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Old 09-09-2014, 12:43 PM   #31
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I think that those who rely on food stamps / food banks probably could relate to rationing. Prices have gone way up--I picked up 3 lb of butter on special the other day--about 1/2 the "usual" price. I don't plant a garden because I have too much time on my hands, I do so I can have cabbage, leeks, tomatoes, a variety of hot peppers, greens, etc. so I can have the variety I want in my diet. It is a trade off--time dedicated to the garden vs. time spent at the Lake, a friend's pool, a weekend away.

From 2007 - 2013, times were tough financially. The food that I went without included cheese and meat. I learned to eat what I could afford and to walk by the cheese section...I love cheese.

I was in the grocery store yesterday to get some coarse salt and cruised by the meat counter to see if anything was on special (nothing was). There were several people dismayed by the prices--"It would be cheaper to buy my own steer." I heard one elderly woman mutter under her breath. I also noticed that the elderly person ahead of me at the check out had a lot of produce that was 50% off.
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Old 09-09-2014, 01:06 PM   #32
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I found an interesting link that includes excerpts from Ration Cookbooks.

11 Awesome Pages from World War II Ration Cookbooks | Mental Floss

I don't remember my parents ever discussing food rationing, but during WW2 my dad was overseas in France with an infantry battalion, and my mom, although dating my dad, was living with her parents on their family farm. My parents were married two weeks after he returned home from the war.
Mum & dad met (at a dance) during the war and were married in 1941. The first time she visited her future parents-in-law she was appalled to find that Dad's mother had a very cavalier attitude to rationing. She was a hairdresser and often sneakily reserved perming lotions and other hairdressing products for farmers' wives who offered the odd egg or two or pat of butter in part payment. Mum's mother had a son in the navy and wouldn't have considered using the "black market" if she and her family had been starving!
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Old 09-09-2014, 01:44 PM   #33
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Interesting, I wonder how would she conduct experiment if her daily ration was 500 gr of bread? The norm for a working adult during war in Soviet Union.
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Old 09-09-2014, 01:59 PM   #34
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Since I'm a dozen years younger than you, I didn't grow up during the Depression. However, I consider Challah or any dense, barely sweet bread, toasted and sprinkled with cinnamon sugar, as "dessert". Cranberry/pecan toast that way? Oh !

To this day I still have my Grandma's purse, complete with ration coupon books for food and liquor. I remember my Mom telling me Grandma would hang on to those liquor stamps until my Dad would be home on leave. She figured the only people who deserved to drink were the military people fighting for our freedom. God Bless Grandma and the U.S.A.!

By the way Addie, since rationing ended in 1946 when you were about 7 years old, I hope you were the baby of your family. Hate to think your Mom let you wander the beach clamming alone!
I would go down there with a bunch of other kids. We all went clamming and harvesting lobsters. We learned very young. We gave no argue. We just knew it was for the family. My mother had polio and I remember at about four, I had to do things to help her. I grew up fast. And my sister had even more responsibilities. My father worked at the Charlestown Naval Yard. So he wasn't draft material. One day he went to walk across a plank from one ship to the one next to it. Whoever put the plank there didn't secure it properly and my father went down and landed on his feet. But the shock of the landing cost him the vision in one eye. I remember my mother opening the door and the policeman was standing there. Then my mother let out a scream and the cop had to help her to a chair. After about an hour she took the change out of her apron pocket and went out the door to go to the hospital to see my father. They kept him for about a week and then he came home. Stayed home a week and then went back to work at the Navy Yard.

I do remember a lot about the war. The blackouts, the black curtains, the warden in the backyard checking and yelling to cover the windows. I hated the blackouts. I remember the red and blue coupons and their value was in cents. The book of coupons were the dollar ones. I had it drilled in my head, when I ran to the store with ration money, it was very precious and I better not lose any of it. If I ever found any on the street, it was a big event and meant something extra my mother could buy.

