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Old 02-16-2007, 02:50 PM   #21
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I, too, do at least two kinds of fondue when I do it -- cheese and meat. And yes, you need know that you are going nowhere, and have lots of friends who love to talk and spend the entire evening. I've had good luck using the microwave oven to melt my cheese without burning it, but watch it closely or it'll turn into a rubber ball. You guys are making me hungry. Must be overdue for a fondue party.
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Old 10-17-2007, 09:59 AM   #22
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Holy thread revival Batman!

We are having a fondue soon, so that's why I was searching out fondue threads.

We get the Parisian potatoes and pre-cook them so they are not fully cooked, but still soft. Otherwise, it takes too long to cook them.

We generally have at least 4-8 forks per person so you can have a bunch of stuff on the go at once. We usually have oil, cheese and broth on the go, and then caramel and chocolate for dessert fondue. You have to choose your caramel wisely though because some of it hardens quickly.

Has anyone tried doing anything with pastry in the fondue? I was thinking about going to M&M and getting some stuff like the oriental party mixer pack just to add variety, but I'm not sure if it's such a good idea.
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Old 10-31-2007, 08:50 AM   #23
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We usually do a seafood fondue - prawns, firm white fish, ocean trout, bug tails, crayfish and sometimes scallops but they tend to spit. We also have a bowl of tempura batter by the side which tastes divine because it is so fresh. Also have a bowl of par cooked sweet potato, brocolli, cauliflower, snow peas, baby eggplant (if it looks any good) and sometimes potato. We use the metal fondue with oil and normally have store bought sauces or Asian sauces from the local Chinese restaurant. As a side line, also grab a packet of uncooked prawn crackers to throw in to the pot. Also have a bowl of steamed rice on hand. Have also done with beef and lamb in the past with obviously different condiments and no tempura.

For dessert fondues, the most popular ones I ever hosted were the Toblerone or Mars bars ones. We had lots of fresh fruit, marshmallows and slightly stale cake.

As to pastry in a fondue, I have put dumplings in made with wanton wrappers. They were fine. Don't know about any thicker pastry though.
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Old 12-17-2007, 12:37 PM   #24
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Advice on Pro's & Con's of Electric Fondue vs' Gel Burner

I'm throwing a fondue party, first time ever using a fondue...I'm doing chicken, and beef, and veggies....I am going to buy two fondue's, if money were no object which should I buy, the electric or the gel burner ones?

I'd like to know the pro's and con's of each...how slow is the gel burner fondue in actually cooking the meat? Also, how fast does it lose temperature with the gel burner? Does the electric fondue cook faster, or at the same rate? How long can I expect a skewer of beef to cook to medium? Is there anything I should know before buying the fondue, best type of pot, brands to stay away from, etc.

Any advice, input, is greatly appreciated here....

Mac
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Old 12-18-2007, 08:19 AM   #25
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When it comes to electric vs sterno, it really depends on the room you are serving it in. I live in a house built in 1854, and I prefer the sterno version. But a friend has electric, and the next time we do a fondue party, we will probably use both. The version I would NOT buy is the one that is lit by a candle. It is warm enough to keep something somewhat warm, but not hot enough to actually cook by.
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Old 12-18-2007, 08:36 AM   #26
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The one with the candle is meant really for a cheese or dessert fondue where you only want the mixture to be warm enough to continue moving. It isn't meant to cook anything with it.
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