Here you are SomeBunny

Christmas Pudding
Ingredients
4oz self-raising flour + a pinch of salt
1 level teaspoon mixed spice Ĺ level teasp ground cinnamon ľ teasp freshly ground nutmeg
8 oz shredded beef suet 8oz fresh white breadcrumbs
Grated rind and juice of a lemon & an orange 12 oz soft brown sugar (I use the dark sort)
2 oz blanched chopped almonds
8 oz each seedless raisins, zante currants and sultanas (= golden raisins) + 4oz each chopped candied peel and prunes (soaked if necessary) pitted and chopped
2 tablespoons of treacle (Optional. We donít like it so I never put it in)
2-3 tablespoons of rum or brandy (more if you like!)
1/2 an English pint (10F oz) Stout such as Guinness (I use Mackeson which is a touch less bitter than Guinness)
A large carrot, grated (more traditional than essential but it seems to add something)

2 pudding basins holding approx 2 pints + 2 large saucepans

Method
Sift the flour, spices and salt into a (very) large bowl. Add the rest of the ingredients except the liquids. Mix well, I use clean hands.
If using the treacle warm it slightly to make it thin and runny and add to the orange and lemon juices and the rum or brandy and stir well. Beat the eggs well and add to the treacle-rum mixture. Add this and the Guinness to the bowl. Mix very well with a large spoon, making sure you get down to the bottom and mix everything in. It should be moist but not wet and well mixed.
Cover with a cloth and leave over night
Next morning stir up the mix adding a little milk if rather dry. Call family to stir and make a wish. Grease pudding basins with butter and fill with the mix to within 1 inch at the top and smooth over.
Cover with double thickness of greaseproof paper or baking parchment, folding a pleat in the paper to allow for the pudding to rise, and try securely with string.
Place each pudding on an up-turned saucer in a large saucepan with boiling water to come a third of the way up the outside of the bowl. Cover the pan and steam gently for 5-6 hours. Top up the boiling water from time to time.
When the puddings are cooked and cooled remove the damp paper and replace it with fresh ungreased paper. Tie securely and store in a cool but airy place until required, Do not cover airtight or mould may develop.
This makes a pudding for this year and one for next year or to give to a friend. They serve 5-6 people.
On Christmas morning cover with fresh buttered paper and steam briskly for 2 hours. As well as heating them this will make them darker. Serve with whatever sauce you prefer. Either dish up in the kitchen or for traditional drama, heat a little brandy or rum and pour it, lighted , over the pudding and take it to table in flames. (Donít over-do the burning alcohol as you want to leave the Fire Brigade at home to enjoy their own Christmas dinner)
__________________
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2013, 07:56 PM   #68
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,009
Thank you for the recipe!

When I was reading it I had a flashback to one of our old friends on DC, Bolas De Fraile!

Bolas introduced us to Fanny Cradock!

__________________
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2013, 10:56 AM   #69
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,086
Mad Cook, your expression of "I use clean hands" reminds me of America's beloved Julia Child. She would always say in that high pitched voice of hers. "with impeccable clean hands". Everything had to be "impeccably clean." Even the towel she used.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2013, 11:00 AM   #70
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,086
When measuring out the treacle, if you grease or spray (Spam) the measuring device, (spoon, cup, etc.) it will flow right into the recipe and leave none behind. The same goes for any recipe that calls for honey or any item that is sticky.
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
pudding, christmas

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.