I also remember the planes taking off all day long from Logan Field as it was called at that time. When I was around 12 or so, I used to go out there and ride my bike on the runway. Then someone would come out an yell at me to get off the runway, someone wanted to land. If I wasn't at Wood Island Park clamming, I was riding my bike on the runway. I remember the war years very well and the continued rationing after the way.
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Old 09-09-2014, 03:16 PM   #35
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My parents didn't talk much about war time rationing. They mentioned having to bring ration books to restos. They told me about cars converted to run on coal.

My mum told me far more about going hungry during the great depression. She moved away from home at 18 in 1932. Her mother would save the ends of "rugbrød" (heavy, dark rye bread) for her and say that she was just going to throw them away otherwise. In some weird way, saying that they would otherwise be thrown out, saved my mother's pride.
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Old 09-09-2014, 03:25 PM   #36
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My parents didn't talk much about war time rationing. They mentioned having to bring ration books to restos. They told me about cars converted to run on coal.

My mum told me far more about going hungry during the great depression. She moved away from home at 18 in 1932. Her mother would save the ends of "rugbrød" (heavy, dark rye bread) for her and say that she was just going to throw them away otherwise. In some weird way, saying that they would otherwise be thrown out, saved my mother's pride.
My mother was born in 1932. She remembers one winter during the Depression when she and her brother were given $10 to go to the grocery store. On the way, they lost the $10. That week, my mom said all they had to eat was cabbage and tomato soup, grandma's homemade dark bread, and eggs from their flock. She and her brother Jack looked and looked but could not find that $10 they lost in the snow. The next week, my grandma pinned the money to my mother's dress. My parents were fortunate--my dad's side of the family had money; my mom's side of the family had faith and provided a much needed service in the community (pharmacist) so they had a means of keeping food on the table. And, my maternal side of the family figured out early on how to forage, hunt, fish, garden, and raise laying hens.
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Old 09-09-2014, 06:50 PM   #37
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Interesting, I wonder how would she conduct experiment if her daily ration was 500 gr of bread? The norm for a working adult during war in Soviet Union.
Bread wasn't rationed until after the war in the UK, when the bad harvest due to bad weather in 1946 caused a severe shortage.

Without wishing to be being political, the system used from the late 1920s through the 1930s in Russia lead to severe shortages even before the war.
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Old 09-09-2014, 08:35 PM   #38
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Thank you ALL for the memories and links! Wow!

My grandmother was given a pair of red patent shoes just before shoes were rationed due to WWII. I remember her telling me that, with two growing children, she wanted to save her shoe rations for them. So she would wear her old shoes and walk miles to town towing my uncle's old wagon. When she arrived to where the town's sidewalk started, she slipped out of the old shoes and put on her red shoes to do her marketing. I can easily see her doing that and the memory makes me smile.

My mother said they would save their gas rations so they could make a trip to see her grandmother each month. My maternal great-grandmother ran a dairy, so they could stretch their rations by paying her a visit but it took three weeks rations to safely make the trip.

One of my great aunts told me that she and her friends would time when they made certain things as the liquid that something was cooked in would be given to one another so everyone had some seasoned liquid for cooking. Toward the end, they would pool their resources and make a kettle of soup!

While I hope never to have this kind of need, I love the camaraderie and sense of community.

A car that runs on coal.....amazing!
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Old 09-09-2014, 09:18 PM   #39
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There was some heavy duty stuff had to be added to the car to run it on coal or wood. Here's an article that's mostly pix of those retrofitted cars: COAL AND WOOD BURNING VEHICLES OF WWII

Here's another article: http://www.lowtechmagazine.com/2010/...-gas-cars.html
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Old 09-10-2014, 07:54 AM   #40
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Here's a link to some Depression era recipes:

21 Classic Great Depression Era Recipes | RecipeLion.com

Bacon must have been a lot less spendy then.
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