"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Menu Planning > Special Events Planning & Holiday Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-01-2006, 06:09 PM   #1
Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Belgium
Posts: 89
Kosher dinner emergency

Sorry DC ladies and gentlemen, but I need some help once more... I invited a jewish (ie. citizen of the state of Israel) friend and his wife and daughter for dinner next sunday. I know that away from his family he doesn't care at all about kosher food (or anything else to do with religion). We even had black pudding with applesauce (well knowing what black pudding is!) on a business lunch once and he absolutely loved it. But he also told me that his wife is a little more conventional. So not to offend anyone, I'd prefer to put a (more or less) kosher meal together.
Is there anything else a big no-no apart from porc and shellfish?
Can I use for example passover recipe's on a regular sunday or would this be concidered offensive?
Does anyone want to share his or her's kosher recipe's?

Thanks a lot in advance everyone!

PS: living in the center of Antwerp, obtaining kosher ingredients is fairly easy. there's dozens of kosher shope and supermarkets here... it's preparing these ingredients that scares me.

__________________

__________________
Tonight let us eat, drink and be merry for tomorrow we die.
Hades is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2006, 07:23 PM   #2
Head Chef
 
auntdot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,418
Gosh, Kosher is such a difficult topic, because people observe the laws so differently.

I work with a man whose cousins will not eat at his house, even to the point of shunning a cup of tea. They are rabbis who adhere to the Kosher regulations very strictly.

If you cannot talk with your friend prior to the dinner to find out what the wife will eat, I would just adhere to the basics.

No meat and dairy combined.

Going to a Kosher butcher is a good idea, you cannot go wrong there. (Any meat from the rear end of the critter, i.e. leg of lamb is not Kosher, so the butcher will not be selling that.)

Other than that I would sort of just cook.

A person who observes the Kosher laws to the ultimate degree would not marry someone who pays no mind to them.

So I would honor them by doing your best as the host and relax.

Have a great time.
__________________

__________________
auntdot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2006, 08:11 PM   #3
Executive Chef
 
amber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Maine
Posts: 4,099
There is a bit of information in the General cooking questions forum. Do a search for kosher foods and you should find it.
__________________
amber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2006, 09:05 PM   #4
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
The kasrut laws are vast and complicated. There are so many layers to them and as auntdot said each person observes them in their own way. For someone who is observing to the biggest degree, nothing made in your kitchen will be kosher so it would not matter what you cooked or didn't cook. Thankfully most people who do keep kosher know how to adapt in situations in which keeping kosher is not always possible.

The very major things to keep in mind are no mixing of meat and dairy. People who keep kosher generally have separate plates and utensils for meat and dairy. Some have separate dishwashers and even separate refrigerators.

Animals that are scavengers are forbidden.

Shellfish is forbidden.

Only animals which chew their cud and are cloven-hoofed are allowed.

Fish must have fins and scales.

Blood is forbidden to be consumed.

Again these are just some basic rules. It gets a lot more in depth than this. any attempt that you make I am sure will be appreciated.
Kosher for passover and regular kosher are different animals all together. Kosher for passover has to do with the prohibition of eating anything that rises when cooked. This is not an issue during times other than Passover.

If you want to post what you are planning on serving then we can let you know (as best we can) if it is kosher or not.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2006, 09:39 PM   #5
Head Chef
 
Chopstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,323
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Animals that are scavengers are forbidden.
Is catfish forbidden then? Ooopsy.... I once served Thai crispy catfish salad to a Jewish friend from NYC and his parents from the Poconos. They ate it anyway although now I need to know if they were just being tactful. Somebody tell me pls..pls..Thanks!
__________________
'Never eat more than you can lift.' - Miss Piggy
Chopstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2006, 09:45 PM   #6
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
I am not 100% sure, but I believe catfish is not kosher. Catfish do not have scales I don't think so that would make it non kosher right there.

Chopstix, do your friends keep kosher or are they just Jewish? The vast majority of Jews (at least in the US) do not keep kosher. I am Jewish and regularly eat pork, shellfish, meat with dairy, etc. I Know well over 100 Jews and maybe 2 of them keep kosher.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2006, 09:49 PM   #7
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Northern California
Posts: 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Animals that are scavengers are forbidden.

Animals that are scavengers are forbidden.

Shellfish is forbidden.

Only animals which chew their cud and are cloven-hoofed are allowed.

Fish must have fins and scales.

Blood is forbidden to be consumed.
Poultry doesn't strictly meet the general guidelines listed above, however, it should be noted that there is Kosher poultry available at a Kosher butcher.
__________________
Aurora is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2006, 09:56 PM   #8
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Aurora, as I mentioned, these are by no means all of the rules. I am assuming you are refering to the rule about only animals that chew their cud and are cloven hoofed are allowed. That really only applies to mammals. Generally, (again this is just in the US) chicken, turkey, duck and goose are the only accepted poultry. The have to be killed and prepared a certain way (as with all animals) to be considered kosher.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2006, 10:19 PM   #9
Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Belgium
Posts: 89
Wow, thanks so far everyone. You guys realy saved my day .
I was thinking of serving:
* Chicken broth (saw about a dozen recipe's for it on kosher food sites) made from kosher chicken ofcourse. Shouldn't be too hard to find in a kosher supermarket I guess.
* some kind of fish in a creamy (fish stock, cream, seasoning) sauce. Probably with some vermouth or white wine. The local fish shop is doing a month's special on dover sole if that's ok. (it has scales and fins... sort of)
* I was thinking of doing a beef wellington from the kosher shop but with the none-dairy rule I changed my mind to maybe a beef roast with a reduced wine sauce with the usual seasonings and a vegetable and steamed potato (avoiding cream, butter and eggs in a potato mash).
* some sort of a desert... not sure yet what it will be. I hope a combination of milk or cream, eggs, and fruits is ok.

Edit: does the meat have to be well done all over?
__________________
Tonight let us eat, drink and be merry for tomorrow we die.
Hades is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2006, 10:26 PM   #10
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
As far as I can tell, dover sole is kosher and I don't believe serving it in a cream sauce is a problem. You would not be able to serve the beef roast or the chicken broth though because of the cream in the sauce from the fish.

The dessert does not sound like it will be a problem.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.