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Old 12-02-2015, 07:21 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
You're absolutely right GG.

On the other hand, after keeping up with the pitiful "progress" since my Dad died of this in the '80's, it gives some real hope for early reversal beyond pharmaceuticals.
There certainly would be no harm in keeping the recommended healthy practices a life style. Food for thought at any rate.
You're right, it's good to keep up with new developments. I just wanted to caution people about reading too much into the results of one small study.
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Old 12-02-2015, 07:24 AM   #12
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Addie, where did I use the word "white" in my post? I said "bread". I rarely buy white, and never the standard Wonder Bread (Dad would roll over in his grave - he sold Ward's Tip-Top) or other "sponge bread". I buy Panera bread often, and also whole-grain types from Market Basket. Whole wheat, multi-grain, rye, and oatmeal ARE the norm in our house. Have been for ages. Since the weather is now getting cold, I might even get back to making home-made bread (finally). The no-knead, slow-rise bread just might be what I need to give me a push. I don't mind running the oven when it's heating season - would rather not turn on the oven during the summer.
You didn't. Ward's Tip Top bread? I haven't heard that name since my teen years.
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Old 12-02-2015, 08:23 AM   #13
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It's an interesting article but when it describes what is involved, i.e. not just one factor but throwing in the mix a hotch potch of things, it suggests that they haven't yet managed to pinpoint any one of these factors independently as being responsible for reversing memory loss. The indication is that they might all contribute to some degree though.

Also Vit B12 is not advisable to take on its own since all the B vitamins are synergistic, i.e. work together - one affecting the balance of the other. A Vit B complex would be preferable/more advantageous.

I would more welcome how Alzheimers can be prevented. My mum has a form of dementia and watching her deterioration - such a dilution of the person she once was - is quite horrifying. Indeed, losing my mental faculties is what I most fear about growing older.
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Old 12-02-2015, 12:20 PM   #14
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Here's additional information about the study. The case history of the patients are particularly stunning.

http://impactaging.com/papers/v6/n9/full/100690.html
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Old 12-02-2015, 01:06 PM   #15
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I have great sympathy for people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and those whose lives have been affected by it. I just wanted to say something about evaluating "studies." This is not one, regardless of what ABC News calls it. It's a report, as the author says, and it's not really about AD - it's about memory loss, which is only one of the symptoms of AD. Only five of the 10 participants were diagnosed with AD.

The bottom line is that they ate better, got more exercise, lost weight and got more sleep. That's not a new approach. We all know we need to do these things.

I think Dr. David Katz, a nutrition researcher at Yale, has a great way of putting it: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20131...ess-as-we-seem

His credentials:
David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACPM, FACP has, as noted, broken bread with many of the world's leading nutrition experts. A few of them, on the other hand, have broken a baguette over his head. You can't please everybody.

Director, Yale University Prevention Research Center; Griffin Hospital
President, American College of Lifestyle Medicine
Editor-in-Chief, Childhood Obesity

Founder, The GLiMMER Initiative

Follow at: LinkedIN; Twitter; Facebook
Read at: INfluencer Blog; Huffington Post; US News & World Report; About.com
Author: Disease Proof
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Old 12-02-2015, 01:17 PM   #16
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I also recommend this article, also by Dr. Katz, about the intersection of pop culture and the media when it comes to diet and nutrition:

Optimal Human Nutrition? There, There...
http://huff.to/1CKx1ky
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Old 12-02-2015, 01:31 PM   #17
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Dementia is dementia. It all starts with memory loss. The steady decline of my Dad in the '80's took 10 long years till the end. Then, and maybe even now, firm diagnosis of Alzheimers was autopsy of the brain, and I preferred not to know for sure. The fact that his sister, and mother all died of the same was enough alarm for me. My point is, in the early stages, I wish I had known all this at the start. I would have welcomed a ray of hope free of drugs.
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Old 12-02-2015, 02:23 PM   #18
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I'm sorry, Kayelle. That must have been awful.

I'm trying to focus specifically on evaluating news reports about medicine and nutrition. IMO, the headline is misleading. It's not a study - it's a set of case reports. The patients didn't all make the same changes, we don't know what their physical health was like, and there was no control group.

We also don't have the big picture. If you're like me, you glossed over most of that second article because it contained a lot of information about biochemistry in which we have little or no background, so we're not reading the rest in context. That leaves the stories, which are more emotional than scientific.

But again, those are all things we should all be doing anyway.
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Old 12-02-2015, 02:59 PM   #19
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No worries GG. I understand completely what you're saying. Hope is a blessing, and I pray these reports will lead to productive conclusions for treatment of this hideous disease.
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Old 12-02-2015, 03:33 PM   #20
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This theory has actually been around for a while now - since at least 2005, unless I'm mistaken.

A few years ago, Mayo Clinic published similar findings:

Eating Lots of Carbs, Sugar May Raise Risk of Cognitive Impa [...] | Mayo Clinic News Network

Is it definitive? Of course not. You have to take these things with a healthy dose of skepticism. But, based on my own experience, I do believe there could very well be something to it.

For many, many years I ate lots of so called "complex carbohydrates." I rarely touched soda or fruit juices, and limited myself to brown rice, beans, homemade whole wheat bread, etc. I avoided fat, exercised regularly, and tried to do all the things that the medical community tells you is part of a healthy lifestyle. Yet, despite trying to do everything right, I gained an incredible amount of weight. At one point I was 120 pounds heavier than what I weighed after high school.

Ten years ago I became prediabetic. Last year, it had developed into full blown diabetes. Coincidentally, around this same time my wife told me she was becoming concerned because I was starting to develop cognitive problems. I would start to talk and in mid-sentence couldn't remember what I was talking about, or couldn't find words. Now many will say this is simply a part of growing older. But my problem came on so suddenly that it really scared me a little.

When I changed my diet to throttle back carb intake and increase fat, it was life changing. Even though I was consuming more calories than ever before (I currently eat around 2500 calories a day), 90 pounds of weight melted off. Like magic. My energy came back, my brain fog lifted, GERD went away, cholesterol normalized, and the diabetes has completely regressed. Two months ago, I had my annual physical and the doctor told me that he very rarely ever sees these types of health problems simply disappear.

Are carbs detrimental to everyone's health? Obviously, there are many people who seem to thrive on them. At the same time I also think we're not a one-diet-fits-all group of mammals. We've evolved to thrive on a varied diet, and there are also far too many variables involved for physicians to make generalized statements or prescribe the same diet for every single person. Some of us don't react well to carbohydrates - simple, complex, or otherwise. I happen to fit into that category.
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