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Old 10-23-2013, 07:23 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
I guess I have a foot firmly planted in each camp.

I think that we have gone through the better living through science phase and now we have sufficient information to grow, harvest, deliver and if necessary preserve foods in as close to a natural state as possible. Now it is time to start raising the ethical standards of the world's food producers and processors. We also need to make a shift in our own priorities as consumers, nutritious food and clean water should be more of a priority than a 60 inch flat screen television or a pair of designer jeans. We need to put the quality and safety of our food supply ahead of price. I think over time the increased costs for food would be offset by lower costs in healthcare. These things always seem to take at least a generation to make a real change. Look at the simple changes we have seen in our own lifetime, things like seat belts, helmets for bicyclists, ending smoking etc...

I'm done rambling and ranting, for now!
I agree. It would probably shock people to know that today we spend a much smaller percent of our income on food compared to the previous generation. I read somewhere that 50 years ago the average was 18% of the household income was spent on food, today the average is somewhere around 10%.

We have a whole lot more luxuries today and food seems to have taken a back seat to those. Monthly smartphone bills, lots of technology, families with 2 cars and 2 car payments, much larger houses, utility bills to keep them climate controlled etc... Don't get me wrong, I really embrace a lot of these things myself, but I wouldn't start eating $1 pot pies and canned soup to maintain the luxuries!
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Old 10-23-2013, 01:43 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
I guess I have a foot firmly planted in each camp.

I think that we have gone through the better living through science phase and now we have sufficient information to grow, harvest, deliver and if necessary preserve foods in as close to a natural state as possible. Now it is time to start raising the ethical standards of the world's food producers and processors. We also need to make a shift in our own priorities as consumers, nutritious food and clean water should be more of a priority than a 60 inch flat screen television or a pair of designer jeans. We need to put the quality and safety of our food supply ahead of price. I think over time the increased costs for food would be offset by lower costs in healthcare. These things always seem to take at least a generation to make a real change. Look at the simple changes we have seen in our own lifetime, things like seat belts, helmets for bicyclists, ending smoking etc...

I'm done rambling and ranting, for now!
I heartily agree.
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Old 10-23-2013, 05:04 PM   #13
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Interesting history perspective. I hope she doesn't think I'm a Luddite because I want my food to be made of food.
I don't understand what you mean by "I want my food to be made of food."
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Old 10-23-2013, 05:08 PM   #14
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I don't understand what you mean by "I want my food to be made of food."
It means I don't want a bunch of weird additives.
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Old 12-08-2013, 05:21 PM   #15
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Slowly, but surely we are getting there Aunt Bea. Look at all the rivers we have cleaned up. Companies can no long just dump their waste material any place they choose to. We have learned about runoff of pesticides from farmlands into rivers. More and more farmers are turning to organic farming. Now if we could just get the beef industry to stop feeding corn and grain to the cattle, then we would have healthier animals for our meals.
It isn't the corn and the grain per se. It's what "they" add to them - growth hormones, antibiotics, etc., etc.
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Old 12-08-2013, 05:41 PM   #16
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It isn't the corn and the grain per se. It's what "they" add to them - growth hormones, antibiotics, etc., etc.
Preventive antibiotics are definitely a bad idea. Bovine growth hormone, though, has no effect on humans. When taken orally, it's broken down by digestive enzymes and rendered inactive. The U.S. government once performed an experiment using bovine growth hormone to try to treat dwarfism. It had no effect.

Food Safety Fact Sheet: Bovine Somatotropin in Milk

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Effect of BST on Humans
An early test of bovine growth hormone was as a possible treatment for children suffering from hypopituitary dwarfism. Although the bovine hormone was injected in large doses, it did not affect the children. An extract from human pituitary glands was successful. There is not enough similarity between human and bovine growth hormone for bovine produced growth hormone to cause desirable or undesirable effects in humans.
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Old 12-08-2013, 06:30 PM   #17
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Corn and grains are not natural foods for cattle. They are grass animals. When the cattle first enter the "fattening up system", they refuse to eat. It is only a week later when they are really hungry that the will approach the feed trough. If you hold a cattle in one of those pens long enough eating corn, they will die. And you would be surprised at how many do. They are quickly scooped up and sent to be processed. You would be surprised at how many cattle farmers only eat grass fed animals.
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Old 12-08-2013, 07:14 PM   #18
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When talking about what cattle produce for our tables now (agribusiness) if labeled 'grass-fed' then it's supposed to be raised on pasture grass and never 'finished' with grain or corn. (I'm not sure how that's regulated, though---- just like cage-free??)

But back in the day----- range cattle fed on grasses that eventually matured and there was plenty of grain associated with those grasses: oats, rye, wheat etc. That was 'natural' food for them at that time.

Now, because animals raised on one type of food are suspicious of anything else----- I'm sure cattle in feed lots would avoid grain until they were really hungry.
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Old 12-09-2013, 02:24 PM   #19
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When talking about what cattle produce for our tables now (agribusiness) if labeled 'grass-fed' then it's supposed to be raised on pasture grass and never 'finished' with grain or corn. (I'm not sure how that's regulated, though---- just like cage-free??)

But back in the day----- range cattle fed on grasses that eventually matured and there was plenty of grain associated with those grasses: oats, rye, wheat etc. That was 'natural' food for them at that time.

Now, because animals raised on one type of food are suspicious of anything else----- I'm sure cattle in feed lots would avoid grain until they were really hungry.
You make some good points. How do we know it was actually grass fed. We could start certifying, but that's a real PITA for the farmers - ask any organic certified farmer. The certification also adds to the cost. I wish we could just trust them.

I hadn't thought about the fact that range fed cattle must have eaten some grain. It's probably better for them in smaller quantities.

And about animals being suspicious of a new type of food. I have the perfect example in my home. My cat won't eat raw food, even though he ate every mouse he caught and I sure as heck didn't cook them for him.
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Old 12-09-2013, 02:38 PM   #20
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I was just reading (Internet) on certification for Grass Fed but a friend is going to drop by so that's something that will have to wait. (Did I mention that I'm really nosy?)

Wild animals being 'suspicious' about new foods probably saved their lives. But a spoiled kitty? LOL But if you really loved your cat you'd cook the mice for it!

Talk about food and animals/fowl---- I had the enlightening experience of brooding some turkey eggs once. That was the easy part.

When they hatched I had to teach them to eat and drink water. (Turkey's aren't noted for their IQ) No mother hen around to teach them I had to wad up bits of aluminum foil and put in the water feeders. They would peck at the foil (too big to swallow) and discover---- Hey! this water is GOOD.

Same thing with the turkey mash. Oy, the joys of being a mother.
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