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Old 11-16-2010, 11:20 PM   #11
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Oh, but a few mushrooms, a tiny bit of wine...well, to each his own. My dh prefers it out of a can...:(
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Old 11-17-2010, 12:03 AM   #12
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Oh, but a few mushrooms, a tiny bit of wine...well, to each his own. My dh prefers it out of a can...:(
I love mushroom gravy! For Thanksgiving though, I like the traditional gravy we always had.

Barbara
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Old 11-17-2010, 12:16 AM   #13
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i do it simply as well.

i just add some water to the roasting pan ( there's usually not enough liquid leftover from basting the bird) to help scrape up the fond on the bottom of the pan.

it goes into a tall quart container and into the fridge to let the fat rise to the top. when the fat rises out, most of it is scooped off, then the remainder is put into a wide sautee pan to reduce a bit.

when reduced, s&p is added to taste, and a cornstarch slurry stirred in to thicken it.
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Old 11-17-2010, 02:24 AM   #14
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when reduced, s&p is added to taste, and a cornstarch slurry stirred in to thicken it.
If I don't cook a medium brown roux, Shrek pouts...he loves the smell of it cooking.

He loves the smell a brick red roux even better.
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Old 11-17-2010, 01:35 PM   #15
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I don't use a lot of herbs but I do like it to have a bit of flavor or else why not just use bottle, can or package?
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Old 11-17-2010, 02:17 PM   #16
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I went looking for this old post of mine..... good results, made about 6 cups of gravy (i.e., 5 cups for me, the rest for the rest)

We [my sis and I were in charge of gravy that year] used ALL of the drippings from the roasting pan. Didn't even bother to dump any out, just started shaking flour over it. Maybe half a cup of flour in all. We kinda made a roux first, but kept whisking and adding what looked right at the moment (flour, butter, or liquid). Lotta butter -probably half a stick when it was all said and done.

For liquid, we used a carton of Kitchen Basics chicken stock, plus the cooking water (2 cups?) from the turkey neckbone, which I had boiled up with a couple hunks of celery, a few baby carrots, about a quarter of on onion, some peppercorns, and salt. I shredded out the meat and added it at the last minute.

Oh, and we did it all in the turkey roasting pan over two burners.
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Old 11-17-2010, 03:44 PM   #17
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I really didn't intend for the post heading to include giblets, I just want to know how everyone makes THEIR Thanksgiving gravy. I should have asked the question in the title to the post to be clearer. I'm enjoying the answers.

I too made it like you, MudBug, unfortunately I got carried away with the spices and it ended up too strong. Now I try to keep it as simple as possible, because, like most people agree, the best gravy is the simplest and highlights the food instead of overpowering it.
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Old 11-17-2010, 10:05 PM   #18
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Any spice in my gravy is from any stuffing dribble into the roasting pan...or I put a spoonful in if it didn't dribble.
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Old 11-17-2010, 11:50 PM   #19
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Any spice in my gravy is from any stuffing dribble into the roasting pan...or I put a spoonful in if it didn't dribble.
That's a good idea!
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Old 11-18-2010, 12:08 AM   #20
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i forgot to add that the turkey is rubbed with a few spices, so as it gets basted, some if it runs off flavouring the eventual gravy.

also, the turkey's neck goes into the bottom corner of the pan under the rack while the turkey roasts to add more taste to the drippings/basting liquid. my mom, bil, and i like to nibble on the neck after it's cooked.

my wife usually chucks the giblets, but if i get there in time i save them, chop them up and make a turkey offal fry with some onions, bacon, and butter the next day.
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