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Old 10-15-2013, 04:24 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
Ahh, that would account for the white parts.
I thought it was some Danish method you used that gave it a different open kind of look. Now it makes sense!
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Old 10-15-2013, 04:29 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Roast turkey, mashed rutabaga-carrot-potatoes, French green beans, beets, Swedish cucumber salad, cranberry salsa, gravy, pumpkin pie, and elderberry-wild grape wine. I'm stuffed (and really glad the dishwasher is doing most of the clean up). Got the carcass roasting in the oven for stock. Made veggie stock while the turkey was roasting, so I'm all "stocked up" for soups.
CWS - Why do you re-roast the carcass? Does it add more flavor?
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Old 10-15-2013, 04:30 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by Rocket_J_Dawg View Post
CWS - Why do you re-roast the carcass? Does it add more flavor?
I was wondering the same thing.
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Old 10-15-2013, 04:33 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
One year I helped my M-I-L make the turkey. I let it cook on one side, then the other, and finally on its back. My B-I-L complained. The breast wasn't dry enough.

Everyone else liked that the bird was moister than usual.

I brine my turkey and it's always super juicy and delicious. I have had people ask if it was cooked enough because it as so juicy!
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Old 10-15-2013, 11:16 PM   #65
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I was wondering the same thing.
A friend who is a trained chef (Executive) does that and taught me to do that, so I always do that. Oh--I crack the bones and add about 1 - 2 tsp vinegar to the water in the roasting pan. The stock has a rich brown colour and definitely is turkey stock. I always found that the taste when cooking the carcass on the stove just didn't have enough turkey flavor and since I don't use bouillon cubes, etc., I was on a mission to get real turkey flavor (I wanted to get rid of the weak, watery taste of the "stock" made on the stove) without adding artificial enhancements. Once the bones have been in the oven overnight, I strain the liquid, put it in the fridge, and skim off any fat the next day (I toss the veggies and the bones). I then either freeze the stock or go to "day 2" where I put the stock on the stove, add veggies, and simmer. I vary when I add the veggies based on the type--root veggies go in before the celery, etc. I add the reserved turkey meat about 5 minutes before serving--just long enough to heat the meat through but not long enough for it to turn to mush.

I brown the aromatic veggies (onion, celery with leaves, carrots) before adding the stock. Yes, it takes longer, but there is truly the turkey flavour that comes through without adding any chicken broth, etc.
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Old 10-15-2013, 11:30 PM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
A friend who is a trained chef (Executive) does that and taught me to do that, so I always do that. Oh--I crack the bones and add about 1 - 2 tsp vinegar to the water in the roasting pan. The stock has a rich brown colour and definitely is turkey stock. I always found that the taste when cooking the carcass on the stove just didn't have enough turkey flavor and since I don't use bouillon cubes, etc., I was on a mission to get real turkey flavor (I wanted to get rid of the weak, watery taste of the "stock" made on the stove) without adding artificial enhancements. Once the bones have been in the oven overnight, I strain the liquid, put it in the fridge, and skim off any fat the next day (I toss the veggies and the bones). I then either freeze the stock or go to "day 2" where I put the stock on the stove, add veggies, and simmer. I vary when I add the veggies based on the type--root veggies go in before the celery, etc. I add the reserved turkey meat about 5 minutes before serving--just long enough to heat the meat through but not long enough for it to turn to mush.

I brown the aromatic veggies (onion, celery with leaves, carrots) before adding the stock. Yes, it takes longer, but there is truly the turkey flavour that comes through without adding any chicken broth, etc.
So, you aren't roasting the bones an extra time and then making stove top stock - you're putting the leftover, cooked bones, into a roasting pan with water and cooking the stock in the oven?
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Old 10-16-2013, 09:05 AM   #67
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So, you aren't roasting the bones an extra time and then making stove top stock - you're putting the leftover, cooked bones, into a roasting pan with water and cooking the stock in the oven?
I roast them for about an hour without liquid and then add water and let them cook at 250 overnight in the oven. I end up with a very "gelatinous" mass of stock to which I add water when making the soup on the stovetop.
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Old 10-16-2013, 10:35 AM   #68
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Happy Thanksgiving, Crazy Canuks!

Doing it twice this weekend. Saturday with the siblings and my mother. Traditional turkey and the fixin's. Then Monday, my kids are coming over and we are going to do up a leg of lamb, as we will have had our fill of foul by then...
Just as a matter of idle curiosity, where does the work "canuk" come from? I know it means "Canadian" just don't know why. Is it a particular branch of Canada?

First came across it in the Nelson Eddy song "Tramp, Tramp, Tramp" ("We're planters and canucks, Virginians and Kentucks...") when BBC television used to treat us to lovely old black and white musicals on Sunday afternoons
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Old 10-16-2013, 12:06 PM   #69
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Just as a matter of idle curiosity, where does the work "canuk" come from? I know it means "Canadian" just don't know why. Is it a particular branch of Canada?

First came across it in the Nelson Eddy song "Tramp, Tramp, Tramp" ("We're planters and canucks, Virginians and Kentucks...") when BBC television used to treat us to lovely old black and white musicals on Sunday afternoons
I spell it "Canuck". According to Wikipedia:

"The term appears to have been coined in the 19th century, although its etymology is unclear, it usually referred to those who worked in a forest, usually cultivating wood. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canuck
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Old 10-16-2013, 07:16 PM   #70
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I spell it "Canuck". According to Wikipedia:


"The term appears to have been coined in the 19th century, although its etymology is unclear, it usually referred to those who worked in a forest, usually cultivating wood. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canuck
Thanks for that, Taxlady
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