"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy > Cobblers & Crisps
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-28-2013, 08:17 AM   #11
Head Chef
 
letscook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Finger Lakes of NY
Posts: 1,879
Whenever I make apple crisp or pie - I always use equal parts of 3 different kinds- Generally it is Macintosh, Macouns or Empires and red or golden delious. those are the ones that I get the biggest compliments from
__________________

__________________
One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching
letscook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2013, 08:27 AM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by singer92 View Post
I found a very basic recipe for apple crisp and it states to use apples (well duh!).

What is the best apple or combination of apples to use for apple crisp? I want a good flavor!
We have cooking apple called a Bramley but it doesn't seem to exist anywhere else in the world. Good flavour but very tart. It "falls" well so makes good apple sauce but for a crisp or crumble or pie it's better mixed with something which holds its shape. Do you have Cox's Orange Pippins where you are? They are a late summer/early autumn apple but keep well over the winter and have a lovely rich flavour.
__________________

__________________
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2013, 04:36 PM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,032
The following popped up on my DC site at the top today. Very interesting. I am sure any brand can be used.

Best apple crisp recipe from Prince.

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2013, 05:54 PM   #14
Master Chef
 
Cooking Goddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Body in MA ~ Heart in OH
Posts: 8,248
That's not "apple crisp" Addie, that's "apple lasagna"!

My favorite is Gala, hands down. Use it for pies, in crisps, to eat out-of-hand. If you want a little "sauce" with the apple slices you need to add another type that will cook down more since the Gala keeps its texture even after baking.

One year after we built our first home but before the kids came along Himself did a fair amount of travelling during the week. Most every Thursday on my way home from work I would stop at a little apple farm along my route, buy the variety of apple that had ripened most recently, and greeted him with a different apple pie every Friday night. Started with Lodi Greening and ended up with Melrose. Lord, how I miss Melrose, the official apple of Ohio. Good thing SIL and her hubby lived about 5 miles away. We didn't have to eat an entire pie by ourselves every week!
__________________
... nothing is given. Everything is earned. You work for what you have... ~~~ LeBron James
Cooking Goddess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2013, 12:04 AM   #15
Senior Cook
 
Kitchen Barbarian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 160
I bake with whatever apples are currently on sale. In my neck of the woods, that is usually Gala, Fuji, Granny Smith, and sometimes Jazz. MacIntoshes when I can get them. Yes, I make pies with Macs. I have recently been repeatedly told that you cannot make apple pie with Macs, because they will allegedly turn into mush.

No, they don't, not if you treat 'em right. Fortunately I had never been told this little bit of "wisdom" 45 years ago when I was learning to make apple pies, LOL! I got other, truer wisdom instead about how to make my apple pies non-soggy without having to resort to loads of tapioca or cornflakes in the bottom of the crust!

I did a side-by-side comparison and while it's true that Macs tend to be a little softer than some other apples, they hold their shape just fine. In fact I suspect I probably could have done better but may have overcooked them a bit as it had been awhile since I'd baked with a Mac, due to not being able to find them for several years running. And the Mac pie tasted way better.

Note that I do not mention any "delicious" type. Those are not apples. They are apple-shaped objects that ship very well due to having ridiculously thick skins, and they have very little apple flavor. When my son was little he told me not to buy those at the grocery store because he had had one at the day care and (according to him) "they don't taste like apples at all", LOL!
__________________
Kitchen Barbarian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2013, 12:12 AM   #16
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,283
I can get as many Macs as I want every year. A friend has an orchard and I am free to pick as many as I like. As long as I pick the same amount for him and his cider press.
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2013, 12:19 AM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,095
Oh drat, this reminds me that I have one more grocery bag of home-growns left to process. Not to mention the full fridge drawer full of apples. I'm kinda sick of apples by now.

This was an off year for our apple tree. In on years, I've had to do drive-by apple bag drop-offs.
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2013, 10:53 AM   #18
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitchen Barbarian View Post
I bake with whatever apples are currently on sale. In my neck of the woods, that is usually Gala, Fuji, Granny Smith, and sometimes Jazz. MacIntoshes when I can get them. Yes, I make pies with Macs. I have recently been repeatedly told that you cannot make apple pie with Macs, because they will allegedly turn into mush.

No, they don't, not if you treat 'em right. Fortunately I had never been told this little bit of "wisdom" 45 years ago when I was learning to make apple pies, LOL! I got other, truer wisdom instead about how to make my apple pies non-soggy without having to resort to loads of tapioca or cornflakes in the bottom of the crust!

I did a side-by-side comparison and while it's true that Macs tend to be a little softer than some other apples, they hold their shape just fine. In fact I suspect I probably could have done better but may have overcooked them a bit as it had been awhile since I'd baked with a Mac, due to not being able to find them for several years running. And the Mac pie tasted way better.

Note that I do not mention any "delicious" type. Those are not apples. They are apple-shaped objects that ship very well due to having ridiculously thick skins, and they have very little apple flavor. When my son was little he told me not to buy those at the grocery store because he had had one at the day care and (according to him) "they don't taste like apples at all", LOL!
With you on "Delicious" apples. We get an abomination called "Golden Delicious" - mostly grown in France for the supermarket trade. As someone once wrote in the newspaper, they should be had up under the Trades Description Act because they are neither golden nor delicious!

We get a lot of apples from France - mostly rubbish and no self-respecting French person would give them house-room. The difference between a French Braeburn and a New Zealand one is absolutely unbelievable. They don't taste like the same apple.

My favourite "eating" apple is the Granny Smith. Again, the French ones aren't worth buying (I wonder why?), the ones from Chile are usually very tart but "Cape" ones (from South Africa) are my favourites. Sadly we don't grow them here. We also have Cox's Orange Pippin which is a late apple that keeps well through the winter. It can be used like the French Reinette as it keeps iy's shape when cooked
__________________
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2013, 12:35 PM   #19
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,032
I am surrounded by apple orchards. And it is still the time of farmers market. I can also go in town to Fanuiel Hall market and get fresh picked that morning, any kind I want. Eating or cooking.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2013, 01:20 PM   #20
Executive Chef
 
bakechef's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 4,082
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
With you on "Delicious" apples. We get an abomination called "Golden Delicious" - mostly grown in France for the supermarket trade. As someone once wrote in the newspaper, they should be had up under the Trades Description Act because they are neither golden nor delicious!

We get a lot of apples from France - mostly rubbish and no self-respecting French person would give them house-room. The difference between a French Braeburn and a New Zealand one is absolutely unbelievable. They don't taste like the same apple.

My favourite "eating" apple is the Granny Smith. Again, the French ones aren't worth buying (I wonder why?), the ones from Chile are usually very tart but "Cape" ones (from South Africa) are my favourites. Sadly we don't grow them here. We also have Cox's Orange Pippin which is a late apple that keeps well through the winter. It can be used like the French Reinette as it keeps iy's shape when cooked
I guess it all has to do with climate. Honey Crisp is a really popular apple here, but the only good ones are from cooler northern climates, the ones grown here in western North Carolina don't even taste like the same apple! The ones from places like Washington state are fantastic, crisp and sweet.

I went to the farmer's market this week and the lady that sold me apples from her orchard steered me to an apple variety called Cameo, they were delicious, sweet, crisp exactly what I look for in an apple. She steered me to a variety called Stayman Winesap for cooking and they made a fantastic apple pie without turning to mush! I usually use Granny Smith for pie, but these performed the same with a more apple-ly flavor.
__________________

__________________
I'm Bloggin'

http://bakingbetter.com
bakechef is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
other

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.