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Old 09-11-2007, 09:54 AM   #1
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Holiday planning

I know it is only September, but what parties and meals are you planning for the Thanksgiving, Christmas, Hannuka, etc? I'm already thinking in terms of Thanksgiving and my annual Tree trimming party (first Sunday in December). Then I give it a break and let my friends feed me! I usually make a traditional turkey dinner for Thanksgiving, and then make a big stew or thick soup of some kind for the Christmas party. What are you planning?

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Old 09-13-2007, 10:41 AM   #2
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Dh and I would love to just go to a restaurant on Thanksgiving, but our son feels strongly about staying home. When it is such a small group, it really only makes sense to cook one variety of each dish, and it usually comes down to Caesar salad, roast turkey, mashed potatoes, homemade cranberry sauce, waldorf salad, rolls from the bakery and pumpkin pie.

We don't have a traditional Christmas meal. We just decide each year what to have. We've had ham, prime rib, Chinese food and fried chicken in years past. On Christmas Eve, we usually make a meal of appetizers. Sometimes we have company for Christmas. Never for Thanksgiving, though. I host a cookie exchange every year in early December. The menu never changes- baked potato bar, I provide the potatoes and each guest brings a favorite topping, chili and cornbread and a big green salad. Easy but hearty and good. Also a perfect meal to be finished off with Christmas cookies!
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Old 09-13-2007, 01:15 PM   #3
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Made me think!

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Originally Posted by Claire View Post
I know it is only September, but what parties and meals are you planning for the Thanksgiving, Christmas, Hannuka, etc? I'm already thinking in terms of Thanksgiving and my annual Tree trimming party (first Sunday in December). Then I give it a break and let my friends feed me! I usually make a traditional turkey dinner for Thanksgiving, and then make a big stew or thick soup of some kind for the Christmas party. What are you planning?
Yes, The season is upon us - not too soon to look ahead. I'm only a novice hobby cook who likes to look to the cusines of others for inspiration. I'm thinking, a mixture?. Something from Greece, Italy, Ukraine, and some where else? Anyone have a suggestion? For real now. Thanks
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Old 09-21-2007, 12:37 PM   #4
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David, do you prefer baking or cooking meals? I'm very much the latter, but if you like sweets and/or breads, it is a good place to start, and make wonderful gifts. You mentioned Ukraine, and you're from a part of the country where there are many people of Eastern European origins. If you were to learn to make a good Potica, you'd have our hearts forever! But that is very advanced.

A really basic meal? Take a bird (anything from a cornish game hen for two to a turkey for a dozen) and stuff with a lemon or two (a game hen will take one half of a lemon, larger birds an entire lemon, pierced). If you can get fresh herbs at your grocer, throw in a branch of thyme and one of sage. If not, sprinkle the dried herbs in the cavity. Rub the skin with oil or butter, then bake according to any cookbook's timing.

This bird will fly in a number of meals. Mashed or baked potatoes, etc, for an all-American meal. Couscous (I like Near East brand, where you just pour boiling water or stock over the pasta, then fluff and add raisins and nuts to make a yummy starch for the meal). Rice pilaf. The lemon permeates the flavor of the meat, yet you can make it almost any ethnic cuisine you choose.
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Old 09-21-2007, 02:05 PM   #5
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Smile Potica? Yes indeed, challenge me

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David, do you prefer baking or cooking meals? I'm very much the latter, but if you like sweets and/or breads, it is a good place to start, and make wonderful gifts. You mentioned Ukraine, and you're from a part of the country where there are many people of Eastern European origins. If you were to learn to make a good Potica, you'd have our hearts forever! But that is very advanced.
My, my, Potica - Yes! Challenge me! I just googled the images and took a quick look at a recipe. One must mustn't one? Do you have a favotite potica recipe - authentic now! I will guarantee to report back when I have a success. With something like this three trys is generally minimum. As to cooking - I don't have enough depth to be choosey as to type. I would lean more to cooking dishes for the main part of the meal.

Let me know if you would care to post that special recipe here or just to attach it to me david.cottrell1@verizon.net. You are welcome to visit Books by Volunteers who serve Ukraine Orphans if I haven't invited you. Thanks a bunch.

Did you see the Menu for a Ukrainian Christmas Eve Holy Supper - I posted it in the borsch(t) or the beet soup thread - that was a trip I'll tell you. Wonderful experience.
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Old 09-22-2007, 08:26 AM   #6
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I've tried to make potica exactly ONCE. I used a combination of recipes from Jeff Smith (our immigrant ancestors, I think the title is) and a cookbook called something like "all along the Danube" (my cookbooks are upstairs). As long as the recipe calls for a yeast dough, it is authentic enough (I lost my mother-in-law's recipe many moons ago). Filling can be walnuts or poppy seed (both with butter and brown sugar). Don't use the poppy seed if you're in a profession that requires drug testing (yes, you can come up with a false positive. Yes, in the long run it will show that you ate poppy seeds, but who needs the grief in between?). The difficult part is NOT the recipe, it is the technique. You put a sheet on your biggest table, and you stretch the dough until it is transparently thin. THAT is the hard part. Then you spread the filling over the dough. Getting it even is very difficult as well. Then you roll it. The time I tried it, it tasted fine, but instead of a nice, tight roll like my MIL's, it was lumpy and uneven. Now I buy mine from Vermont Country Store, or have friends in parts of the Midwest where it is popular send it to me. I'm a baking wimp!
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Old 09-22-2007, 08:28 AM   #7
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When I go upstairs later today, I'll post a recipe.
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Old 09-22-2007, 08:39 AM   #8
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Too funny. I've already started to worry about Thanksgiving dinner! I have my 3 brothers and their families over, meaning 22 people trying to find a place to sit in a very small house. Combine that with our 2 tiny dogs running around like crazy things and my 3 brothers insisting on getting into the kitchen to 'sample' and 'make sure things taste good - it's their duty, you know', and it's a mad house. I do all the cooking and they do all the eating!

But, we always have a great time, just being together. So, this year, my resolution is not to obsess about everything being perfect, because the food isn't really what it's all about!

Wish me luck on that...!

-Mary
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Old 09-22-2007, 08:44 AM   #9
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I am starting to think of holiday dinners, ours are usually the same menu each year. (Tradition is the name of the game at my house). Tried something different one year ----- just wasn't Christmas - strange !
I will be making a turkey breast, ham, candied yams, corn, cranberries, dressing, mashed potatoes /gravy and hot rolls. Dessert, pumpkin and pecan pie. (There are only seven of us)
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Old 09-22-2007, 10:30 AM   #10
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What a Challenge!

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When I go upstairs later today, I'll post a recipe.
Be glad to use it - I guess I have committed to this in my mind. Yes, I remember reading about philo being made this way - a bunch of ladies around the large table gently pulling the dough out to transparency. Hope this doesn't have to go that far - the images I looked at don't look like the dough was stretched that far. Am I wrong? Looks like a minimum three try effort.

Never fear, a lovely lady from Ukraine shared with me an awsome torte recipe that I have to psych myself up for about a week to do, and I've made it six or eight times. Not to a beautiful standard I'm sure, but everyone really likes this unusual treat. I wasn't surprised when Olga told me she taught art in the first Montesori school in Ukraine before coming here. Be glad to share her recipe. It's kinda long to post the way I have it but would be glad to attach to an email. To meet her beautiful work go to htt://eggs-files.tripod.com.
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